Which drill press to buy?

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This will be my first drill press and a life long purchase I think so here is the question.
A 12" depth bench top unit goes for $180 at my local Home Depot but is my just delivered Rockler advert a Jet floor mount 15" is on sale for $100 more. In the next 20 years would I be better off getting the 15" full size unit. Not ever having used one I'm just not if it is over kill. Oh, BTW this is just a hobby for stress relief. Thanks for any advise. One more thing is it necessary to have a mortising accessory or can I just use a drill/chisel combo.
Thanks
keith
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I bought a benchtop about 20 years ago, after figuring out that it wasn't enough I had to go back and buy a floor model later. If it's for the long haul, buy the best you can afford, if you can afford the Jet and it won't take food from your children's mouth or throw your wife into a rage then that would be the way to go.
Just my opinion, its worth every bit of what you paid for it.
KY
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"Keith Boeheim" < snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com> wrote in message
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Or Grizzly:
$200 G7944 12-Speed, 3/4HP, 14" Floor Drill Press http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?itemnumber=G7944
$180 G7946 5-Speed, 1/2HP, 34" Floor Radial Drill Press http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?itemnumber=G7946
Check out that second one. Radial head, 34" swing for $180!
codepath

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Delta/Jet seem to be all the same other than color...dunno about the Griz but that may come from the same far-east factories as well.
I had a 16" floor Delta and loved it. I now have the 17" floor Delta and hate it. Dial depth guage vs. treaded rod is my biggest loss (former was accurate, latter is a piece of crap that is impossible to set accurately and even then will slip past the threads on the slightest bit of pressure).
Floor vs. benchtop...the floor models usually come with 5/8' chuck, bench tops at 1/2". Believe it or not there are times where the 5/8" is needed. Speed settings between the two (probably 15 vs. 5) don't seem to matter since you can compromise on either and get the job done. Floor models can be used for alot of other stuff, i.e. when remodeling a bathroom I used it to stir the tile mortar in a 5 gallon bucket since my heavy duty drill couldn't handle the load.

$100
BTW
thing
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IIRC my Old craftsman 103.XXXX came with a 5/8" chuck. Guess some things were better years ogo. Tony D.

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Tom reported....I now have the 17" floor Delta and

Yup, same problem with my 17" Delta. I've learned to deal with it, and not crank so hard once you are approaching the final depth.
Couple observations, though, which I made while shopping and comparing this machine to the 16 1/2" Jet a couple few years back. First, most reviewers prefer the threaded rod to the dial, since the dials on Chinese drill presses are not that accurate. I'm guessing your older DP was made elsewhere. Second, at least one reviewer, if not two, observed that the Jet had problems with spindle deflection, which the delta didn't have.
One of the Jet's bigger selling points (at least at the time) was the aforementioned mortising attachment. Most experts don't suggest using this except for occasional use. Too much stress on your machine. Better off buying a $200 dedicated benchtop mortiser.
Joe
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Hi Joe
Older Delta was bought about 15 years ago so you're probably right. That "dial thing" worked great. With the newer piece of crap I guess I'll try to replace the threaded rod assembly even though I'm sure Delta will want the typical "arm and leg" for it. Replacement parts for Delta do seem to be better than what comes with the tool so maybe it will be better in the long run and I can quit cussing every time I try to drill a hole without going all the way through.
As for the various brands, I think they all have "deflection" problems but guess for the cheap prices (how can they all sell such a massive piece of machinery for under $300???) we can expect that. We are only working with wood which doesn't demand microscopic accuracy anyway. As to why any of the big names would continue to "sell" based on the mortising attachment is beyond me...PITA to set up, never very accurate, and about the time you get it right you need the DP for something else and have to take it all apart.

was
and
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On 4 Feb 2004 10:23:09 -0800,

Since I do only need a mortiser occasionally BUT was faced with a one time project that required a lot of mortises I just went ahead and purchased a smaller Delta Bench top Drill press and a Mortising attachment for it.... Rather then a dedicated Mortiser...
THIS WAS YEARS AGO..... and I can honesly say that having a second drill press in the shop all these years I made the correct decision.... I get much more use out of it then I would a dedicated machine...and for slightly less money to boot....
HOWEVER the drill press mounted Mortising attachment does work . l t is much slower, takes twice as long to cut a mortise, not nearkly as powerful etc...
Bob Griffiths
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the Grizzly would be my choice, but the next DP I get will have a speed control without changing belt position. I bought a cheap router speed control and put that on my DP, wonder if that will hurt it? LOL
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...changing the belts around is not a big deal...takes only a few seconds...I keep the speed chart taped to the wall next to the press. The instructions for the pulley alignment are under the top cover. I think letting the pulleys do the work will probably beat any type of electronic speed control, especially if it ever comes under load.

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On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 03:43:29 GMT, "Tom Kohlman"

I disagree. I have the floor model Delta, I find it cumbersome to change speeds. I wish I had bought the model with the variable width pulleys. I think I will convert my DP to a 5 speed model, flip the motor pulley, take out the middle pulley, and get a longer link belt.
Electronic speed control would be a very high end item. Not sure anyone is doing a drill press that way.
A rheostat on an AC motor would not work.
My $.02
-Dan V.
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Guess I got lucky with both of the Deltas I've owned in terms of speed change. It really only takes me seconds. Consult the chart they give you for type of material, type of bit and size, note the speed. Then open the lid, "consult" the pulley arrangement chart pasted inside for that speed or the nearest to it, loosen the locking thumb screws, turn the handle to release pressure on the belts, arrange the belts on the pulleys as the lid arrangement tells you to, tighten up the handle and then the thumb screws. What's so hard about that?
New belts can make this a little tougher but that is temporary. They stretch with use.
wrote:

The
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I'll vouch for this drill. Very good value and I haven't been able to see any quality differences between it and more expensive drill presses in its class.
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I think the next step up would be a matter of size and motor quality. I'm thinking of DP's like the Jet 17 which has TEFC motor and over 1" more Spindle travel. But it's $200 more.
Bob

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Any feedback on this Harbor Freight drill press. It looks similar to the Grizzly, but no shipping charges. http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber8144
John

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On Tue, 03 Feb 2004 17:11:27 -0800, codepath wrote:

I recently got the second one's little brother: http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?itemnumber=G7945 G7945 5 Speed 1/2HP, 34" Bench-Top Radial Drill Press, $150
My thought is to put a mobile cabinet under it to increase storage in my small shop. If I need to use it for bigger jobs, I can just swing the head around and have the full capacity to the floor. That's the plan anyway, we'll see how it works out in practice.
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Joe Wells


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Has anybody got a good reason _not_ to buy the Griz G9745 or G9746? other than "I'm not in the market for one", that is. :)
Is there a downside to the "radial" drill presses, that I'm not aware of?
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aware of?
I was very close to buying the Grizzly radial floor model, but it doesn't take a mortise attachment. I don't want to buy a separate mortising machine, so I would like to get a DP that will accept a mortising attachment.
Other than that, I have heard that after taking advantage of the radial feature, you need to be very careful to get the machine back in alignment. (it sounds like it doesn't have a positive stop at the 90 degree mark... not positive about that though)
YJJim
snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote in message wrote:

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On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 07:33:02 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) brought forth from the murky depths:

The two reasons I've heard are:
1) they flex a bit more than solid-head machines
2) they're harder to get/keep aligned vertically
But if a person is machine savvy (and a tad smarter than a pointy stick) they should be able to work around these minor problems with ease.
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On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 07:33:02 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote:

flex.
if you can find one in a showroom somewhere to get your hands on, you'll be able to tell whether or not it's too much flex for your application. it sure was for mine.     Bridger
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