Suggestions for standard drill - keyed / keyless

My old Back and Decker hammer drill died on Sunday. It was 20 years old, and it's had some serious use over the last 6 months (and occasional use before that), but I think it finally choked on masonry dust and overheated when run almost continuously for a couple of hours. I'll know better next time! ;-)
I've borrowed (and intend to buy) a cordless drill, mostly for screw driving. I also have a cheap SDS which I use mostly for chiselling.
I _think_ I also want a standard mains drill. Certainly there are plenty of jobs where the cord is no problem, and having full power for hours without changing the batteries is a huge benefit. Also having two drills is very helpful sometimes.
Reversible, varispeed by selector and also by trigger pull (i.e. selector selects max allowed speed, trigger lets you vary from nothing up to this speed), variable clutch, switchable hammer action - all the standard stuff.
Question is, should I go keyed or keyless?
I've read the FAQ, but it doesn't answer stupid questions like: can you put normal wood drill bits into a keyless chuck?
It also raises stupid questions like: if keyless chucks are supposed to be less reliable in reverse, how come they work fine on screwdriving tasks?
It seems there are at least a couple of types of keyless chucks, and obviously different qualities. My old drill was a standard keyed chuck, which I was quite happy with - but if keyed chucks are easier and now just as good, I'll look at them - there seems to be more of those around now.
I'll probably go for a mid-range tool since the last mig-range tool lasted 20 years... http://www.diyfaq.org.uk/powertools/category.htm ...and they don't scream "steal me" - though the Makita right-angled drill I bought seems in a different league in terms of quality and robustness - time will tell.
Any suggestions / experience / advice welcome.
Cheers, David.
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David Robinson wrote:

Whilst keyless chucks are convenient, the ones I have require a button to be depressed, preventing shaft rotation, whilst the chuck is tightened. At the moment I can do this OK, but I have a slight worry that if my thumb grip ever weakens, I'll have trouble getting it fully tight.
Chris
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Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
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We discussed this topic not long ago, and this is the first I have heard of a keyless chuck with a button on it?
Summing up what was said last time, there are several different types of keyless chuck. Some seem to just rely on brute force to tighten them, whilst others have a better ratcheting action that clicks as you tighten them These hold better than the basic ones and are more expensive, but unless you are using hammer a lot, even the cheap type is up to the job of most drilling and screwing tasks.
The OP should keep the chucks from his old drills as spares: then he will have the best of both worlds.
S
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Spamlet wrote:

Sorry, my wording was sloppy. I have a couple of drills, both of which have a button on the drill body to stop the shaft rotating whilst the chuck is tightened.
Chris
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wrote:

You sure its a drill and not a router? :)
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The Other Mike wrote:

PSB 700 RES
Chris
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wrote:

Have a look at the Bosch GBH2-26DFR
http://www.angliatoolcentre.co.uk/bosch-gbh2-26dfr-2kg-sds+-hammer-drill-110v-pid8573.html
It's a mains sds drill with an interchangeable keyless chuck. Lift a collar to pop off either the sds or keyless chuck, push on the other chuck. No need to even remove the bit currently in the chuck. The keyless chuck is the best I've seen anywhere on a handheld drill (only industrial pedestal drills have better IME).
Note that you want the DFR model, not the DRE - which comes without the keyless chuck.
(My experience is with the older GBH2-24 model, which I've owned for 10 years - but I beleive the newer model is just restyling and a better mains lead).
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Nice video of the chuck change here:
http://www.toolstop.co.uk/bosch-gbh2-26-dfr-2-kilo-rotary-hammer-with-sds-plus-shank-240v-p2969
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snipped-for-privacy@gglz.com wrote:

http://www.angliatoolcentre.co.uk/bosch-gbh2-26dfr-2kg-sds+-hammer-drill-110v-pid8573.html
Looks lurvely.. but not 'mid range' pricewise & a bit on the 'long' side..
I've got a Hitachi Fdv16vb2 Hammer Drill 550w which is superb. Compact, light, bloody powerful, excellent keyless chuck, useful case.
Picked it up in B&Q for about 55, not sure if they still do them.
http://www.powertools2u.co.uk/Percussion-Drills/Hitachi-FDV16VB2-Impact-Drill.htm?gclid=CJCznZrJgKUCFaP92AodZVC2hg
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On Mon, 01 Nov 2010 09:42:29 -0700, David Robinson wrote:

I've got a DeWalt mains (well, 120VAC here in the US ;) drill which has a keyless chuck, and I must say that I've been impressed with it so far.
I've had it for around 4 years now and it sees almost daily use, with a variety of materials and drill bits, and I think in that time I've only had it lose grip on me a couple of times (and then just because I was being lazy about tightening it, rather than it being a wear or design issue)
Yes, it'll take normal wood bits happily - anything up to around 1/2" in diameter.

In principle, I like the idea of a keyed chuck better, but on a hand drill I'd like a way of stowing the key with the drill, rather than having to keep it separately in a pocket, toolbox etc. - maybe they all do that now though (my last mains drill with a chuck key was some ancient B&D thing from nineteen-seventy-mumble)
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wrote:

I was in the same situation several months ago, and reached quickly for the online catalogues. But was advised that since I had an SDS and a cordless, I probably wouldnt need a vanilla mains drill. Well, I do, but my ancient standby drill seems to have filled the need fine - its a more limited need due to the other 2 tools, so I must be one of very few people on here that's gone back to using a 1960s mains drill. Between the 3 tools it seems I can do it all.
NT
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The only "fill-in" I found I needed between various cordless drills/ drivers and my sds-with-interchangeable-chuck, was something with really high torque to driver large auger bits into wood.
I ended up with a keyed-chuck dewalt mixer-drill. Superb device, but quite a price for a niche-use.
I wished I had been able to buy the Wickes high torque drill (actually a rebadged Kress), but that reputed-gem had been discontinued.
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Maybe I've been lucky but I've not experienced the problems that reputedly bedevil keyless chucks - even on cheap drills.
If you're not in a hurry, I'd look for an offer on a rebadged Kress at Wickes. The one-handed keyless chuck on that is excellent.
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Thats exactly what my oldie has spent most of its time doing. Despite being 2 hundred and something watts, it drives a 1" auger into tough wood without any hesitation. So far I've even managed without the reverse function, as I've mostly been drilling until the hole goes through. For the occasional blind hole, manual rotation of the bit half to 1 turn has been enough to unstick it. I was surprised it does an inch auger, but it does it easily.
NT
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I guess making a gearbox to gear down a motor to really low-revs/high- torque is expensive - particularly if it's built to last.
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wrote:

Was that the corded or cordless one? I think that they did a cordless one that also had a 90 degree adaptor but also a mains one that had gears and could be used for mixing. The Medway Handyman posted here about the corded one I remember. By the time I learnt about them they had been reduced to clear and no-one had any left. Does anyone else sell Kress drills? Surely Wickes wasn't/isn't the only people to sell Kress drills? Do Kress still make Wickes' drills? I thought the new range was made by someone else but I don't know why I think that.
Thanks, Stephen.
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On 21/11/2010 14:40, Stephen wrote:

The Wickes light grey bodied "pro" stuff is usually made by reasonably decent OEMs, although not always the same one. So they have done drills by Kress, and routers by Freud etc, but that does not mean that they deal exclusively with those OEMs.
(One of the problems with much of the Wickes pro stuff was they often charge more for it that the actual own label OEMs charge! The Kress drills used to be quite attractive at the price - but these days Makita etc have come down to the same price point which makes them less interesting).
Back in 2004 I emailed Kress regarding sales and support etc. They said they did not have any dealers in the UK but did sell direct from Germany. They also had a couple of service agents here. (I posted the reply here at the time)
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Cheers,

John.

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On Sun, 21 Nov 2010 19:54:09 +0000, John Rumm

I could try that as there isn't import duty on purchases within the EU is there? The last time I looked though, the Kress drills were brightly coloured; the Wickes grey was kinder on the eye!
Thanks, Stephen.
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On 22/11/2010 17:25, Stephen wrote:

There was a time the Wickes one was quite a bit cheaper than the other 2kg SDS machines, but not you can have a blue bosch, Makita, Hitachi etc for much the same money the attraction seems far less - especially as the others have extensive dealer and after sales support in the uk.
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Cheers,

John.

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snipped-for-privacy@gglz.com wrote:

I've got one I hardly ever use if you need one.
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