Cordless Dril/ Impact Driver Combo

My fifteen year old Panasonic drill/driver has just died so I am in the market for a replacement. A seperate impact driver would be useful so I am looking at one of the combo packs.
What would anyone recommend? I don't want to spend silly money since it is just for DIY use but we have a large project coming up and I would rather have something worthwhile rather than just cheap.
Are the packs from the likes of Screwfix standard items or specially engineered for the retailer down to a price point?
Andrew
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On 10/07/2018 23:08, Andrew May wrote:

Buy into something that has a nice stable range of batteries that will be supported for a good few years and work in a good range of tools. I replaced my again Makita 18V NiMh combi drill and ID recently as I decided it was time to make the move to 18V LiIon...
I quite like the new Mak chargers since they have active temperature sensing and cooling. So you can stick a hot pack straight on the charger and it will blow forced air through the pack to cool it and manage the charging at the same time.

They sometimes seem to have distinct model numbers to avoid having to honour price match promises - but generally for the branded tools they are the full spec.
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John.
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On 10/07/2018 23:08, Andrew May wrote:

You can't have your cake and eat it. Buy a decent tool and every time you use it you'll be thankful.
Bill
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On 11/07/2018 04:26, Bill Wright wrote:

This is why I am soliciting opinions on what people here consider to be a decent tool. I would really rather not spend nearly £500 for something like this <https://www.dm-tools.co.uk/product.php/section/10518/sn/MILM18FPP3G502X if I do not have to. Or is that what you are suggesting that I should get? Just because it is the most expensive that I can find.
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On 11/07/2018 09:38, Andrew May wrote:

Something like a mid range Makita set would usually be a much better price. e.g:
https://www.dm-tools.co.uk/product.php/section/10518/sn/MAKDLX2131JX1
(3x3Ah batts are probably more useful that 2x5Ah in that you can work continuously if needs be)
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On 11/07/2018 10:06, John Rumm wrote:

+1. Unless you are a really heavy user, remember that the high capacity batteries have the downside of greater weight as well as price. I have an old pair of Maks that are NiCad. I've replaced the batteries with cheap clones a couple of times. But I have never flattened a good one in the time it takes the spare to recharge, only ones that are near to their end of life. (If you are working away from mains the argument for "small" batteries is slightly reduced).
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On 11/07/2018 17:27, newshound wrote:

And 3Ah, is actually a decent capacity anyway. My high end NiMH tools were only 2.8Ah, and they did plenty of work on a charge.
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On 12/07/2018 00:05, John Rumm wrote:

Indeed. The Panasonic that I am replacing is 3.4Ah and has always done me fine - until recently.
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Amp hour of course isn't everything. Depends on the voltage how much work it can do. Hence many drills now being 18v rather than 12v.
--
*I don't suffer from insanity; I enjoy every minute of it.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 12/07/2018 15:22, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I had to take the 12v Milwaukee back, and got 18v.
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On 12/07/2018 12:10, Andrew May wrote:

I would have thought that 3ah batteries are fine for DIY work, particularly with brushless tools which are more efficient (I am told!).
I was intrigued to find that my new drill is barely more powerful than the old NiCd one it's replacing.
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On 11/07/2018 10:06, John Rumm wrote:

That wasn't one that I was considering. I was merely using it as an example to challenge Bill's apparent assertion that one should spend as much as possible.
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It's a decision only you can make. Is a cordless drill from Lidl at £40 going to be good enough for most DIY - given it has a 3 year warranty? Or is it better to pay 3 times that for a top brand?
Or would three cordless Lidl drills for the same money actually be more useful? For those repetitive tasks where you're continually changing bits?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 12/07/2018 12:09, Andrew May wrote:

Indeed I realise that, however my link was to something that was "high end" enough to satisfy most users - but dropped some of the pricey add ons that might be of more interest to contractors looking to reduce the number of times some scrote pinches the tools out of the van!
My logic is that if you are buying a decent enough tool, then it will last a decade or more. So in reality you are buying into a battery system - since they will not last as long as the tools and probably get replaced several times in the life of the tool. Going for a reasonably well known manufacturer also adds the option to expand the tools you have with relatively inexpensive "body only" tools added at a later stage.
I bought a top end Makita 18V combi in about 2003, with 3 x 2.8 Ah batts, then added a body only impact driver a bit later. Both are still going strong. I had replaced the batts once already, and they needed replacing again - so I had to think about whether it was time to move to the Li-ion, or splash out another £150 to £200 on batteries for those.
There were other things to mix into the decision for me: I had a couple of 14.4V dewalt tools (small circular saw, and angle drill), which also needed new batteries, and I was never totally satisfied with the performance of those - especially in the saw.
Lastly there were some tools that I would like to have the option of adding, but the choice of new tools for the old Mak battery system (that they used for decades) was diminishing.
So it made sense for me to flog the DeWalt kit (and the new owner bought some "compatible" batts for it), and invest in a new twin pack of drill and ID. Then add a saw and angle drill. All in all it cost more than twice what it would have cost to just replace the batts, but I gained much more flexibility and a significant improvement in performance from the saw and angle drill. Everything now plays with the same batteries which makes life much easier.
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John.
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On 12/07/2018 12:09, Andrew May wrote:

You're putting words in my mouth.
Anyway, do you really need cordless? Mains are far far better value and much more powerful. My £100 700W hammer drill is far better than my £400 36V cordless.
Bill
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It's very difficult to run a mains drill if you've just removed the consumer unit to fit a new one
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from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
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wrote:

But you don't know that the OP's major project involves doing that and it doesn't make a lot of sense to have just a cordless drill and no mains drill even if it does. Makes more sense to have a cheap cordless drill from Lidl etc just for that.
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On 12/07/2018 21:22, charles wrote:

Not unless you are totally lacking in imagination and resourcefulness.
1. Make a temporary connection after the meter to a temporary 13A socket 2. Use a generator 3. Use the 2kW inverter in the van 4. Use power from another supply.
I wouldn't want to be doing that job with no mains available anyway. I like a good floodlight when I'm mucking about with wires.
Bill
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+1
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 13/07/2018 10:54, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

It makes the blue flashes less noticeable.
Bill
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