Seems James Dyson was right after all.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-39882674
Strange how Bosch and Siemens only wanted laboratory test conditions used I wonder why.
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On 11/05/2017 16:53, whisky-dave wrote:

Dyson was talking rubbish. His vacs have filters and they clog up. The cyclones clog with far less fluff and dirt than a bag does. They did introduce a cap on motor wattage. They also set an minimum efficiency. So what exactly is he moaning about?
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On 11/05/2017 17:17, dennis@home wrote:

We've had a Dyson for 13 years and the filter has only needed to be cleaned about a half dozen times in that period. You're the one talking rubbish.
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You have a magical Dyson not like any other. I know FIVE people locally with Dysons. Every one of them has to repair something on it about once a year. Either the clutch jams, the motor fails, the handle falls off, etc. They're made cheaply, yet they charge a fortune for them. Rover quality, Mercedes price.
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James Wilkinson Sword wrote:

Hey! I use a Mercedes to clean my carpets! Very good build quality and price, about 120quid new and it's still working after 25 years. The only part I've had to replace was the mounting that holds the filter in place.
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I never said there was anything wrong with Mercedes.
Rover: shit quality, cheap Mercedes: good quality, expensive BMW: shit quality, expensive
Only the first two make sense.
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On 11/05/2017 17:37, Bod wrote:

That actually proves my point! Unless you cleaned them for fun.
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James Wilkinson Sword wrote:

Every two years ........
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On 11/05/2017 18:23, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:

I use disposable hepa-flo filter bags in my Henry and in a decade the motor filter is still in near pristine condition.
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On 11/05/2017 17:37, Bod wrote:

When I've used a Dyson to vac up ash or fine plaster dust, the filters have clogged within minutes. Using a Henry gives no such problems.
After a party, the Dyson rapidly clogs the cyclones with streamers from party-poppers and the carboard disks block the inlet to the cyclone if they happen to arrive at the wrong angle. The Henry sucks not only that up, but the complete party-popper plastic casing with no problem!
SteveW
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On Thursday, 11 May 2017 23:27:44 UTC+1, Steve Walker wrote:

I've found that sucking up plaster glogs the dyson, and sucking up screws nailas and other crap cause the hose to get a split in it. We have a henrey and dyson at work, we use the henry for the heavy duty stuff and the dyson for lighter work the sort of uses it would get in a home.

Those are the sort of things I've always with a dustpan and brush. I've never seen anyong on our building sites clearing up rubbble and hardcore with a dyson or a henry use the tools for what they were designed for. For use here we chose a tool that fits the job. Are you the sort of person that uses a hammer and a jewelers screwdriver to knock out bricks ?

But does your Henry suck up household dust as well as any other cleaner ? You've tested bith with party poppers why not try actual dust, which is what vacuum cleaners were really designed for.
I wonder why people don;t want to see things tested in the real world but prefer simulations.
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On 12/05/2017 12:35, whisky-dave wrote:

The henry is sold as a household vacuum cleaner and it does a good job. There is nothing sophisticated about a Henry. It is a plastic tub in which a disposable bag can be fitted with a motor on top, separated by removable filter.

In the real world people don't vacuum their house for 20 minutes each day, 365 days a year.
Dust from a DIY job is a real world application. In this case it is not being suggested that the vacuum clearer is being used to suck up hardcore but the fine dust left after a brush and pan has first been used to remove the heavy solid bits.
James Dyson is complaining about the testing methods related to obtaining an EU energy rating, and not necessarily about the energy rating if his own machines. The testing is unlikely to be real world situations. Do we only have graded dust in our homes?
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On Saturday, 13 May 2017 07:28:27 UTC+1, alan_m wrote:

Yes I know we have one at work.

Yes I know.

What of it.

No they don't they rarely if ever vacuum with a device that doesnl;t fill up with dust, most people don't vacuum with a brand new cleaner everyday either. Most clean with a cleamer that already has dirt in it.

Depending on the DIY.

Yes which is how most would use them, and how the henrey was used in the workshop. It was brought to suck up workshop related stuff as it was seen as a heavy duty cleaner not for rumble but for wood and metal working cleaning.

Why test a vacuum cleaner without any bag or dust in it. Like the fake test they do with cars they measure the MPG 0-60 and all sorts but with NO driver or passenger and sometimes only one seat present in a 4 seater car that might make sense to you but not me or most sensible people.
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On 15/05/2017 12:14, whisky-dave wrote:

The test doesn't have a clean vac for most of the test. It gets dirty as soon as it starts to pickup dust. Maybe they should vac up 1kg of dirt and fluff. Dyson would love that as they would have to empty the damn thing several times with that much fluff. My vac wouldn't even fill 25% of the bag with 1kg of fluff.
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On Monday, 15 May 2017 13:58:31 UTC+1, dennis@home wrote:

Then why didn't they agree to those tests. If I manufactured a cleane rthat was bettere than say dyson I;d want them to be tested until full of dust, how much dust and how they perfom as a graph building up to full, there mus t have been some reason. I wonder if its the same reason they wouldn't test cars with people in them or with seats or on roads.
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My Vax sucks up rubble, wet parrot shit, fine dust, fibreglass, anything. No problem. Most stays in the reusable cloth bag. The small amount that gets through goes into the big cloth filter or the little sponge one. It's now 25 years old and the most that's gone wrong with it is a busted cable when I yanked it.
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On Saturday, 13 May 2017 17:07:40 UTC+1, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
rote:

ns

ing

ws nailas and other crap cause the hose to get a split in it.

stuff and the dyson for lighter work the sort of uses it would get in a ho me.

m
rdcore with a dyson or a henry use the tools for what they were designed fo r.

r to knock out bricks ?

No problem. Most stays in the reusable cloth bag. The small amount that gets through goes into the big cloth filter or the little sponge one. It' s now 25 years old and the most that's gone wrong with it is a busted cable when I yanked it.
Some people have both and use the best tool for the job. My first cordless cleaner ran from 2 AA batteries I didn't expect it to suc k up rubble.
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I expect a household cleaner to clean anything, not one specific thing.
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On Monday, 15 May 2017 21:40:54 UTC+1, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
rote:

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be

alking

ers

crews nailas and other crap cause the hose to get a split in it.

uty stuff and the dyson for lighter work the sort of uses it would get in a home.

from

if

hardcore with a dyson or a henry use the tools for what they were designed for.

iver to knock out bricks ?

ng. No problem. Most stays in the reusable cloth bag. The small amount t hat gets through goes into the big cloth filter or the little sponge one. It's now 25 years old and the most that's gone wrong with it is a busted ca ble when I yanked it.

suck up rubble.

Then that would be yuor problem seems starange so many differnt cleaners ar e avaible them doen't it.
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One born every minute, as I said my 25 year old Vax hoovers up anything. I've used it for very dusty things, wet things, heavy things, anything you like, no problem at all. It has a proper cloth bag which traps everything but the finest dust, and that gets trapped in a cloth filter, then a little foam filter. Never had to replace any of them, just empty the bag and bang the filter outside to remove the dust.
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