Gluing cedar for outdoor furniture

I thought I would use your basic Titebond for this project, maybe coat the joints (mostly mortise and tenons) with acetone. But I read where other glues are preferable. What's the verdict?
Thanks,
Mike
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On 6/5/2018 10:57 AM, Michael wrote:

Titebond comes in many varieties. Some are called water proof, some weather resistant, and indoor use. Gorilla glue also makes a variety of wood glues not just polyurethane.
Keep in mind that if you are using wet cedar a polyurethane adhesive may be the better choice.
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On Tuesday, June 5, 2018 at 10:57:07 AM UTC-5, Michael wrote:

e joints (mostly mortise and tenons) with acetone. But I read where other g lues are preferable. What's the verdict?

Eastern Red Cedar? I've made benches, similar to the (link) pictured ones , that has been outside for years, with no problems. Titebond II was used . https://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/8011600218/in/dateposted-public/
One outside bench was looking so weathered I didn't want to refinish it, to o much work. I gave it to a friend to refinish. Still solidly glued toge ther.
I made Mom some cedar plant "stands" (stools?) - a slab with limbs glued on to the bottom. They held up for about 3 years, before needing repair/regl uing. Though this pictured plant stand is indoors, this is the basic construction of the outdoor stands. https://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/5323317669/in/dateposted-public/
On all these above projects, the holes drilled for the limb legs were fairl y large, at least 1" diameter and fairly deep, as well. Hence, the beefy c onstruction, along with gluing, made for their long term stability. *on so me, the limb legs rotted before the joints fail, as the plants are watered and/or rained on.
Sonny
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On 6/5/2018 11:25 AM, Sonny wrote:

Believe it or not one of the magazines tested several years ago, 10 or so years back. TBII proved to me more water resistant than TBIII.

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On 6/6/2018 9:36 AM, Leon wrote: ...

...
Well, you have to understand what the ANSI tests are; ANSI Type I (TB3) and ANSI Type II (TB2) are vastly different and neither is really all that representative of normal weathering use. All one can really say about the two products is that they pass the ANSI tests and so are compliant to the Standard.
To qualify a glue to the ANSI Standard the procedure is to make some birch plywood with three plies using the test adhesive for gluing the veneers together.
For Type 1 test the 1" x 3" sample is 1) boiled in water for four hours 2) dried at 145F for 20 hours 3) boiled for four more hours 4) cooled immediately and tested wet for bond strength.
The strength test is a shear test trying to slide the veneers past each other. The shear strength required and the amount of wood failure versus glue failure is specified in the standard.
For the ANSI Type 2 test the 2" x 5" sample is 1) soaked in water (not boiled) for four hours 2) dried at 120 F for 19 hours 3) 1) & 2) repeated two more times, for a total of three cycles
To pass the test, the sample must not have delaminated; there is no stress test, only that the joints are still intact.
One would have to know the specifics of the magazine's testing to be able to judge and unless they followed a similar protocol to the ANSI tests there's no real reason to expect much correlation.
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On 6/6/2018 10:40 AM, dpb wrote:

Preaching to the choir. LOL. When that article came out I contacted a TB rep and it was explained that the glues passed those particular tests. No where in the description of the test standards are the words "Water Proof" except in the title.

The magazine had a pretty detailed test and explanation. While I understand the standards ratings the average buyer is going to look at "Water Proof" on the label. The test standard that it passed would not describe "Water Proof" in a way that a user would relate to.
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On Tue, 5 Jun 2018 08:57:04 snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

that hf glue is great and it is not runny like titebond which might be good for this application
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On Tue, 5 Jun 2018 08:57:04 snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

another option is to not use glue
get some nice hex head stainless bolts with nice washers and nuts
can even get some of those round head nuts
gives it a modern look but make sure to buy quality stainless
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