Bayonet gas cooker connection

Just about to buy a cooker with a gas hob. We currently have an all-electric one. There is a gas pipe bayonet thingy behind our cooker, but it hasn't been used in over 15 years (maybe never). Is there anything that might need attention before we try to attach the new cooker? Clean, lubricate, etc. Ta.
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Grumps wrote:

It might not even be live, or if it is might be undersized (possibly adequate for the cooker on its own, but not for cooker plus boiler).
Google for Ed Sirett's most excellent gasfitting FAQ on this group and pay particular attention to acceptable means of using flexible hoses, testing for leaks and pressure, and requirement for safety bracket or chain to fix the cooker to the wall.
It may be that the manufacturer's instructions do not permit using a bayonet connector and hose anyway.
If the gas point is live and suitable, it shouldn't cost much to have a CORGI registered gas fitter come and connect the cooker up.
Owain
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Owain wrote:

A few months ago Comet wanted 80 + VAT.
Dave
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david lang wrote:

That'll be 40 to Comet and 30 to the fitter, probably.
Owain
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Grumps wrote:

Check/clean bayonet, make sure socket is facing downwards and pipework properly supported.
Check ventilation for cooker is OK (IIRC the spec is in the building regs).
Make sure clearances around and level of cooker are OK (ditto).
Check/fit stability device (chain or L-bracket).
Fit hose to cooker using appropriate sealant (e.g. Boss white, or gas-type PTFE applied in the correct way). Make sure hose will hang freely and not subject to damage in any way.
Pressure-drop test gas installation to make sure bayonet connection is OK and cooker doesn't leak internally.
Check cooker works OK (manufacturer's installation/commissioning instructions should give procedure). For a hob it'll basically be that the controls work OK, flames look OK at all settings and don't go out or noticeably affected (can check working pressure to confirm) with newly-installed combi running at full hot-water flow at the same time. If there's a hob lid check that gas goes off and flames go out when lid is lowered.
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On Mon, 05 Dec 2005 00:10:57 GMT, John Stumbles wrote:

All from http://www.bes.co.uk
--
Nigel M

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On Mon, 05 Dec 2005 00:10:57 +0000, John Stumbles wrote:

Agree with all that, but check the gas pipes for leaks before you add the cooker since you may, unknowingly, have a leaking installation/boiler before you begin.
--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk
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