Electrical Connection Technique (A Woodworking Tool Is Involved)

Keeping this relevant to the wRec, the following video shows us how to replace the power cord on a circular saw.
If you start at 4:30, you will see a technique for creating a "ring connector" from the bare power cord wires. What do think of this technique?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?vae5xG4kqXE

I have some issues with some of the other things he says and does in the video, but this question is mainly about the connection method he uses.
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On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote

The proper method is to crimp a ring crimp terminal onto the wires, if there is space -- which looks questionable in this case.
In the old days, manufacturers crimped a hollow brass eyelet around the stranded wire, creating a solid metal ring, but I have not seen that in ages, and it wasn´t something that one could afford to do at home anyway.
Failing that, I twist the copper strands into a solid bundle and tin the bundle with liquid rosin flux and radio solder, making a solid wire. This is bent around the terminal screw in the direction of tightening, and the screw is tightened. The wrap direction is critical to ensure that the wire does not squeeze out from under the terminal screw.
One could also form an eyelet as shown in the video, and then tinned the copper wire to solidify the ring.
The key is to ensure that thge terminal screw cannot cut the wire while being tightened.
. I would not have drilled the plastic to get to the torx screws in the plastic handle. One can get torx screwdriver inserts with 6" shafts.
I could not see how the cable was clamped on entry to the saw handle, but this area is critical.
Joe Gwinn
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On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:52:22 AM UTC-5, Joseph Gwinn wrote:

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That was one of my issues also. In fact, on that model saw, the Torx screws are also slotted. A narrow flat blade screw driver works just fine in the deep handle hole.

The handle itself clamps the cord in 2 places. 1 - The hole formed by the 2 piece handle for the stress relief sleeve is smaller than the sleeve itself.
2 - Interior from that, the handle pieces form another "hole" that has a straight plastic bar across it. As long as you leave the outer insulation on the cord, you basically need a clamp to close the handle before screwing it back together. You could use the screws to pull it together but I don't like putting that much stress on screws going into plastic.
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On Friday, December 21, 2018 at 11:52:22 AM UTC-5, Joseph Gwinn wrote:

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BTW...I also don't like the fact that he used a 3 prong plug and cut the ground wire off on the inside, saying that using the 3 prong plug "doesn't hurt".
I don't like doing that more on principle than on any actual "danger". I do n't like giving the user the impression that a device is wired in a certain man ner (e.g. equipment ground is present) when in reality it is wired differently.
I don't think that that tool would be approved by OSHA for use on a job sit e if they knew that the ground wire was not being used.
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On Dec 21, 2018, DerbyDad03 wrote

I agree. I would have connected the green to the motor frame somehow. But double-insulated does work anyway, so the safety is not reduced.
My lathe cane with floating green, and that lathe would give a tickle due to leakage from motor windings to motor frame, and thus to lathe cabinet. The short-tern fix was a green ground wite (with ring terminals at both ends) from cabinet to electrical safety ground. Wen I rewired the lathe, I discovered the floating green, and fixed the problem.
But I will say that the guy in the video probably is not an electrical guy, and so would not know what to do with that wire if he could not find a green terminal for it.

Well, actually it would have been approved when it came out, and also today. Double-insulated is still OK by UL.
Joe Gwinn
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On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 13:24:03 -0500, Joseph Gwinn

The thing I wonder about is how it got the three-wire cord to begin with. I suspect that the cord that was on it was not the original.
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On Fri, 21 Dec 2018 13:31:34 -0500, J. Clarke

The "eylet" procedure he uses is not uncommon - but to do it ptoperly he should solder the loop

The full wire bent around the contact screw can often be too much - a crimprd ting is best, the "split eye" soldered is next best.

WHich is what "I" prefer

Correct - a bit of a "bodge"

Correct. The original likely had an insulated netalclamp around the cord. Or it was "bonded" into the strain releif (I've done it with silicone sealer)

The green wire isn't an OSHA issue, per se, but that cap plug would not pass. The saw came with a molded plug and most OSHA inspectors won't pass a "repaired" cord of any type.
I know they don't like manually installed ends - male or female - on extention cords. Used to repair damaged cords by making one cord into 2. Now I get those cords for home use because they are not allowed on a job site. Lots of "good" cords are scrapped every year because they cannot be "repaired"
Some inspectors may not be as "anal" as the ones around here -- -

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wrote:

Reading my reply I guess I should proofread my replies -fat finger syndrome hit again
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wrote:

*NOT* a good idea. Soldering the loop will put all the bending and vibration stress at the point where the solder ends. The wire will work-harden at that point.
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On Dec 22, 2018, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote

Only if one has not secured the cable at the entry point, as discussed upthread.
I have been doing this for decades, and have never had this problem.
If the assembly was going to undergo military-level vibration testing, then no soldering - must be crimped.
Joe Gwinn
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On Sat, 22 Dec 2018 11:48:54 -0500, Joseph Gwinn

As in aviation repairs - where "soldered connections MUST be supported" - which is generally interpreted as "crimp only"
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wrote:

There's another issue with solder on connections that carry significant power--heat it up and solder melts. I ran into this with the ground cable on a Volvo once. Took me the longest time to figure it out--when the weather was warm the car would start fine, when it was cold it wouldn't, but when I checked things the battery and cables were fine. Wasn't until I noticed something smoking one day that I figured out that it was the soldered-on ground clamp that most of the solder had run out of so there wasn't much contact but enough that a meter showed low resistance. Had a connector one crimped on and the problem went away.
Admittedly this is less likely to be an issue with a saw but it's still worth bearing in mind. There's a reason NEC requires pressure connectors and not solder.
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On 12/22/18 12:38 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

What the heck kind of solder did you use? Isn't the melting point of common solder up near 350 degrees?
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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wrote:

Most wire solder for electronics around 700 F iron is used, solder paste 185 C and 170 C ( for two sided boards that are soldered ). Plumbing solder not sure.
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wrote:

Except in the case of surface mount components solder should NEVER be the primary connection. All soldered joints should be "mechanically secure" before soldering. In other words, crimp AND solder, or twist AND solder. On battery cables you crimp to make the electrical and mechanical connection, then you solder to seal and protect the joint. (gas tight joint - which is also the aim of a properly crimped (or "crimp-welded" electrical connector. Even then, if the soldered cable end came loose, you had other problems - like a loose or corroded bolt-on connection that caused the connection to heat up. A properly connected and soldered cable end does NOT heat up enouigh to melt the solder.
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On 12/22/18 1:34 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:

The only thing I was thinking was a loose connection that would cause arcing. That could certainly melt... and weld. :-)
--

-MIKE-

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On 12/22/18 2:55 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

https://photos.app.goo.gl/HRzJKWSEHHmgKE3X7
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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wrote:

And it could destroy a crimped connection too. My bet is a loose connection overheated the crimped connectionand it let go - with no solder involved.
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wrote:

Nope. There was no sign of a crimp. There was a fitting that appeared to be die-cast--trying to crimp it would likely have busted it. It had a hole in it. There was a cable that was by that time a loose sliding fit in the hole. The cable would slide in and out, there was nothing holding it except solder and the solder was mostly gone.
As for being loose, I had to use a breaker bar to get the damned thing off.
Sorry, but your apologetics for soldered joints are falling on deaf ears here.
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wrote:

The problem with that statement is "properly connected and soldered". If it's "properly connected" it doesn't need solder and if it's soldered you can't tell if it's being held together by the "proper connection" or by the solder. In any case, it was a Volvo cable that came on the car, the car was bought new, so if you have a problem with its manufacture don't point fingers at _me_, point them at Volvo.
Note, Swedes must have mad driving skills--I've had two Volvos and they were both horrible winter cars. Got stuck at the drop of a hat, didn't like to start, the heater froze on one (not the coolant in the heater core, the _fan_ managed to get full of ice, freeze, and burn out the motor).
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