Why wood prices are going up

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On Fri, 19 Sep 2003 02:21:36 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Bruce) wrote:

Did you know that you can buy a decent four seat aircraft for less than what many soccer moms pay for an SUV? <G>
That 35-40k plane will hold it's value much better than the SUV, as it's already had some depreciation, and will probably outlast the SUV to boot.
Another friend and myself are currently looking in the 45-50k range for a plane to go halves on.
Barry
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In rec.woodworking

Of course an SUV doesn't require expensive annual maintenance by certified AP mechanics, hanger storage fees etc. Very few "poor" people own planes. I wouldn't even consider it and my salary has 6 digits in it.
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On Fri, 19 Sep 2003 13:25:44 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Bruce) wrote:

$1500 +/-

$40 / month for an outside tie down w/ key card access.

Nor do they own boats, R/V's, race cars, vacation homes, custom motorcycles, horses, or really nice in ground swimming pools, but many "average" folks I know do.

You payz your money... <G>
Barry
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Barry Burke responds:

And damned few poor folks own SUVs. Too bad ownership hasn't remained confined to people will to take them where they belong, off-road.
Charlie Self
"Patriotism is not short, frenzied outbursts of emotion, but the tranquil and steady dedication of a lifetime. " Adlai E. Stevenson
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I totally Disagree. Poor has become increasingly relative with Loans, Credit and plastic. I have known individuals with salaries close to mine (at the time mine was 8 and hour theirs wasn't more than 10-15) Running around in brand-new shiny something's that would take them 6 years to pay off. As for Planes, boats, etc. They are all hobbies. Just as you might spend 3 grand a year feeding your WW habit. Some just spend that on flying or boating. Besides, not many of you buy a Powermatic with your two neighbors. If you consider what I paid so I could make/build stuff (apparently I haven't gotten much further than a hobby for the most part) with an education, the flyers still come out on top even with training/license.
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Young Carpenter

"Violin playing and Woodworking are similar, it takes plenty of money,
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B a r r y B u r k e J r . wrote:

Dad and I just read the Popular Mechanics article talking about how the FAA is relaxing restrictions, and how many cheap airplanes are out there now... :)
It's sort of exciting, and gets the ol' daydream motor running. OTOH, he went through a flying thing back when I was in high school. He eventually lost interest because there are almost no VFR days, and the other members of the club he joined were having to ditch the plane, rent cars and drive home (then drive back for the plane) in order to avoid getting stuck for some unknowable time in BFE.
I've been looking at the sky and thinking about this since then, and he's right. Not that it really matters to me anyway. $40,000 might as well be $500 quadrillion for all the likelihood that I could come up with it.
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On Sat, 20 Sep 2003 01:37:16 -0400, Silvan

That's why I'm going halves. While it's still money, 20-25k is more in my ball park. I've done business dealings with the other guy before, so the partnership detail is easy. My wife and I have become accustomed to living below our means, so stuff like this is now possible.
I've taken lessons on and off for years, as has the other guy. I was previously renting aircraft @ $65-70 wet, plus about $25 for the instructor, per hour. A twenty year old aircraft doesn't depreciate very fast, so we could own it for a few years, maintain it, and still sell it for a decent price should we choose to. Owning the thing will allow both of us to build hours for much less money after soloing.
My partner used to think a plane was expensive compared to other motorized toys until he rammed one of his boat out drives into some rocks. = 8^( After that, he sat down and really did the math. Once you buy the boat, maintain it, fuel it, launch or slip it, buy SeaTow insurance, etc... It's not all that different.
Barry
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B a r r y B u r k e J r . wrote:

IIRC, under the new rules you only need 20 hours anyway. :)
More to it than hours though. Dad had 100 hours, and I don't know how many solos, but he failed the flight test two or three times. He always failed before he had even gotten off the ground. He was a skillful, natural pilot, but he couldn't get the pre-flight technicalities down pat.
He had to stop flying when I wrecked Mom's car, back in high school. He never has gotten back into it, which has been the subject of much guilt for the last 15 year or so. ;)

Depends on what kind of boat you get too. Around here we have lakes, not oceans. Sea faring vessles are a whole 'nother ballgame, but even bass boats can really set you back. One of my neighbors is a 22-year-old kid with the right good ol' boy connections to luck into a primo job. He makes as much money as I do, has no wife, no kids, no house, no rent (lives with his parents) and a $40,000 bass boat.
I'd rather have an airplane.
But really, if I had $40,000 to spend, I'd want a huge ass shop chock full of big, three-phase power toys. :)
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I bet his bills to fix that boat will be a lot less than fixing your plane if you crash. In the event of an accident, his survivability rate is higher than yours too.
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CW wrote:

Probably true, but boats, planes, motorcycles, they're all three toys only for the suicidally reckless.
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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Being a rather serious motorcyclist, member of the Iron Butt Association and having ridden many thousands of miles safely I must take exception to your generalising. I am neither reckless nor do I possess any suicidal tendencies. Stick to analysing what you know about.
John Emmons

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wrote:

Probably, that's why most pilots are much more careful than boaters. <G>
I can get just as hurt or killed bombing my mountain bike down Mt. Snow at 60 MPH, but I still do it.
Barry
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In rec.woodworking

I was in a hanger today of the Commemorative Air Force. They had a sign that said, "There are old pilots. There are bold pilots. There are no old, bold pilots."
:)
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On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 04:02:43 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Bruce) wrote:

An oldie but a goodie.
How many boaters run checklists every time they use the boat, with another checklist each time the boat is docked or released, and yet another when it's parked for the day?
I'll bet pleasure boats have exponentially more mechanical failures and accidents, per hour operated, than small aircraft.
I've also seen two, widely varying types of personalities between the typical private pilot and the typical pleasure boater. Anyone who thinks the typical private pilot has suicidal tendencies and is a daredevil has been watching too many movies.
Barry
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"B a r r y B u r k e J r ."

I've done both. Pilots are a very serious lot when it comes to caring for their equipment and doing the pre-flight. Too often, the only thing boaters check is that there is enough beer in the cooler. Fortunately, that is starting to change and safety courses for boating are mandatory in many states. . Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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wrote:

A healthy bill from SeaTow can also cause a major attitude adjustment.
Barry
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B a r r y B u r k e J r . wrote:

Oh, don't worry, I feel the same about everybody who rides as a passenger on one of those things too. I used to fly with Dad, and ride on his motorcycle, but that was when I was young and had no sense of my own mortality.
Before I had the really horrible car wreck IOW. The one that could have been so very much worse than it was, which was so completely beyond my control. I didn't get injured, and neither did the other guy, but if the angles or velocities had been the slightest bit different, one or both of us would have been brutally mangled. It completely killed my spirit of adventure.
Now I'm just a big ol' chickenshit, and I won't ride in anything with less than four wheels, or anything that puts me more than eight feet off the ground.
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kept it for around 6 years, took on another partner then sold the plane for a health profit. I logged around 250 hours and got my instrument rating. When we sold the plane it pretty much covered my entire cost of owning and flying the plane - basically, we owned it for free (if you don't count the labor doing some of the maintenance and grunt work on annuals etc). The only drawback is that you have to put out the money during that time and it can get expensive. It hurts to pay out a couple thousand for maintenance items etc. Good luck - hope you enjoy it.
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I hadn't heard about prices coming down. I have been wanting a small plane for a loooong time. Something like a Cessna 150 or 172 or the like. I have a buddy that lives across the street from me that flys Airbus A300/600 for Fed Ex and is also an instructor pilot. I may have to do a little more checking on this. We have some gorgeous flying weather where I live.
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wrote:

Check around, it may be more affordable than you'd think.
Barry
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