Lidl Drill on Thursday - Any good?

My (non-SDS) Bosch drill died last week, and I am looking for a replacement.
I was initially going to spend something in the region of £100, but as I do less DIY at the moment, I thought that perhaps the Lidl one at £40 will do. See http://www.lidl.co.uk/en/our-offers-2491.htm?action=showDetail&id3298
I am looking for something reasonably powerful, as the walls in our house are particularly tough, and for very occasional use.
Also, it appears that it comes with two chucks - SDS and "standard", which would be useful as I have never used an SDS drill, so most of my bits are standard.
Any thoughts please?
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I think it's suitability may depend on how often you use a corded drill for 'bigger jobs', inc non drilling?
If you have to have only one drill then an SDS can probably do things most non SDS's can't (better than the 'hammer' position on a non SDS fir example) but you might find it a bit big and heavy for 'ordinary' drilling jobs, like making pilot holes in wood or even drilling smaller holes through steel.
In an ideal world you would have a 'big / SDS' drill for core drills and chiseling *as well* as your std corded (for wire brushing or any prolonged high load type work), a decent battery drill (where being portable is key) and even a Demel for the smaller / finer stuff (and you can even fit other variants in between, like an air powered drill / die grinder, pillar drill, brace and bit etc). ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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If you have some difficult walls to drill then you cannot beat an SDS drill , our last house was built from over baked engineering bricks from a local brickyard, ordinary hammer drills just could not touch them. Then I got my trusty ELU and never looked back. My SDS also has a Jacobs chuck that fits in the SDS tool holder but I only use it in absolute desperation as it real ly is a kludge. The tool holders do not grip the SDS bits like a chuck, ins ert a drill bit and you can feel slight movement longitudenly. Insert the J acobs chuck and it throws the whole balance of the machine and the accuracy . If you want to use it for drilling in other materials other than brick or concrete then you are better off paying the extra and getting twist drills that have an SDS tool end and fit directly into the tool holder. SDS drill s are kind on the bits, I have a 7mm bit I bought over 20 years ago and it is still usable today despite seeing regular service.
Richard
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On Sun, 1 May 2016 22:53:50 -0700 (PDT), Tricky Dicky
Agreed.

Yup, ok in an emergency if you only have the SDS with you and then find you have to go though some metal etc.

Agreed. I think they are a bit more expensive and no so common (especially in sets) but as you say, are available and you might just need just a select few sizes (6, 8, 10mm)?

That might be a record for a drill bit! ;-)
Anyone remember these:
http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTIwMFgxNjAw/z/eVkAAOSwKtlWs1eM /$_35.JPG
My Dad had some and I did use them to reasonable success when a lad. Fairly slow going though! Funny that whilst obviously 'very old' (60's?) in concept, hand powered drills have gone back thousands of years.
What I did use the Rawlplug 'drills' more regularly for, pre 'hammer drills' was breaking any stone you came across when drilling a hole with an ordinary masonry bit and electric (or even hand) drill. One or two hits with that and hammer and you could then drill through the remains of the stone without burning the tip of your drill out (or the hole going wildly off line).
Those were the days of regular use of the brace and bit, before the advent of flat / speed drills for wood. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On 02/05/2016 10:24, T i m wrote:

Bosch SDS bits from Toolsatan - less than £2 for a 6mm.

--
Dave - The Medway Handyman

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On Mon, 2 May 2016 11:34:57 +0100, David Lang

http://www.toolstation.com/shop/p61943?table=no
But that is a masonry bit?
I thought we were talking of ordinary HSS bits but on an SDS mount (like for when you are drilling though concrete and hit a steel plate or some such)?
Cheers, T i m
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or even a reinforcing rod in a pre-cast concrete beam.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England

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wrote:

Well yes, but I'm not sure it's a good idea to drill though those. ;-)
There was something on that on TV the other day. The guy cast a 'beam' of concrete, placed it across two blocks (making a bridge), stood on it and it just collapsed. He then did another one with a bit (or bits) of Rebar (steel rod) in it and he even ended up hitting it with a sledge hammer, and whilst it may have cracked and lost bits off the side, it didn't 'break' (as in collapse from being a bridge).
The demonstration / lesson was that whilst concrete is good in compression it isn't good in tension or bending, whereas steel is good in tension (and compression / bending, if the section is correct, just that it's more expensive than concrete) but add a bit of steel to concrete and it too is good in tension and against bending (unless you drill through it of course). ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On 02/05/2016 11:55, T i m wrote:

Of course. Sorry, I though the comment meant SDS masonry bits were a bit more expensive and no so common. My bad.

If you want to use ordinary HSS bits you use the supplied chuck, but rebar isn't usually a problem with a masonry bit, it just throws the hole out of line.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman

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On 02/05/2016 10:24, T i m wrote:

God yes! I also recall enlarging a hole in brick using a chisel in a manner like your star-drill / Rawlplug drill.
Now such a hole takes minutes, not an hour of hard work!
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<snip> >> Anyone remember these:

Cool, not just me then. ;-)

Still done today, after you realise the core drill you just used is just a bit too small. ;-(

The thing is ... and accepting doing the job for someone else for money can be different from doing it for yourself for 'fun', I think that sometimes there can be more satisfaction when you have done something 'the old way', especially if that way gives you a better job etc.
I think I'm saying that sometimes it's nice to say cut a piece of wood by hand (well, using a saw <g>) and using your skills and techniques to ensure the cut is true and square etc, as there is ending up with a nice true cut after spending some time ensuring the guides on your power saw are true etc. Craftsman versus machine operator?
Now, If I had to make 50 such cuts then I know the novelty would wear off pretty fast but you get the idea. ;-)
My Dad was a pretty good d-i-y type carpenter and because I spent much of my youth 'press ganged' as his helper or just 'weight' (when sitting on wood he was cutting etc) it always amazed me to see a perfect joint when sawn by hand and maybe just finished off with a chisel or plane.
'Think thrice, measure twice, cut once' and that has saved me lots of wasted material over the years (especially with what I think is a mild for of numerical dyslexia. 1505 mm somehow becomes 1055 mm by the time I transfer the measurement to the material).
Cheers, T i m
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On 02/05/2016 14:54, T i m wrote:

When I started this handyman malarkey over 10 years ago I would always use a chop or circular saw even for a single cut. Now I use a hand saw (unless there are lots of cuts) it's a really nice feeling using a sharp hand saw and getting a spot on result.
Even better, no finding a power point, extension lead etc. By the time you've done that lot you could have finished the job.
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Dave - The Medway Handyman

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A great many (about 50) years ago, when I was starting my tool collection, I went into good tool store to buy a tenon saw. "Brass backed or steel backed?" "What's the difference?" "Brass are better, but if you don't know the difference you won't want one." It only took one job to decide I did want a brass backed one. I still have that one.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England

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On 02/05/2016 18:05, David Lang wrote:

I was brought up on old saws that needed a lot of hard work to cut anything. Last week I bought a Stanley saw for £7 and I was amazed how it could cut! And of course the price. 40 years ago you would have paid more than that.

Quite.
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On 02/05/2016 20:26, Fredxxx wrote:

I just bought a Bahco from Toolstation, about £8. It's like a razor blade, incredibly sharp.
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Dave - The Medway Handyman

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David Lang wrote:

Their 'prizecut' ones are good for finer work too.
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wrote:

OTOH a decent cordless circular saw fixes all those problems and gives a lot better result than a hand saw and much more quickly too.
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On 02/05/2016 20:50, Rod Speed wrote:

Depends entirely how how good you are with a hand saw - which is the original cordless saw. I could cut a deck board dead on square before you got the cordless out of the case.
Decent cordless saw = £300+ Decent hand saw = £8. Never runs out of charge, takes up less space, don't need to store spare batteries & charger.
--
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Nope, because it is never in a case.

Wrong again, mine is an 18V deWalt, part of a set of drill, sander, circular saw, jigsaw, torch etc, total cost quite literally $15 from a garage/yard sale, never been used at all.

Neither does my deWalt.

Wrong again.

I don’t need to either.
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On 02/05/2016 22:38, Rod Speed wrote:

So you have no respect for tools, halfwit. If not in a case the adjustments go out of kilter. No more than I expect from an incompetent halfwit.

So, apart from being an incompetent halfwit, you are a cheapskate halfwit who lies about prices.

Wow!! You have everlasting batteries? Halfwit.

Oh dear, what a halfwit! A cordless saw takes up less space than a handsaw! You take stupidity to a new level!

Wow! Not only do you have everlasting batteries, they exist in a separate space/time continuum!
Ha ha ha ha ha!
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman

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