Using two guided router bits?

Yeah, another dumb chair rail question.
I thought I had it licked when I found a guided drum sander at Woodworker Supply, but they emailed me today that they had shipped all but one essential item, so I have to return it all. ARGH.
Anyhow, I have a 1" long top bearing straight bit, and a 2" long bottom guided straight bit. Can I run my 2.5" rail through the 1" bit (in a table of course) with a template taped on, and then flip it over and run it through the 2" bit guiding it by the part cut with the 1" bit?
Seems like it ought to work, but sometimes I overlook things... Thanks.
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"Tim" wrote in message

Yes you can ... it works, but, not as well IME, as doing it in one pass.
Which is why I originally designed the taller chair rails around a 2" pattern bit.
IME, the curved work piece has a tendency to tip, particularly if there is wild grain, and you run a much greater risk of gouging with this method, and I found that I needed more than a few "extra's" to insure that I got a usable number of parts, and that can get expensive quickly.
YMMV ...
That said, if you can magic a jig to insure stability, it will certainly work.
I'd sure try it on some cheap stock first, though ... and try to match the grain and hardness of the final stock because I've been fooled when something worked on a softer wood, but not as anticipated on a hardwood like white oak.
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piece of plywood, but even on the bottom the screw holes will be scars.
The "book" calls for a 3.5" top rail and a 2.5" bottom rail. Reducing the top to 2.5" is one thing; reducing them both to 1.8". I donno. The photo you posted looked fine, but still.
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about half an hour. With a little sanding they will be good to use.
I don't know if it was using a bigger saw, a smaller blade (1/4 rather than 1/2), or using ash rather than oak, but it was a completely different experience.
I don't think there is any need to route them at all.
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"Tim" wrote in message

That's good news. The difference in quality between the tools and blades?
I keep my bandsaw tuned up for this type of work and what you describe above is my usual experience, regardless of material.
Glad to hear that you got the problem solved.
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Sure it will work. That's why I sugessted it earlier.

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