Which drill press to buy?

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On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 07:33:02 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote:

Head has to be trammed to the table each time its moved and likely less rigidity. Both really shouldn't be deal breakers for woodworking. They might be in the metal working world.
David Glos
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I was using my drill press tonight to drill out a mounting plate for a new motor for my lathe. Metal work- chips all over- yech!
Don't forget, one of the two words here is "press". I had to press very hard at times. I would not like a radial drill press for that type of work.
Sooner or later, I bet you will use the tool for something that requires some real "push".
I guess I could see a radial arm press as a second drill press for a busy shop.
Either way, skip the mortice attachment. Not that hard to cut them by hand with a sharp chisel.
-Dan V.

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I have a Ryobi benchtop that serves me well. I have it mounted on a rolling stand that I built. I don't need a floor model 'cause the DP is fastened on with lag screws. I can just remove them and turn the thing around with the work on the floor.
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On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 00:25:41 GMT, "Keith Boeheim"

Since you used "life long purchase," consider the following.
If you live near one being auctioned on E-bay, a Clausing variable speed (as in "continuously variable") would be the cat's meow. Don't really want to pay for shipping on such a beast. Make certain you look at the motor requirements before bidding. They came in 220/440 3 phase, as well as 110, single phase. A little lower down the food chain, but still miles above most of the far east iron is Walker-Turner. They came in various models/motor configurations too. The Clausing might end up being a bit over your price range, but a decent Walker-Turner might not.
I would post some e-bay links, but don't really want to give out too much info as I'm in the market for one myself. Stay away from any within 100 miles of Cincinnati and I will let you live. ;-)
Dave Glos
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Keith Boeheim wrote:

I haven't used a JET, but I'd probably buy the JET. I'd definitely recommend a full-sized unit if you have space and capital. You can do everything a small press can do on a big one, but not the other way around. After trading up from a benchtop to a 15" floor model, I rarely use more column travel than I had before, but when I need it, it sure is handy. It's also a much better machine overall. Bigger table, bigger chuck, bigger motor, better belt tensioning mechanism, etc.

I don't have a mortising accessory. If I were going to do something with some huge number of mortises, I'd probably buy a dedicated mortising machine. For the number I do, boring out the waste with the drill press and then cleaning up the holes with a chisel is a fine way to do things.
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On Thu, 05 Feb 2004 01:33:24 -0500, Silvan

I recently upgraded my drill press. I was using a largish bench model taiwanese 15(or so) speed machine. as far as I could tell, it was the same as the floor model, but with a shorter column. I had it for a number of years and for the most part it worked fine. there was a limited distance from the chuck to the column that I occasionally wished to exceed. I did a few things to it to improve useability- I separated the wiring for the motor from the wiring for the light, so I could leave the light on and run the motor from a foot switch. I trammed in the table to square and for the most part left it there. I made a base for it with drawers in it. it wasn't a great drill press but it was adequate. One function it wasn't able to fulfill for me was milling. after a few attempts that ended in dropping the chuck I gave up.
I started looking at mill drills. what I found is that although there are a lot of them out there, and from what I gather there are quite a few manufacturers (all SE Asia) there aren't all that many variations on the design, and all were similar in price. I figured out what features I really wanted and began looking. I was saving pennies, and figured sooner or later I'd have enough to buy new, but meantime I shopped the usual secondhand sources. I saw a few go by on ebay for prices I was willing to pay, but all of them were too far away. the local machinery junk guy said he never got them in. finally I found one in the paper. went down and looked at it and ended up buying it. it had a shop made mobile base that looks like you could stack a few trucks on top of. it came with extra collets and a stout milling vise.
basically, it's a machine tool, meant for working metal, so I suppose it's OT for this forum. however, it makes a great woodworking machine. top speed is 2500 rpm, a bit slow but the feed is so controllable that it hasn't been a problem. it has considerably more swing than the old drill press. a radial drill press would have more, but at the cost of lots of flex. it has a 2 hp motor that I doubt I'll ever slow down. it uses R8 tooling, same as the bridgeport mills, so there's lots of stuff for it. it's also heavy. I had to disassemble it to get into and out of my truck. it took 2 guys to get the head back on.
all in all it's a worthwhile addition to a woodshop     Bridger
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forth from the murky depths:

-snip-
Check out Grizzly's woodworking mill when you get ready to upgrade. They can be used to make your own hardware, too. http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?itemnumber=G9959
-snip-

I'll bet it is!
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On Thu, 05 Feb 2004 19:28:13 GMT, Larry Jaques

I looked at that. it's pretty big, both in footprint and price.
plus, it's too new to find one on the used tool market <G>
    Bridger
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