Uh-Ohh! Looks like powderpost beetles in the garage walls.


I'm cleaning up things and organizing what to keep and what to donate as I settle my Mom's estate. Tonight I was finally tackling the garage, where she stored her antiques and craft items until she got around to cleaning, restoring, etc. I have found quite a few piles of what sure looks like powder post beetle barf.
The garage is about 20 years old. Stick frame construction, then horizontal nailers were put on to allow installation of board and batten siding. Siding is rough sawn poplar as are the battens, and are well painted. The inside is raw wood. Because of snake intrusion via warped battens, Mom had the inside sealed with some 1-1/2 x 1/2 poplar strips to help keep out those of a scaley persuasion. Spot checking shows that most of the beetle holes are in these interior strips.
I will do some more research tonight, but I figured if anyone out there had a solution it would be on this group. I had planned to fog the garage this weekend, although that probably will not be much help with the PPB problem. Any suggestions? The garage is actually mostly empty (at least compared to my garashop). I will do some heavy inspecting in the daylight of the building and contents. Just hoping for some (relatively) easy solutions to this problem, but think it will actually involve many applications of a nasty insecticide.
Thanks for any input.
Regards, Roy
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On Friday, September 25, 2015 at 7:19:57 PM UTC-5, Roy wrote:

I have used Timbor and it works, though you may have to retreat
http://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/powderpostbeetles.htm
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On Friday, September 25, 2015 at 7:40:17 PM UTC-5, Dr. Deb wrote: I have found quite a few piles of what sure looks like powder post beetle

Yep, Timbor is what you need. Here, it costs $11, 1 lb bag. Mix it well with water.... takes a while to disolve. Mix the amount for the area to b e sprayed, but for $11, might as well mix the whole bag and wet everything in the garage, furniture, etc. Wet all areas of exposed wood, even in the interior of chest/cabinet carcasses, drawers. Might check the exterior wa lls and roof eaves, also, while you're inspecting, if there's exposed wood, there, though you said it's painted. The bugs avoid finished surfaces.
Life Cycle: The beetles (larvae) were in the wood during the winter and sp ring. Late spring/early summer they emerge from the wood, as adults, and f ly off. The adults will return to the same wood, the same area, in the fa ll and lay more eggs, which mature/hatch and start the winter/spring stage of the life cycle, again.
The piles of dust (larvae excrement): The active bugs push the dust out th e holes. For really active cases, you can sometimes hear the bugs inside t he wood. Vibraton of any boards, furniture, etc. can shake out the dust, h ence a false sign that active bugs are in the wood.
Spraying now is a good plan. I usually treat my lumber cache every spring and fall, coinciding with the emergence and return times. The Timbor wil l dry to a crystalline form, in and on the wood being sprayed. If you spr ay a high concentration mix, you'll see the tiny crystals, after the water dries, on surfaces.
Your Mom's furniture may not presently have active bugs, but this is the ti me of year they start returning. If you plan to keep any of your Mom's fur niture, then once you treat and remove it from that location, the returning adults won't know you moved it, so you should be safe as for as that colon y of bugs, that reinfection. *Do you have your own colony PPBs, at your l ocation (LOL)?
For active bugs in upholstered pieces, the furniture can be sprayed, but ta kes a while to kill all the bugs, especially in areas hidden/covered by fab ric, paddings, etc. Once the bugs have been eliminated, vacuum the uphols tery. Otherwise, for immediate and thorough results, upholstered pieces a re fumed.
For other bug concerns, I spray with 38-Plus, an insecticide containing per methrin. .... lots of bugs, ants, etc., here in the subtropics.
Sonny
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Thanks for the info, guys. I am going to spring for the 25 lb container. Besides the garage and the powder post beetles problem, I have two original log cabins my Dad salvaged, moved and restored, that need to be treated at least once a year. I think this Timbor is the same product Dad used to spray on the log cabins to keep carpenter bees away.
Again, thanks for the help. I knew the denizens of rec.woodworking would have the answer.
Regards, Roy
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Just a quick thanks to those who helped me out. I ordered the Timbor and it was delivered only a bit more than 48 hours after placing the order. I was close (as in about 300 miles), but they sure shipped fast.
I bought the 25 pound package and used 5 pounds to do the interior of the garage, home of the powder post beetles. Coverage was a bit over 200 sq ft per gallon. This took the better part of two days, mostly due to moving, sorting and chasing all the stuff from one wall to the next and then back to the original starting point, to get access to the siding. Reminded me I need to purge my own garashop when I get back home. Actual spraying time for the whole job was 60-90 minutes and about 15 minutes mixing time. Use hot water if you have it.
I will use the remaining 20 pounds in the spring on the old logs and the porch structures to ward off the carpenter bees.
Thanks again folks!
Regards, Roy

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