Unearthed IEC lead.

I've just cut a bog standard IEC power lead with moulded plugs so I can shorten it. There is no earth wire, and no indication that there is no earth wire.
I'm aware that most things don't use the earth, but can this be legal?
Cheers
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Clive

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On 17/08/18 11:19, Clive Arthur wrote:

it is unless used in an appliance with a metal chassis that is connected to IEE socket earth...
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I think the point is though, without some indication to the user, we all keep a box of these leads from old devices and when we need one, maybe a little longer we just fish one out. If they are not going to be all containing an earth wire and do not show a plastic earth pin like a wall wart, how would the user know? Brian
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The Natural Philosopher used his keyboard to write :

Sorry, no it is very dangerous indeed. Supposing someone used it on an appliance which required an earth connection?
The OP said moulded on plug - was it even fitted with a fuse and were the plug pins sleeved?
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On 17/08/2018 16:17, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Yes and yes, it looks to be perfectly normal.
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On Friday, 17 August 2018 11:19:33 UTC+1, Clive Arthur wrote:

depends which tye of IEC lead it is. If it's a 3 pin connector, no. If 2 pin, yes.
NT
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On 17/08/2018 11:34, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Yes, normal 3 pin with moulded 13A plug and moulded three pin C13 IEC socket. All the usual BS approval markings, just no earth wire. Looking at the cable, it does say, among other things, 'KEMA-KEUR 300/300V 2X0.75mm2'
Of course, I don't know where it came from, it's one of many.
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On Friday, 17 August 2018 11:41:49 UTC+1, Clive Arthur wrote:

not safe & legal
NT
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I think the majority of the two core ones normally show the extra hole for the earth is blocked up. some look like a kind of glue others are obviously moulded that way, but either way, now you know you need to pump some glue in its earth hole in case its used for something else later on. Brian
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On Fri, 17 Aug 2018 11:41:46 +0100, Clive Arthur wrote:

Metal earth pin or plastic?

With a hole for an earth pin?

2x0.75mm2 = 2 core but does seem highly dubious. I'd expect a two core lead to not have a hole for the IEC earth pin making it impossible to use with a device expecting an earth. The 13A end needs some form of earth pin to open the shutters.
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Thanks for drawing our attention to the existence of such things. Apart from the potential electrocution danger, using one when expecting an earth could lead to all sorts of problems with signal circuits, including audio, and perhaps unexpected ESD problems. I am tempted to go and check all mine immediately.
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Roger Hayter

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On 17/08/2018 12:28, Roger Hayter wrote:

I have half a dozen more hanging up, they're all ok though I haven't checked the ones in use. The illegal cable is noticeably thinner than the others, at about 5.5mm diameter as opposed to 7mm.
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On Friday, 17 August 2018 12:55:54 UTC+1, Clive Arthur wrote:

I've a couple of hundred at least. yes really they are in a box in the lab, they have all passed a PAT test and visual inspection. Most are just 6 amp leads rather than kettle leads which is the name most people use when requesting one.
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It isn't one of these is it? http://electricheatingcosts.com/dangerous-13a-plugs-from-china-swegway-warning/
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On 17/08/2018 12:52, Theo wrote:

No, it looks perfectly normal and of good quality.
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Clive

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Think the regs have changed since such leads became common. All the ones I've seen these days are capable of the full rated current of the connector, regardless of how little the appliance uses. Rather the same as with many flexible chords to appliances.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Dave Plowman wrote:

With 0.7mm^2 cable, it's probably (hopefully?) only a 5A fuse in the plug.
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Aren't all flexes fitted to a 13 amp plug meant to be able to blow even a 13 amp fuse in event of a short? But not necessarily handle the full 13 amps long term?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 17/08/2018 14:21, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Could be instructive to do some sums...
If one takes the max ELI for a circuit protected by a B32 MCB as 1.44 ohms (that's the 17th edition figure before it was slightly reduced by the Cmin reductions in amendment 3).
Also lets assume the resistance of a 0.7mm^2 cable is in the order of 26 mOhms/m (1.0mm^2 CSA has a tabulated value of 18.10 mOhm/m). We can add a further 46 mOhms to the circuit total.
That gets us a ELI with a fault at the end of the lead of 1.49 Ohms.
Our prospective fault current will therefore be 230 / 1.49 = 154A
That is slightly shy of the 160A needed for a "instant" trip on the MCB,
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/File:Curve-MCBTypeB.png
so let's look at the fuse:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/images/d/da/BS1362FusingTime.png
That looks well below the 0.1 sec time on that. So lets take a pessimistic worst case of 0.1 secs.
So the remaining question is what size conductor is required to carry 154A for 0.1 sec? If we assume PVC insulation hence a k factor of 115 we get:
sqrt( 154^2 x 0.1 ) / 115 = 0.42 mm^2
So we can conclude that the flex will withstand that current for long enough to blow the plug fuse.
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Cheers,

John.
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