I messed up. Now I need to screw into particle board.

I bought a sliding barn door that was the right width but a bit too tall. The bottom has a groove for a guide, so in order to shorten the door, I cut a couple inches off the top. The trouble is, I cut off the hardwood at the top of the door that the roller assembly screws into and now all that's left is the particle board interior. The particle board isn't strong enough to hold the weight of the door on the rollers. So... I need to figure out how to attach the rollers to the top of the door, with only particle board to screw into. (In retrospect, I clearly should have cut extra height off the bottom - too late now.) I'm wondering if I drill holes, fill them with epoxy, and then set the screws in place if that will be strong enough. Thoughts?
Here is the door for reference: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Masonite-36-in-x-84-in-Melrose-Solid-Core-Primed-Composite-Interior-Barn-Door-Slab-with-Sliding-Door-Hardware-Kit-47590/206193108
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On Tue, 04 Jul 2017 22:44:07 GMT, Dave

Ouch! That is an expensive mistake. If you saved the piece you cut off, you could use a strong, resin type wood glue and try to glue it back in place. For additional strength you could glue dowels and or biscuits into both pieces before assembling.
Posting a few pictures of what you are dealing with would probably help the group, help you.
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On Tuesday, July 4, 2017 at 6:55:30 PM UTC-4, Stormin' Norman wrote:

IDK if there is some trim that would hide the boo boo, if there is then that would work. Otherwise I don't see that he has anything to lose by trying his idea. I'd put epoxy under the brackets too.
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On Tuesday, July 4, 2017 at 7:23:25 PM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

Construction adhesive would be a choice too.
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On 07/04/2017 5:44 PM, Dave wrote: ...

Cut off that much more that the present cutoff gives correct overall height. Glue that back to the top; using some biscuits or dowels for some extra glue surface area wouldn't hurt.
Or, just rip the hardwood off the cutoff and glue it on where it was and trim the bottom for the height.
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On Tuesday, July 4, 2017 at 6:44:12 PM UTC-4, Dave wrote:

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On 7/4/17 6:44 PM, Dave wrote:

Is there a hardwood strip on the "bottom" of the door ? If so, could you just turn it "upside down" ?
OR instead of using wood screws, uses a bolt, washers & nut thru a hole drilled thru the door
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On Tue, 04 Jul 2017 22:44:07 GMT, Dave

Saw a slot in the top of the door 3/4" wide and as deep as your blade will go. Glue a piece of hardwood in there, screw into that. Perfect would be a dado blade in a table saw but you could do it with a circular caw and the fence. Set it to cut the outsides of the 3/4" slot first then eat out the middle. Start smaller than 3/4 and sneak up on it. Clamp 3-4" of material to the side of the door, even with the top to get a stable base to work from. Laid flat and clamped on a table or the bench, hang the fence from the top surface with your clamped "base" on the bottom using the wide side of the saw plate against it. Just be sure everything is stable before you start the saw.
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On Tuesday, July 4, 2017 at 7:34:19 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

A router would probably be the better choice for cutting the dado.
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On 7/5/2017 5:49 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Better be a big router ... at least 1/2" collet , and if I were doing this I'd probably hog most of it out with a circular saw and just finish the slot with the router . At a minimum a couple of 2x4's clamped on to give the saw and router bases some stability . The OP might be able to clean the slot up to the outer veneer layers , clean up the wood strip he cut off and glue it back in . I've done this with hollow core doors with good results .
--
Snag
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On Wednesday, July 5, 2017 at 8:29:14 AM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:

Any decent router with a 1/2" collet could handle this.
Multiple shallow passes with a 2" cut length straight bit will get the job done, assuming he actually needs the full 2". There are 1.5" cut lengths also. I recently bought a 5/8" bit with a 1.5" cut length to route out a 3/4" recess for a deck of cards in a cribbage board I made. With the 1/2" template for the recess, I needed at least 1.25".
http://i.imgur.com/ouehBqf.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/vooVWFE.jpg
I would expand on your 2x4 support idea and build a jig with a straight edge for the router to follow.
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On Wed, 5 Jul 2017 07:51:18 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
I was assuming this guy did not have as big a shop as "Norm". ;-)
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On Wed, 05 Jul 2017 12:09:34 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Hey, I simply suggested that he install dowels and use glue. It doesn't really matter, it appears the OP has vanished and I doubt he has the jig required to accurately install dowels, let alone cut a 3/4" slot and install a spline.
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On Wednesday, July 5, 2017 at 12:15:03 PM UTC-4, Stormin' Norman wrote:

17 hours since the first post and you assume he's vanished? Maybe he has a job that doesn't allow him to post all day.
Why do you doubt that he can do the work? If he doesn't have a doweling jig, he can buy one for for $30-$90 depending on how much he plans to use it in the future. If he doesn't have a router, he can buy one. It's an extremely useful tool. I have 3. If he's never cut a slot and/or installed a spline, does that mean he'll never be able to?
Other than the fact that he screwed up the first cut (who hasn't?) how are you able to access his skill-set, or more importantly, his ability to learn? I've been playing around with home repair and woodworking for many years and I'm still learning new stuff. That's one of the reasons I do it. I like the journey. Apparently, the OP does too since he took it upon himself to cut the door in the first place.
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On Wed, 5 Jul 2017 09:43:58 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Oh good, the first pissing contest of the day, whoo-hoo.
Yes, I suspect he has vanished, you can speculate until the cows come home, but as of now, he has not returned.
As for all your other points, yes, some people are capable of learning new things and buying all kinds of tools, etc. However, if he had the motivation required, it is my opinion he would have been participating in the discussion beyond the initial post and sooner than this point in time. It seems many people who post through the home owners hub, never follow-up.
Also, the idea of cutting a slot and installing a spline seems needlessly complicated when one can install dowels using a jig, a pencil, a drill, a mallet and some glue. The foundational principles of proper engineering include keeping solutions as simple as possible while attaining the desired end result.
Lastly, considering the door is 1.38 inches thick, with masonite outer cladding and a particle board inner core, cutting a 3/4" slot in the inner core would either eliminate the particle board or dramatically weaken it. Not only does a long slot seem pointless, but it would likely further damage the remaining structural integrity of that end of the door. Removing as little material as possible seems to be the most logical approach when trying repair this kind of a cluster-fuck.
Did I satisfy your need for pissing contest? I have horses to feed and a solar array to pressure wash.
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On Wednesday, July 5, 2017 at 1:20:04 PM UTC-4, Stormin' Norman wrote:

I don't even see the need for a jig. He can just clamp the two pieces back together, drill holes in from the top, put it together with glue or construction adhesive and dowels. But it also looked to me like the roller part on top had wide brackets and his idea of drilling holes, using glue, adhesive, to help anchor the screws plus putting in under the metal brackets, would bond it too, without attaching the original piece that he cut off.

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On Wed, 5 Jul 2017 10:25:23 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

Maybe, but he didn't say how much he cut off. As I think he only really has one shot at making the repair, and knowing how difficult it can be to accurately freehand drill, multiple, relatively deep holes, I would urge him to use a self-centering doweling jig, like this one from HF. $15 is a relatively small investment to insure he doesn't create another CF and run the drill through the outer surface of the masonite.
https://www.harborfreight.com/self-centering-doweling-jig-41345.html
As it is, I think he only has a 50/50 chance of effecting a functional repair with expending excessive time and resources. And, let's face it, the door sounds like a piece of crap anyway.
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On Wed, 05 Jul 2017 17:37:19 +0000, Stormin' Norman

CORRECTION: "Without expending..."
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On Wednesday, July 5, 2017 at 1:37:34 PM UTC-4, Stormin' Norman wrote:

Not sure what the need for accuracy is. If he clamps part A to part B and drills a 3" deep hole, even if the hole is at an angle, it doesn't matter, the dowel will still go in, no? Plus you have construction adhesive/glue between the two also. And I'd make sure the bracket screws are long enough to go through both parts too.

I'd think he has a higher chance than that. But agree I'd keep it simple and cheap.
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On Wed, 5 Jul 2017 11:10:38 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

I am just not sure how he would clamp the two pieces together, securely, at the end of a 7 foot door. Yeah, I guess he could use pipe clamps or ratcheting straps, but somehow, I don't think that would be as easy as just using the jig. Maybe you are right, but with all of the furniture I have built over the years, freehand drilling of dowel holes never produced flush joined edges.

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