Load for a 5amp wall socket

I have alongside some normal square pin 13 amp sockets some 5 amp round pin sockets, the 13 amp works as normal but the 5 amp is switched on from a light switch located elswhere.
The round sockets were installed maybe late 90s in an 80s house by the previous owners, I was advised by an electrician that this was an old format of being able to switch on table lamps from a light switch rather than the wall socket.
I have no idea which circuit they are on ie socket ring or lighting ring.
Now my question, I have recently purchased a 20 watt LED external floodlight that comes with a 13 amp square plug, now I need to increase the length of the cable and was looking to put a 5amp round plug on it at the same time so I can use from the unused round pin socket.
Will this be safe to do so? With regard to Amps/wattage etc
Secondly I may purchase another 10 watt floodlamp so would it be ok to run both from that 5 amp socket?
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5 amps is about 1200 watts, so a 20 watt load would presnt no problem. I'm slightly puzzled as to how you are going to feed your outside light from an indoor socket. Do you really want the light to be switched on from where the present switch is located?
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On 26/07/2014 22:52, charles wrote:

Drill a hole through the wooden window frame and feed the cable through. The socket and the light switch that turns it on are ideal. In fact the floodlight is only likely to be on during winter if I have a need to enter the garden shed and hols it wont be used often. The floodlight does have a PIR.
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On Saturday, July 26, 2014 10:38:22 PM UTC+1, ss wrote:

modern, not old

presumably lighting

20w @240v = 0.08A. 5A 240v = 1.2kW, so well within its ability :)
Someone else can moan about RCDs, but it shuld be fine.
NT
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On 26/07/2014 22:52, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

"presumably lighting"
Knowing this house probably the electric shower circuit :-)
"modern, not old"
Ah! full circle again seemingly this was how they done it when electricity was first introduced in to homes, so I was told.
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On Saturday, July 26, 2014 11:05:26 PM UTC+1, ss wrote:

d
er

ng.

e
5A round pin sockets are an ancient design, but they weren't normally run v ia a light switch in times past. However with few rules people could have d one almost anything. Nowadays its standard practice, albeit not very popula r, to put 5A skts on lighting circuits. Modern sockets must have shutters.
NT
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ss wrote:

One flat I rewired I found had a socket wired in to the feed to the immersion heater switch.
jgh
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old too. It was in my parents' 1910 house.

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wrote:

Was it switched by a wall switch? Lighting sockets were common in old properties but they seldom had remote switching.
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On 26/07/2014 22:38, ss wrote:

Should be. Assuming the wiring behind the socket is correct, and there is no reason from what you say to suspect otherwise, then the theoretical maximum load is 1250 watts (1.25KW), say 1KW (1000 watts) to allow for inefficiencies.
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On 26/07/2014 22:58, Old Codger wrote:

Yes, but hang on a bit. Chances are that this socket is connected to a lighting circuit[1].
If so, that circuit will probably be protected by a 5amp fuse or 6amp breaker - which will limit the *total* current in the circuit. So, even though the round-pin socket itself may be rated at 5amps, how much it can *actually* safely deliver will depend on what else is on the circuit. Drawing 5amps from it may well trip the circuit if there are lots of other lights on it.
Having said that, I'd be very surprised if adding two 10watt loads would cause any problems.
[1] The OP really needs to determine which circuit it's on - either by tracing the wiring or by pulling all the fuses/breakers and then turning them back on one at a time, and seeing what works and what doesn't each time. [Every D-I-Y-er should document their electrical installation in this way in order to know where to look when something stops working - quite apart from knowing which fuse to pull when working on a particular part of the system.]
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On Sat, 26 Jul 2014 14:52:06 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

the

old

Quite, had a couple fitted in the snug during the major refurb.

lighting

I would assume so as well but one the OP has something powered from them it's POP to find out.

Only that if the lighting is RCD protected having something outside runs the risk of when it goes leaky plunging the place into darkness.
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I believe that NT meant the outside light, under the 17th edition regs may be required to have RCD protection. In this case I do not believe that it does not require RCD protection.
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ARW wrote:

Couldn't you not express yourself less unclearly?
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In this case I do not believe that it requires RCD protection.:-)
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I assume these are the old type sockets with no fuse? Personally, I'd not chance it. After all where is the over current protection if things go belly up?
I used to have some 3 pin 5 amp plugs and sockets, which had a fuse in them, very little things, I don't think one can get them any more. Brian
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Brian Gaff wrote:

In the consumer unit. If they're on the lighting circuit it's likely to be a 5 or 6 amp radial circuit. You can still buy the BS546 plugs and sockets, I use them for exactly the same purpose, wall mounted sockets for table lamps or lighting under kitchen cupboards switched from the same wall switch as the ceiling lights.

MK make fused and unfused round pin plugs, to meet the regs the 15A can't be supplied with a 13A fuse, so are supplied with 5A.
<http://neweysonline.co.uk/-/1050078117/ProductInformation.raction
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On 27/07/2014 09:12, Andy Burns wrote:

The 5 amp socket I intend to use does have shuttering. Another quesion: Does it matter that the light switch is also a dimmer switch (re 20watt outdoor floodlight LED with PIR)
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ss wrote:

It doesn't matter to the plug, socket or wiring, but unless the LED says it's dimmable it won't run off a dimmer switch, even then you are likely to need an LED specific dimmer, the load will be too low for most "normal" dimmer switches.
But I doubt there are many outdoor floodlights that *are* dimmable ...
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On Sunday, July 27, 2014 12:55:31 PM UTC+1, ss wrote:

CR supplies used in LEDs fry rapidly on dimmer switches. Replace with a switch.
NT
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