Gas cooker connection

Been looking online for an answer to this - found conflicting information.
If my cooker has a bayonet connection, can I disconnect it for a day (while I do my new floor) and put it back on myself?
Is this safe or not?
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Well I ahve found na odl thread that suggests its ok, so ill risk it!
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Well I ahve found na odl thread that suggests its ok, so ill risk it!
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On Fri, 04 May 2007 22:50:06 +0100, Mo wrote:

Yes: that's (sort of) what they're intended for. (Actually I suppose it's more for cleaning behind the cooker.) When you put the cooker back make sure the stability device still works. This may be a sort of L-shaped metal bracket fixed to the wall or floor that loosely engages in the back of the cooker so that when the cooker is pushed back into its working position it prevents it being tipped forward. Alternativey it may be a chain fixed to the cooker and the wall. If neither is present there should be one, and it must of course be fitted by a 'competent person'
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Regs#Statutory Instruments
--
John Stumbles

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ARGH!
OK, I had a look - the one we have is pretty old and gettign green mould on it - after putting soem effort in I got it out - I put it back in. Spark up the cooker and it all seemed fine.
Its back on now - however there is nothing holding it to the wall - there IS achain on there tho but not connected to anything - tho I don't see how anyone could install it given the chain is so short.
I might try and get someone in tomorrow after I get my floor done to check it.
Can I do a test for gas leaks? I heard somethign about some yellow tape...? What could happen if the cooker leans forward?
There is a hole of sorts on the floor - it sticks out (I'll have a closer look in a min) - maybe that is the device to stop the lean?
Cheers
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The hole in the ground seems to be an old pipe or something...?
The cooker itself is massive and there is no chance of it leaning forward unless something put massive force on it.
While I am here..:D - Could I do any damage whilst moving the cooker tomorrow to take it out of the kitchen - may have to lift it as it will not drag well - is it best not to tilt it too much etc?
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The hole in the ground seems to be an old pipe or something...?
The cooker itself is massive and there is no chance of it leaning forward unless something put massive force on it.
While I am here..:D - Could I do any damage whilst moving the cooker tomorrow to take it out of the kitchen - may have to lift it as it will not drag well - is it best not to tilt it too much etc?
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Mo wrote:

I should worry more about replacing it afterwards - it's incredibly easy to snag a new vinyl floor with a heavy kitchen appliance and rip it, especially the thin stuff which it sounds like you're laying. Lots of heavy duty cardboard needed!
David
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Mo wrote:

If you want a confidence check that the thing resealed correctly, you could spray some soapy water over it (bit of washing up liquid and water). You would see bubbles if there is any leak. Wash with plain water after however as the washing up liquid will be slightly corrosive.

The chain should either hook onto a hook screwed into the wall, or alternatively some cookers accept an L bracket fixed to the back wall at the base of the cooker. This stops it tilting when slid back into place.

See above... (the better way is with a can of leak detector spray - available at a plumbers merchant, the best way is with a manometer connected to the test point on the gas meter). See the gas fitting FAQ for more info on that.
http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/GasFitting.html

This is referring to a (typically white) PTFE tape usually supplied on (typically) yellow reels. It is a little thicker than the stuff used on screwed connections with water pipes. It is only used on gas where you have a screwed connection that has to seal on the threads (so not compression fittings which use an olive). You don't need it to connect or disconnect a cooker hose.

The biggest risk from tilting is when someone falls onto an open oven door and promptly tips the content of the hob on top of them as well.

Doubt it.
--
Cheers,

John.

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John Rumm wrote:

The problem with doing it this way is that if the leak is big enough, it will not blow a bubble that you can see. It will have blown the soapy water away quicker than it can make a bubble.
The solution is to make a collar of bubbles around the joint by using a small brush. If you can make a complete collar, then you might not have a leak, but watch it carefully to see if there are any tiny bubbles adding themselves to the original collar of bubbles.
I used this way of leak detection on oxygen lines and that gas is far more dangerous than North Sea gas.
After doing as I have described, follow the instructions below.

Dave
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Dave wrote:

But you can smell North Sea gas, unlike oxygen: so if the leak is big to blow away the bubble solution wouldn't it be pretty obvious?
David
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Lobster wrote:

You would have thought so. As I said though, the best test is to do a pressure drop test. However unless you have done one before to prove the existing pipework in the house is sound you can end up chasing a problem at your cooker fittings that in reality is elsewhere!
--
Cheers,

John.

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On Sat, 05 May 2007 19:38:44 GMT, Lobster wrote:

Just to be a bit pedantic, you can't actually smell North Sea gas, as natural gas is odourless! Practically you can smell it of course, because they add a chemical smell specifically so that you'll notice leaks.
Steve W
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|!Been looking online for an answer to this - found conflicting information. |! |!If my cooker has a bayonet connection, can I disconnect it for a day (while |!I do my new floor) and put it back on myself? |! |!Is this safe or not?
Yes! that is why they produced the bayonet connection, it is foolproof.
--
Dave Fawthrop <sf hyphenologist.co.uk> 165 *Free* SF ebooks.
165 Sci Fi books on CDROM, from Project Gutenberg
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Dave Fawthrop wrote:

Is it? This fool did not find it so. I had leaks many times from them in the past.
Dave
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I bought some spray from B & Q which detects gas.
It says it will create foam if there is a leak.
Odd thing is it comes out foamy anyway (but disappears after a while) - but this coudl confuse the avg person.
I had a refillable cigarette gas tube which I used to spray some gas out and I found the detecor actually produces a different kind of foam that stays there for a little longer.
Sprayed my connection a few times and no foam showed up so I guess it is all OK.
Only thing is now the boiler isn;t producing hot water or heating up the radiators. I assume this is because the boiler was on when I switch off gas at the mains and I spose it has drained it all out - should it be good to go if I leave it overnight..?
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|!Dave Fawthrop wrote: |!
|!> |!> |!Been looking online for an answer to this - found conflicting information. |!> |! |!> |!If my cooker has a bayonet connection, can I disconnect it for a day (while |!> |!I do my new floor) and put it back on myself? |!> |! |!> |!Is this safe or not? |!> |!> Yes! that is why they produced the bayonet connection, it is foolproof. |! |!Is it? This fool did not find it so. I had leaks many times from them in |!the past.
They have always worked fine for me, never the slightest smell of gas.
--
Dave Fawthrop <sf hyphenologist.co.uk> 165 *Free* SF ebooks.
165 Sci Fi books on CDROM, from Project Gutenberg
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