[OT] Switching mains using Chromecast?

Are there any gizmos which can be attached to the Chromecast-Audio device to switch the mains on and off?
It would be nice if I could switch on the mains power to my stereo player by using my tablet to send a request to the Chromecast-Audio device and then for the device to switch the mains power.
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On 19/05/16 13:31, pamela wrote:

The answer is almost certainly yes, but specifying what they should be is another matter.

Probably your best solution is to either have something else on teh network that responds to a remote command - like a Raspberry Pi or similar driving a mains relay, or to build as bit of custom hardware that detects an audio signal off the Chromecast and use that to hold a relay closed until the music shuts off for a few minutes.
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My sub woofer has an audio present detection system, however it seems to not work very well as when the stereo is on at background listeing levels you can quite clearly hear it cut in and out seemingly randomly so I don't think this is very good.
I'm very supprised by now there is not a set of switched outlets that does this via wifi. Back in the day a scheme called red boxes did something similar on a remote control. Brian
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Sorry, I don't have an answer to your question but I would like to ask one myself.
In recent weeks there has been a number of positive comments about the CCA not least the very competitive price. However, a little research revealed that the device does not support gapless playback. Now for me this is intolerable but do you CCA fans just live with this or isn't it an issue for some reason?
I have read that some items including one online music subscription service can send the CCA a continuous stream of audio and by so doing mimic gapless, is this what you're all doing?
Bob.
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Bob Latham wrote:

Google Play Music is *supposed* to support gapless playback, though I find it doesn't always get it right, a bit of googling says it depends on the album being digitised right by the source, just tried it on a Roger Waters album sent to the chromecast and there were no hiccups across tracks where there is dialogue and background sounds continuing between them.
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That's interesting. I was thinking of getting one of these devices but was put off by the lack of gapless. A friend of mine has bought one and he's done a fair bit testing himself and come to the conclusion that the device can't do gapless itself at all. It mimics gapless when the source sends a constant stream to it and treats it like a wi-fi dac where it doesn't know where one track starts and another ends.
I'll be honest, it is a bit poor not to support gapless properly now, the majority of kit managed gapless from about 3 years ago.
Bob.
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Bob Latham wrote:

What would be the difference between "gapless" and a "constant stream"?
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Fair question.
I will try to answer it but I don't claim to be an expert.
The situation AIUI where the CCA fails to do gapless is where it has been told to play a number of tracks from a music source. The source being a computer or NAS containing (for arguments sake) flac files. The CCA doesn't ready the next track ie. open it, until the previous track has finished. Only one file open at a time, which means there will be an unintended silence between tracks.
I cannot remember at the moment the name of the call but there is a software function that BubbleUPnP server uses to find out if the player can do gapless playback. This fails with CCA.
In the constant stream model, the CCA isn't fetching music from the server, the server is pushing a stream of data to the CCA as though it were a USB dac.
I'm not an expert and I'm fully aware there is more to it than I have written.
Cheers,
Bob.
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Bob Latham wrote:

OK, I'm not using it with e.g. a local DLNA server but with Google Play Music on a tablet, streaming from the internet.
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If that suites you then it's fine.
Bob.
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On 23/05/16 13:33, Bob Latham wrote:

Of at least a millisecond..?

There must be. It doesn't make sense to me as written, and I am a software audio and networking engineer.
Switching from one file to another is not the same really as taking a record off a turntable and putting another one on, in time delay terms.

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You've obviously not experienced it then. It is far more than that on the players I've heard with the problem often well over a second. It is probably linked with having to read from the queue what the next track to play is before it fetch data from it. I believe better players store the queue on the player whereas others store the queue on the tablet/phone.

Oh thank you. I pretty sure it is not that far from what happens.

Well you should be able to explain it then.
You might also explain why players from many japanese big names could not do gapless and got heavily criticised for this in the audio press. So much so that they had to fix it. This is going back 3 to 4 years.

I would suggest you experience what happens when you use a network player that doesn't support gapless and then you would understand.
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On 23/05/16 14:36, Bob Latham wrote:

Dunno mate. I have a DNLA server, though I never have bothered to use it to stream continuous audio. Telly uses it to play videos.
All my music is on the server, but I would normally stream via an NFS mounted volume. The players I use seem to simply stop one track and then just go on to the next.
But then they are of the 'shiny new thing make everything better*' type. They are competent bits of open source software running on Linux.
* http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/business/shiny-thing-make-it-all-better-201001282420

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On 23/05/16 15:46, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

That should of course have read 'they are *not* of the 'shiny new thing make everything better* type'
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On 23/05/16 16:03, Bob Latham wrote:

No, its apparently mostly about using compressed formats that have to be unscrambled before you can begin the playback process...
So you need to have opened the next rtrack and decoded a bit of it before the previous oine comes to an end.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gapless_playback
It all goes to show that certainly for audio, compressions is more trouble than its worth, and you can curse Apple for the I-pod.
I couldnt believe the sorts of prices heavy duty streaming boxes are.
£900 for quality that is several steps back from a CD player you can get for £50???
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You've obviously not experienced it then. It is far more than that on the players I've heard with the problem often well over a second. It is probably linked with having to read from the queue what the next track to play is before it fetch data from it. I believe better players store the queue on the player whereas others store the queue on the tablet/phone.

Oh thank you. I pretty sure it is not that far from what happens.

Felt the need to pull rank when you obviously haven't any experience of the problem?
If you're a software audio and network engineer you should be able to explain it then.
You might also explain why players from many japanese big names could not do gapless and got heavily criticised for this in the audio press. So much so that they had to fix it. This is going back 3 to 4 years.

I would suggest you experience what happens when you use a network player that doesn't support gapless and then you would understand.
Google it, plenty of articles on there and way, way more than 1ms.
Bob.
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On 09:29 23 May 2016, Bob Latham wrote:

Can someone advise me because I think I'm not quite grasping something here.
Is gapless audio the same as hearing a series of music tracks with no silence for a few seconds between them?
If so then why is it so important? Vinyl albums and CDs nearly always had gaps between tracks and that's what I grew up on, so gaps seem normal to me.
I don't want to be an old fogey but is the removal of those gaps going to make much of a difference to the listener?
Is there more than this to gapless audio that I'm overlooking?
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On 24/05/16 10:35, pamela wrote:

A bit apparently. Ive not much knowledge of it directly, cos I never was an MP3 person, sticking to CDS. But some players will finish one track, then load a bit of the next track, decompress it and then start playing and that is a reasonable delay apparently, depending on the actual stored format and the machine., There are sometimes apparently clicks in between
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A very wise choice, mp3 and m4a music files are the work of the devil.

Nothing wrong with flac.
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On 24/05/16 10:35, pamela wrote: someone advise me because I think I'm not quite grasping

Yup.

Folks may rip entire club music CDs to multiple MP3s, them that contain music with tracks that normally transition into those following. A 2-second silent space appearing between them would be the equivalent of putting on the handbrake while changing lanes on the motorway...
If that doesn't apply to your style of music, then the whole gapless concept is a non-issue.
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