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I have a Sears 10 inch table saw with 1hp motor that was purchased in 1970. The motor is a capacitor start type motor 115 volts 60 cycles 3450 RPM. The motor uses 20 amps. A 15 amp circuit will not run the motor. I assume the starting circuit requires the 20 amps, and the run condition is 15 amps.
The saw came with a two outlet switch that the motor plugged into.
The saw is used for cross cutting of 1 X 2 or 1 X 4 pine or fir. It never runs for more the 10 minutes at a time. (pictures stretchers and frames )
Now my question. The switch itself died to night, I have a project that I on which I am running out of time, I plan to try to find a replacement switch tomorrow.
That failing can I can I use a common 6 outlet power strip as a switch on this motor?
If I can are there any limitations or problems that I should be aware of.
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On 4/11/14, 7:57 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

It will either work or not. It will likely pop the breaker in the power strip or even melt the switch. :-)
If you absolutely need something temporary until you get a replacement safety switch, use a 20 amp light switch.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 4/11/2014 9:06 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Agreed, the 20amp light switch is the way to go.
--
Jeff

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wrote:

+1
Unless his power strip is a really expensive unit meant for much heavier duty than the average bear, it'll either pop a breaker or fail. It could be spectacular, though.
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I predict it will start to melt and then the "magic smoke" will leak out!
--
Jim in NC

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On 4/11/2014 7:57 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Not likely, most are only rated for 15 amp.

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"Keith Nuttle" wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------- You're dealing with a 40+ year old motor that as my mother would say, "doesn't owe me anything."
Jump in your handy-dandy go kart and go to the nearest Grainger and buy a new motor.
You solve your problem SAFELY.
Lew
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On 4/12/2014 12:33 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Even though it is a 40 year old motor it has been maintained. It is not cost effective to replace the over $200 motor because the $30 switch failed. Do I see over 10 trillion dollars in 5 years
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On Fri, 11 Apr 2014 21:33:12 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

Why would you replace a motor just because it's 40 years old. That motor could be better than what you would replace it with today. You're lucky your wife doesn't follow your advice. ;-)
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On Fri, 11 Apr 2014 20:57:56 -0400, Keith Nuttle

Are you sure that the switch is the problem ? Why are you considering a power bar as a temporary switch ? ... too many unknown variables for me to attempt an answer .. sorry. John T.
--- ---
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On 4/12/2014 6:36 PM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.com wrote:

OP: Yes I am sure the problem the switch. The rocker will not move.
I spending the morning looking for a replacement switch or part at Sears, Lowes, Home Depot, and several other stores. Most had no idea of what I was looking for and the problem of the required 20 amps to starting the motor.
When I got home, I decided to take the switch apart and see what was wrong. The rocker has two plungers, that normally run on to brass/copper tracks in the base. One of the tracks shifted and was out of place. This prevented the rocker from rocking. After some work, my big fingers finally got the tracks in the proper place with the plungers in the proper place. It seems to be working, I hope will last until I get this project done.
By the way, Sears has improved their customer service and move their parts store from Raleigh to Durham. Since I live about 20 miles east of Raleigh for all practical purposes, Sears does not have a parts store in the Raleigh area.
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He may need to look up a real electrical supply house instead of the big box or local hardware.
--
Jim in NC


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On 4/12/2014 7:29 PM, Mike Marlow wrote:

I was trying to keep with the original item not to rewire the saw. As purchased 45 years ago the original saw came with a switch box, that had two outlets, one through the switch, and the other hot all of the time. The motor was wired with a standard male plug which plugged into the controlled plug on switch box. This switch box was a standard item with catalog number 45 years ago. The switch box was fasten to the under side of the cast iron top.
As a last resort, I know I can get a 20 amp switch, a plug, a box, a face plate and some wire and make my own switch box.
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---------------------------------------------- "Keith Nuttle" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------- Lew Hodgett wrote:
How do you maintain a motor, wipe the sawdust off?
Although not $200, this solves your problem with today's technology.
http://tinyurl.com/nw7ppyb
Lew
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On 4/11/2014 8:57 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Two things...
1)
An inductive load has a turn on/ turn off voltage spike. That will be harsh on the relatively wimpy switches they put in switched outlets.
2)
If it is a 20A only saw, the plug will have one of the pins horizontal, rather than vertical and won't fit.
So...
I think they have covers for handy boxes that will fit a switch and an outlet. Buy a good light switch and use one of those.
Perhaps:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-20-Amp-Commercial-Grade-Toggle-Switch-White-R52-0CSB1-2WS/202035005

--
pentapus

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On 4/12/2014 8:28 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote: ...

...
And he _still_ doesn't have a switch... :(
I gotta' agree that replacing a motor for a switch failure is over the top.
--


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Lew Hodgett wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------------- "Mike Marlow" wrote:

--------------------------------------------------------------- After maintaining an operarating thermal environment within specs, not much more is needed. ------------------------------------------------------- Lew Hodgett wrote:

---------------------------------------------------------- "Mike Marlow" wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------------- "Today's technology." You know the kind that has all the control circuitry built into the motor.
Lew
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On 4/12/2014 6:42 AM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

...
What was the point of the unswitched outlet, anyway, on a TS?
I'd replace it w/ something like the following--I may have one or two unused (I swapped everything over to 240 V magnetic starters) that I'd let go for half that or so if interested...
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On 4/12/2014 9:28 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

"How do you maintain a motor, wipe the sawdust off?" ______________________________________________________
The saw was purchased about 1970. I inherited the saw about 1987. My father-in-law had been sick for a long time so the saw got used very little.
At some time in the late 90's the motor died. I took it down to the local small motor repair shop, for a diagnosis of whether I needed a new motor. He looked at it ask a couple of question, and reached for a screw drive. He proceeded to disassemble the motor and found a splinter of wood in a contact in the motor start circuit. He took out the armature and cleaned the old saw dust out of the motor. With each step he showed me exactly what he was doing. He recommended doing that every 3 to 5 years depending on the usage, and to vacuum the vents on the motor with every use.
I have followed his recommendation ever since and the motor is still in good conditions.
As I said in the previous post, after not finding what I wanted for a replacement, I took the switch apart and rebuilt it. I will order a new switch on line. That is what I did for my ShopVac after that switch failed.
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On 4/13/2014 8:48 AM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

So much to be said for almost anything made 40 years ago in the US. You could take them apart and fix them. The trend is toward lowest cost and minimum amount of materials. Not so fixable. I tried to fix a motor start on a Sears washing machine not long ago. Not only was that not possible but the part was over $60 (not retail), on a used washer worth $80 used, not a good plan.

Seems like the right plan. I thought the switch was no longer available.
Sears parts departments used to be quite good, and relatively cheap. I believe much of that has gone by the wayside.

--
pentapus

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