Timber framed 1980s houses: resale prospects

Back in the 1980s World in Action ran a scare story about timber framed homes (specifically Barratt homes if I remember correctly) which caused resale values of these types of houses to plummet.
Is this still the case? Are buyers and mortgage lenders wary of such houses?
If I buy a 1980s Barratt timber framed home will I find it difficult to sell in the future? I am located in Yorks. Housing market is buoyant but I have a seen a detached house for sale which is slightly cheaper than market value... I know that these houses were timber framed ones built in the 1980s.
bruce
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bruce phipps wrote:

I think that most houses in Scandinavia are timber framed. My first house was a Yuill timber frame semi and I found it excellent for heat insulation and soundproofing. I bought it for 3375 in 1969 and sold for 7400 after seven years. When I moved into a conventional (brick/concrete block construction), I was very disappointed with the levels of insulation (sound & heat) and even experienced damp patches on walls due to bridged ties in the walls. I then had to pay for cavity wall insualtion, which wasn't necessary in my previous timber frame. If I ever planned to build my own house, I would definitely go for a timber frame.
Terry D.
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There's nothing wrong with timber frame - some advantages and some disadvantages over masonry construction. The crucial thing though IMO is that timber frame construction does require a higher standard of workmanship (particularly wrt clear cavities, vapour barriers and fire stopping) which was sadly lacking in those Barratt homes mentioned by the OP. Everything depends on the site agent appreciating what is required and enforcing it.
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Terry D wrote:

Good timber frame is very good. I just built a massive one. Crap timber frame may be less so.
Barrat houses suffered from poor sound insulation and 'cardboard' internal walls. Its not too hard to improve that, but you can't eliminate it entirely.
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On Thu, 09 Sep 2004 11:19:03 GMT, "Terry D"
I believe there is a tremendous difference bwteen Scandinavian timber-framed houses and Barratt/Wimpy offerings. Personally, I would not touch one of the latter with the proverbial bargepole.
MM
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A daughter did her thesis on timber framed houses at this time and spent a lot of time researching the 'problem' houses featured in the story. It was, as these things always are, blown out of proportion by journalists and in any case the problems were isolated cases.
Timber framed houses have every possible advantage as far as I'm concerned, I'd love to live in one, better still to build one.

I don't know about that. Why not ask them?

I doubt it, memories won't go back as far as that and individual surveys would, I'd have thought, have more weight than reputation.

This is a diy group, if you have problems can't you see to them yourself? Timber framed houses per se aren't a problem. Think of those C14th ones which are still going strong ...
Mary

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wrote:

Think of all the C14th ones that fell down or rotted away long long ago...
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Not within the span of modern houses.
And most didn't rot or fall down, they were demolished to make way for something more modern.
Mary
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wrote:

I'll be impressed with how you know this.
As you pointed out, the fittest survive. It does not automatically follow that they are representative of their generation. Just like old people.
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ones
ago...
I doubt that I could impress you. But I am an historian and have made a study of timber framed buildings.

I don't understand your point there!
Mary

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wrote:

Fairy nuff.

Merely that the assertion that "X is still around, therefore X is a sound design" is not exactly well-founded. I play golf regularly with a bunch of healthy active pensioners, but it would be wrong to deduce from that that either golf keeps you healthy or that there are lots of pensioners about. For all I know, they're the only ones left, and playing golf brought about the early demise of the rest :-)
[These are truly random sigs below, btw...]
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follow
people.
I don't think I said that - but I'm not prepared to go back and look or to argue if you do.
But I doubt that regular houses won't be around in 600 years.

The key phrase there is: "For all I know". Proper, peer reviewed research might show the opposite :-)

I'd gathered that.
Mary
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On Thu, 9 Sep 2004 15:32:44 +0100, "Mary Fisher"

Ah, I sense collaboration on the horizon! Because while I have little interest in timber-framed buildings, I would like to write a book on day about British council housing construction since WWII. You may very well be the person who can help me get started.
MM
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wrote:

Why do you want to write such a book?
Mary

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On Sat, 11 Sep 2004 11:36:57 +0100, "Mary Fisher"

Because I believe that council houses represent a very valuable part of Britain's heritage, since many designs have proved their worth over more than fifty years. These houses, whilst aesthetically not looking all that fantastic from the outside, fulfilled a purpose and were far better than the "emergency" prefabs.
Obviously, there are bad council houses to offset the good ones. But most council houses are value for money, given that the available living space is often much larger than equivalent non-council properties in the same bracket, the properties tend to attract lower prices, and are therefore very suitable for first-time buyers.
I know such a book would be hitting a niche market, but it is a book that needs to be written while there are still council houses left and people in planning departments who remember that era are still alive. Trouble is, it is such a daunting task, as there is so very little information already available on which to base a new book. My book would have the design plans of, say, half-a-dozen representative properties from around the country, detailed enough so that a complete fanatic could even build one from scratch, if so desired. The book would contain many photos and computer simulations, details of finishes used, details of floor coverings, garden sizes, roof structure, insulation (!), heating, foundations, and a lot more besides. Even in Foyles, Charing Cross Road, I found nothing remotely like this. Mostly I could only find brief paragraphs that mentioned council house building, but really only from a political/social viewpoint, not from the construction angle.
Anyway, I could go on. But this will hopefully serve to whet some readers' appetites for such a book!
MM
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"Mike Mitchell" wrote | Because I believe that council houses represent a very valuable | part of Britain's heritage, since many designs have proved their | worth over more than fifty years. These houses, whilst aesthetically | not looking all that fantastic from the outside, fulfilled a purpose | and were far better than the "emergency" prefabs. ... | The book would contain many photos and computer simulations, | details of finishes used, details of floor coverings, garden | sizes, roof structure, insulation (!), heating, foundations, and a | lot more besides. Even in Foyles, Charing Cross Road, I found | nothing remotely like this. Mostly I could only find brief | paragraphs that mentioned council house building, but really | only from a political/social viewpoint, not from the construction | angle.
I have a copy of "Specification - the standard reference book for architects, surveyors and municipal engineers" 1947 (The Architectural Press) which covers a lot of what you are interested in, although from the perspective of new post-war building generally.
Incidentally, it has a whole chapter on "Insulated construction" including refrigeration ("when designing a large block of flats, consideration shoudl be given to a central refrigeration system, in which individual small cold stores in each flat are supplied by pipes from a large plant housed in the basement"), sound and vibration insulation.
Some of the adverts are interesting - Kent & Sussex Contractors Ltd were proud of building the first Dartford Corporation houses.
Probably the RIBA library archives would be the place to start looking.
Owain
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wrote:

a
Not much better. They were far too small for the families who occupied them. The only decent council houses were the immediate post war houses built according to Bevan. He wanted quality in design and construction, but this was time consuming. The Tory McMillan reversed all this to get the numbers up, with dire consequences in many instances. In Hemel Hempstead they refer to older council house as Beven houses, which go for good prices, and McMillan houses, which do not.
Many of the cheap and nasty council homes of the Tory administrations ended up horrendously expensive as they created appalling social conditions. In hindsight they would have been better off continuing what Bevan was doing. High quality. Faster and cheaper techniques could have been used as long as the design in homes and suburbs was kept up. This they never did, as all aspects were done on the cheap. The homes were cheap and nasty and the urban planning equally appalling. We are still paying the price for this contempt of the working classes. The jealous middle classes in their small box semi's would cry "they have bathrooms, what more do they want?" Or derogatory comments as "they will put coal in the bath". What curtailed good council house and suburb design and building, was good old British petty snobbery.
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I lived in a council house and never came across these attitudes.
I should think that nowadays most people would want more than bathrooms - central heating, for instance.
We had a coal house to put the coal in, but did know what a bth was for. It saved us going to the public baths as we had done for all my life before then. And loved it - those enormous ceramic bths were pure luxury.
My friends were pretty wealthy, from professional families (my dad was a labourer) and lived in large houses, not box semis. They never made any derogatory comments about where I lived.
Perhaps you felt the way you describe ...
Mary

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Mary Fisher wrote:

IMM gets his clarss conshesnuss out of the bumper book of inverted snobbery Mary. None of it is real.

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council
snobbery.
bathrooms -

It
Spoken like a true snot.
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