Cooker gas connection

Hi all
What's the current thinking on the best method for sealing the connection at the 'gas in' connector and bayonet hose on a gas cooker.
1 turn of appropriate PTFE or compound/paste ?
Cheers
Jim
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Jim wrote:

I always use a couple of turns of gas PTFE then test with dilute Fairy.
Si
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Jim wrote:

You mean the threaded connection on the cooker itself that the hose connects to? Gas PTFE, and a test with leak detector spray.
--
Cheers,

John.

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John Rumm wrote:

Bayonet connector could do with a wipe of kitchen oil. I wrongly connected our hob with a flex hose and I have had problems (not many) with it. And kitchen oil has cured it. It is secure now, until I put the piping right.

Are those gas detector sprays any good?
As I may have said before, I have worked with many gasses that are much more dangerous than North Sea gas. My standard method for leak detection was along your lines. A bit of washing up liquid and some water. But on its own, it can't detect tiny leaks, or even not tiny leaks.
My method was to surround the joint with a collar of foam by agitating the brush around the joint, until it had a collar of foam bubbles around it.
If you can't get a collar, then you have quite a large leak. The escaping gas is blowing the bubble apart before you can see it
If you get a collar, then you have to look out for tiny leaks by observing the bubbles. Any growth means that you have a leak. You will need a mirror to do this and a bright light.
Take care if you are not certain what you are doing.
Dave
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Dave wrote:

They are ok, although some work better than others IME... not as good as a pressure drop test with a manometer obviously. The main advantage of washing up liquid is you know they should not be corrosive for any of the components.
--
Cheers,

John.

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Washing up liquid is very corrosive for iron parts.. nearly all of it uses salt as a thickening agent. Its best to wash it off.
Its why you don't use washing up liquid to wash cars.
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dennis@home wrote:

yup, typo, sorry.
--
Cheers,

John.

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John Rumm wrote:

You meant the main advantage *over* WUL, presumably?
--
Andy

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Andy Wade wrote:

Indeed...
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Cheers,

John.

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John Rumm wrote:

Sorry, that ought to be "advantage *over* washing up liquid"
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John.

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