when to use OSB

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It's cheap, it's pretty tough, it's great for wall and roof sheathing.
When do you use it around the shop?
I'm thinking to use it to build a sheet storage cart -- basically a plaftorm on wheels with an A-frame atop it. At $6 a sheet, seems OSB would server the purpose.
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coloradotrout wrote:

I'm not sure it's worth the savings. I used it to line a wall of the shop, because.... it's cheap.... and it takes a screw very well. For that, I'm very pleased. I've used it as a temporary work table top and would never do that again.
Keep in mind that, in general, one side grips and one side slips, by design. It's not something I'd want to be sliding hands or edges of plywood across, on the grip side.
It also splinters and chips very easily, so depending on manufacture and cutting blade, can be downright nasty to handle on a cut edge.
For your purpose, I think melamine would be better. It's smooth and clean and sheets would slide across very easily, and not mark or scratch against it.
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-MIKE-

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wrote:

My answer to the question is basically one word - NEVER.
I won't use the stuff, at any price, for anything.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in news:0ejlb5tc91vkkh098c1ne8bg8mru4v9vju@ 4ax.com:

I've got one project with any OSB at all. I used it because the drawer I was using required a sheeting-based bottom, and all the school shop had was 1x12's. It is possible to sand OSB to a nice smooth feel, but you're better off with ply for anything that is touched.
There's actually some left over OSB from an addition in the shed. It's free (well, already paid for), but still hasn't found its way in to my material selection process.
Puckdropper
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On 9/23/2009 10:02 PM Puckdropper spake thus:

You mention sanding OSB: have you ever seen it used for flooring? I mean finished flooring; a friend owns a building hereabouts, commercial downstairs, residential upstairs, that has finished OSB floors. They're actually quite attractive and serviceable, even after many years of use.
Other than that, I agree with that poster a couple of replies back: I never use the crap.
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On Sep 23, 9:39pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

We build shipping crates from it all the time. And we also use it for vacuum pressing cauls. And we've even used a little bit as door panels after we ran it through the widebelt. Funky looking stuff once it's sanded smooth and finished with some amber shellac. That was just for kicks though.
JP
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Jay Pique wrote:

When my son was in high school and working at Macy Dept Store, he called me one day and said they were tossing out 5 perfectly nice packing boxes about 3'x3'x12", and thought I should come get them. He said there has got to be some use, perhaps build a cat house for a feral cat community living under my shed. They were made of flake board, the stuff used for roofing today... I built a two story condo, insulated for the cats, and with no finish at all, they have survived 7 years outside though harsh Pittsburgh weather. I thought it would last because I knew a guy that built a cottage on an island in the the river, sided with untreated flake board. It lasted 20 years before a flood swept the damn thing away. The stuff is far more durable than people make out. You can't leave it contact the ground, or it will swell and rot. It can handle a ton of weather as long as it can dry out, but thats true of any wood, other than pressure treated stuff.
Go to my web page, (http://jbstein.com ) and in the photo gallery, under cats, the 4th picture has the cat house I made just by screwing two packing boxes together. Thing is still in perfect shape, still outside, 12 months a year for 7 or so years....
Also, when I built a new bench for my table saw, I used this stuff for the panels, and as temporary doors till I got around to building real doors. Damn, I like the look, and probably won't bother.
http://jbstein.com/Flick/TSBench.jpg
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snip

Looking at the picture of your bench reminds me of a question that's bothered me for years. Why is it called Oriented when it's obvious it isn't?
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there was other ways to orient the chunks. But it would not be a structually sound. Not that OSB is all that strong.
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OK, then How do they orient it?
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LDosser wrote:

Make it in China?
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Ah, so!
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those chunks all lay flat. That is their orintation. (I guess that means they are straight) ;)
The manufacturing process, I don't know. I am certain that there are big presses at work.
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Lee Michaels wrote:

It's more than just "oriented flat". It's designed so that it's stronger in one direction than in another--that direction will usually be marked on the panels.
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J. Clarke wrote:

I can't tell if you guys are all blowing smoke up each other's rears or not. :-)
The "oriented" means, (as with plywood, where they cross hatch the grain pattern of each ply) the chips or shreds or whatever you want to call them in OSB, all have their grain oriented in the same direction on each layer they glue down, or "ply."
And it's not stronger in any direction.
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Dunno' about that....
http://www.cwc.ca/Products/OSB/?Language=EN
"Like waferboard, OSB is made of aspen-poplar strands, southern yellow pine or mixed hardwood species. However, the strands in the outer faces of OSB are normally oriented along the long axis of the panel thereby, like plywood, making it stronger along the long axis as compared to the narrow axis."
... or any number of other sources.
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Neil Brooks wrote:

I'm not going to argue your source, but when I saw it being made, the strands went north/south, east/west, every other layer.
Things may have changed since then, as they often do in anything dealing with evolving technology.
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-MIKE- wrote:

It's an engineered product--the strands have whatever orientation give it the properties that the engineer wants it to have. If they went north/south, east/west every other layer, whichever orientation was on the faces that's the orientation of the stronger axis.
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J. Clarke wrote:

I was thinking that it would make sense to have it stronger in the lengthwise direction, since in its intended application, the width is supported by trusses and studs.
--

-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

If it's OSB intended for roof sheathing then that is in fact how it's made. If it's for wall sheathing then the strength might go the other way. There will be a marking on the faces that shows the direction of the strength axis.
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