Where to get accurate tape measure?

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"DonkeyHody" wrote in message

As compared to what?
Relative "accuracy" makes no difference whatsoever as long as you use the _one_ tape/measuring apparatus/story stick/marks on a board, for a project.

I use Rockler's for precision layouts marks of a "story stick" nature:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/CrftsManCh4.JPG
... IOW, once the marks are made on the "story stick" (in this case the chair leg template), it becomes "the judge" for those locations for the rest of the project and the flat tape goes back in the drawer.
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www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 1/02/07
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On Thu, 04 Jan 2007 15:57:59 -0800, DonkeyHody wrote:

The "name brand" is "Fastcap", Woodcraft, McFeelys, and just about everybody stocks them. I haven't noticed any more inaccuracy in mine than in any other tape. Note that the lie-flat tape can get bent easily for some reason.
The one guy on Amazon seems to have gotten a bad one.

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--John
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J. Clarke wrote:

I have a few versions of those, and I really like them.
I have a 16 ft. "Lie Flat", a 16 ft. "Story Pole,a nd a 25 footer. They were ~ $7, and I'd buy 'em again when these break.
I also a "CenterPoint" 16 ft. center finding tape that I really liked.
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I put very little stock in Amazon reviews. An inordinately high percentage of the reviewers seem to be deserving of the nickname "Bozo".

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I think I've read some of the same reviews. <G>
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net says...

I love when one of those 'bozos' says "This is a fantastic tool, but it was missing a minor piece, so I had the company send me a replacement, and so I give it 2 stars".
Sure it's annoying to have some minor problem that needs to be resolved, but to give a tool a low overall rating based on that is misleading.
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On Fri, 5 Jan 2007 21:06:00 -0500, Mark Blum

My favorites involve writers who have clearly never read the user manual and have no idea how to use the tool.
These are the folks who want to take 1/4" cuts in 12" wide maple with a lunchbox planer or grind welds off of steamship with a 4 1/2" finish sander and 100 grit. <G>
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Fastcap...excellent...very limp but is great for layouts on a flat surface. They also have a few more flavors...
http://www.fastcap.com/prod2.asp?page=procarp_flat
Crummy web site but excellent products...
DonkeyHody wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

Thanks guys, I think I'll give it a try.
DonkeyHody "Even an old blind hog finds an acorn every now and then."
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The slop in the hook is equal to the thickness of the hook, so that you can use the tape to measure inside and outside measurements.
Too many guys forget this and let their tape snap into the housing when bringing it into the case from its extended position. First the tape gets less accurate and then the hook snaps off. You need to feather it down as it retracts.
If you are working by yourself and always use the same measuring device, it doesn't matter how accurate the device is because it is self referent.
If you are working with other guys, like on a trim crew, it's up to the lead to take the tapes and tweak the hooks so that all the tapes measure the same.
A more accurate measuring tool is a folding rule, if it is a good one. I still have a couple of six foot and one eight foot Lufkins that are as on as they were thirty years ago when I bought them.
The best idea in making items that have repeating parts is to measure as little as possible. Set your cutting device to cut one dimension and cut every part that uses that dimension with the same setup. This is part of the beauty of a cutting list. It will help you organize your project into objects that are dimensionally equivalent and, once these are identified, you will get the repeatability that you need for your boxes to fit together right. Work from the largest pieces to the smallest and you will have a second chance to use the pieces that you butch.
Regards,
Tom Watson (Fairly Unbalanced)
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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"Tom Watson" wrote in message

The holy grail of woodworking (SQUARE) ... encapsulated in the above. Cast it in stone, ye non-believers, for they are words from the Mount!!
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TESTIFY!
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well, you're wrong and you're right. you already go brought up to speed on why the hook is loose, so I'll leave that alone.
tape measures are not high precision instruments, and they can be out enough to matter in some critical applications. pretty much the best ones on the market for most kinds of wood trades are the ones made by stanley, though most of the ones you'll find for sale for above about $8 are gonna be pretty much the same. so if you need better accuracy that a tape measure can give you, go down to the machinist's supply house and buy a nice hardened steel rule. and bring lots of cash- you'll need it.otherwise, give up on using numbers to represent distances and start using story poles. then you can be exactly as accurate as you need to be in any given situation.... and best of all, for free.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:
> well, you're wrong and you're right. you already go brought up to speed > on why the hook is loose, so I'll leave that alone. > > tape measures are not high precision instruments, and they can be out > enough to matter in some critical applications.
<snip>
This accuracy discussion brings to mind my class in surveying a long time ago.
Back then accuracy was defined to 3 decimal accuracy.
Making a 100 ft measurement with a partner, a couple of plumb bobs and a tape was a very interesting exercise.
Included with all the other variables was tape tension.
Too much tension, the tape could be made to stretch.
Too little tension, the tape would sag.
Both represented errors.
And then there were the gals would would sun bathe on the roof of the building across the street from the surveying lot, but we won't go there.
Lew
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jo_jo wrote:

Since a lot of other folks have explained inside/outside measurements to you, I'll merely ask if anyone on this group feels like researching how many times this question has come up. I can remember at least twice before, and I think both were fairly recently, but since my aging brain is creeping towards senility I'm not sure of that - my wife says it's more like running than creeping :-).
-- It's turtles, all the way down
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On Thu, 04 Jan 2007 21:57:21 -0800, Larry Blanchard

I don't recall it recently, but I do recall it coming up on the show "While you were out" where the carpenter was trying to explain it to the host, who wouldn't believe a word of it. The carpenter eventually gave up and went back to work. I think we all had to have it explained to us at some point, and we all went "duh" once we got it. But this guy was just having none of it.
-Leuf
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You could make one... http://www.colonialwilliamsburg.org/Foundation/journal/Holiday06/tools.cfm
Alternatively and easier would be to not measure with a ruler. Use a story stick. Or, use two sticks that can be laid next to each other with one end of each stick touching the inside of the sides of your case, and then place a mark across both sticks. The sticks can be laid on your stock in the same relationship to each other and the length marked on your stock...
John
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I have a nice Starrett tape measure that I trust for accuracy. But a tape measure is inherently not an accurate measuring device. I use a solid rule and something butted against the end so I know it's precisely placed, or a square.
jo_jo wrote:

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jo_jo wrote:
> Or maybe someone can tell me how to use the two I have. The hook at > the end of the tape on both of mine (and every new one I picked up at > Lowes) has about a 1/16th inch of play. In other words, measuring a > board would be 1/16th longer than measuring the hole the board fits > into.
You can always make the problem go away, use the "10" mark as "0".
Not nearly as convenient, but it has worked for me for a lot of years.
Lew
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On Sat, 06 Jan 2007 19:18:19 GMT, Lew Hodgett

Great point!
There's the old saying "burn an inch" to avoid using the hook. It's very easy to cut parts one inch short when burning an inch.
Burning 10 makes the errors very apparent before the cut!
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