Connecting polypipe to lead pipe

House has old lead pipe water main. This needs extending (with polypipe) to new position within kitchen extension.
Plumber says this is difficult if the old pipe isn't circular enough to
attach the connector he has in mind.
Isn't there a connector which could be soldered to the lead pipe side, somewhat irrespective of its exact profile?
[My preference is to polypipe all the way to the water meter in the pavement, but that involves digging up (and reinstating) rather a lot of concrete path. As well as presumably getting the Water Company involved.]
ps The water company previously tested the potable supply for lead, and declared it so low it probably wasn't a lead pipe anyway. Ho Hum.
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Mine is lead, but I think the water hardness has in fact plated the inside of it with limescale. Just inside what would have been the larder is a join to copper which looks like two kind of indentations just after the join. I suspect its some kind of soldered sleeve. It predates our residency, but there are signs of it being replaced, so it was probably lead all the way up to the first floor at least originally. Brian
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That's my guess here, too.

Yes the existing plumbing was (as it turns out) Pb to a stopcock under the original sink, and then copper onwards and upwards. [The latter never being in dispute]
The only other possibility was a black polypipe, which I didn't think was a thing, but I got outvoted by the baying masses, who turn out to be not sufficiently informed observers.

The problem is the old stopcock is no longer within the footprint of the kitchen units in the proposed remodelled (extended) kitchen.
It needs moving about three feet sideways.
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Roland Perry wrote:

Maybe the plumber has run out of moleskin?
There is a lead-loc compression connector that might be useful to fit a short run of copper between the lead and MDPE?

mole?

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The MDPE has been installed (in a huge rush the day before lockdown) between the proposed new stopcock location and outside the house adjacent to the original lead piping.

That would get it under the pavement from my property to the meter, but I am not that enamoured with my concrete front path anyway. There's about 20m of life-expired slab.

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On 30/04/2020 08:40, Andy Burns wrote:

Yup! A *real* plumber would bell out the end of the lead and make a sweated joint to a short length of 22 mm copper. I wonder if they have to use lead-free solder for that these days?
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You don't use solder. You use special bits of lead. Whether this is an alloy rather then pure lead I don't know, but it's not solder as generally found. Let alone lead free!
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On 30/04/2020 10:52, Roger Hayter wrote:

It specifically needs to be a proper old school plumbers solder (typically something like an 80/20 lead/tin alloy).
That is well away from the eutectic point and so has a wide temperature range between solid and fully liquid. It gives plenty of working time while its in a "plastic" state, and can be tooled into shape.
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Thanks for the correction. On reflection, I have no doubt that is what the plumbers' merchant gave me! And of course it is used to create a 3D shape rather then just forming a layer between two mechanically interlocked objects. Although the joined pipes do have to overlap, whether both or only one is lead, AFAIK. Was the same alloy used to join two lead pipes?
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On 30/04/2020 15:12, Roger Hayter wrote:

Yes, or to repair a split or a hole.
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On 30/04/2020 15:12, Roger Hayter wrote:

IIUC, yup...
I think the only time you would try to actually "weld" lead (i.e. using just lead as a filler rather than solder), is when lead "burning"[1].
Having tin in the alloy lowers the melting point to below that of the pure lead.
[1] Typically on roof work etc, where you are in effect welding up seams using a very fine torch flame to soften the base metal (but not too much!), melt in the filler (same stuff, but smaller volume), and get it all to fuse nicely, while trying to avoid ending up with a big molten mess!
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Doesn't sound much of a plumber if he can't reshape lead sufficient to allow a seal to one of the available soft seal compression joints. (Most would have sweated a joint and said nothing)
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Currently I don't have a choice as he's the subby nominated by the builders. If I can make his job easier in the short term that's a win.
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Perhaps one of the typical - "I can only fit what I have in my van"
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Particularly since a "plumber" is someone who uses lead.
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from KT24 in Surrey, England
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On 30/04/2020 09:43, Cynic wrote:

Is sweating legal now for potable water supplies? I thought it had been banned quite some time ago.
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Robin
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On Thu, 30 Apr 2020 08:19:24 +0100, Roland Perry wrote:

Yes it's called a bit of copper pipe stuffed up the inside of the lead (might need flaring a bit) and a wiped joint done. A real plumber would have the skills to do that but I doubt many modern "plumbers" do.
There are modern simple fittings to join lead to copper or maybe even lead to polypipe. Provided the latter has an insert fitted as the connector will be compression.
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I've done a wiped joint from lead to a brass tube intended for the purpose (with a compression joint at the other end). Didn't look very stylish - I used wet rags rather than moleskin - but stayed waterproof. So it can't be that hard.
However in the OP's case it sounds as though MDPE to the stopcock would be the most reliable thing to do.
Parenthetically, my old underground plastic pipe was black, I think blue is relatively recent innovation.
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Yes, almost certainly. When I put a waterpipe in our garden about 40 years ago, black was all there was - and it was quite difficult to find a stockist. It's still there and not leaking.
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from KT24 in Surrey, England
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On Thu, 30 Apr 2020 10:44:48 +0100, Roger Hayter wrote:

I don't know how recent - ours was replaced in '92 and is blue. That's only 28 years and a poster down-thread says black 40 years ago. An Anglian Water chap said that MDPE is used because HDPE is too expensive - this must have been 15+ years ago, so is the black pipe HDPE?
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