Screwdrivers, electric or hand?

Hi
I was lately doing something with large items, and I had a friend to help me - and he asked why I dont use a electric screwdriver - when I work I'd like to have a feeling with the items I make....
so I use and ordinary screwdriver and a special one, with the handle in 90 degrees and when turned, it can go back without turning the screw ( click -click - click)
What do people prefer?
Sonnich
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On Fri, 1 Jun 2012 14:56:18 -0700 (PDT), Sonnich Jensen

I have generic screwdrivers, a Yankee (push) screwdriver, three different power drill/drivers. The tool depends on the job. For assembling ceiling fans, I prefer a specific drill/driver because the torque can be adjusted down appropriately for mounting the blades to their arms (equal torque is critical in having a fan that doesn't wobble).
Sometimes the location of a screw determines the tool - perhaps a deep, narrow space that requires a long, thin shaft or perhaps close quarters that require a stubby screwdriver or [your circumstances here]
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i don't think it matters what others prefer, it's what you prefer. me, I prefer my 12v bosch for little stuff and my 18v impact driver for bigger stuff. but that said, I still use the old manual on occasion, too
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Both.
I have tried the straight electric screwdriver types and people are asking for tendonitis using those things. You can't torque your wrist tendons without movement or you damage tendons using them without oxygen to them by motion. Too hard on you.
Manual torque screwdrivers or right angle drill type handle, for me. I have an impact unit and I am not impressed, except for on decking boards. Way too noisy... you will need hearing protection inside tight spaces and too many heads and bits stripped.
----------- "Sonnich Jensen" wrote in message
Hi
I was lately doing something with large items, and I had a friend to help me - and he asked why I dont use a electric screwdriver - when I work I'd like to have a feeling with the items I make....
so I use and ordinary screwdriver and a special one, with the handle in 90 degrees and when turned, it can go back without turning the screw ( click -click - click)
What do people prefer?
Sonnich
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Sonnich Jensen wrote:

Do they even MAKE manual screwdrivers any more?
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You're kidding............. right?
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HeyBub wrote:

sure....but they come with a mexican<g>
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On 6/1/2012 4:56 PM, Sonnich Jensen wrote:

Put in enough screws and you will end up with a powered driver. Put in enough Philips head screws and you will switch to square drive. Put in enough Square drive and you will switch to Torx/star drive.
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On Fri, 1 Jun 2012 14:56:18 -0700 (PDT), Sonnich Jensen

They sound like tools my grandfather used to use.
If it is more than one or two screws, I reach for the electric. If it is even one screw and more than an inch long, I reach for the electric.
For driving screws, small and light is more important than the 48 volt sodium hydrogenated lithium oxide led batteries that last 200 hours but weigh 20 pounds. A simple 9.6V or 12.2V work well for 99.5% of what we do.
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For long screws and driving them in to wood, powered. For shorter screws and machine threads, often manual. It depends on the application. The power screwdriver is fast and strong, while the manual screwdriver is quick and easy to control.
I've found the powered "stick" drivers to be occasionally useful, but usually bulky and short on battery.
You can combine the two if you'd like to get the best of both worlds. Drive the screw most the way with the powered driver, then finish up with the manual.
If you're removing screws that have been painted or otherwise covered, a powered impact driver can be a great help. It will allow you to keep the bit solidly pushed in to the screw head while the driver turns the screw out.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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Puckdropper wrote:

After reading your post, I went off to learn something about impact drivers. The thought that the thread at the following link did a good job of comparing/contrasting drills, hammer drill and impact drills. Here it is for anyone who may be interested:
http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/articles/drills-vs-hammer-drills-vs-impact-drivers /
Bill
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Not a bad article.
LJ, who has a Bosch 14.4v Impactor kit for sale at $99 + s/h.
-- Shake off all the fears of servile prejudices, under which weak minds are servilely crouched. Fix reason firmly in her seat, and call on her tribunal for every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason than that of blindfolded fear. -- Thomas Jefferson
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Sonnich Jensen wrote:

1. A few screws up to #8 x 2" - hand, ratchet screw driver with appropriate bit
2. A few bigger screws - brace with appropriate bit
3. A lot of screws - drill with appropriate bit
--

dadiOH
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Sonnich Jensen wrote:

Like others it depends on the project at hand, I use an impact for driving tek screws into sheet metal, battery screw gun for mounting cover plates and other repetitive tasks where clutch control is important. Hand screwdrivers for delicate work or mounting items on soft material like ceiling tile.
I see a disturbing trend on the job site where younger workers grab the impact driver for everything including retaining screws in thin aluminum housings and ceiling tile support brackets that can be bent easily.
Proper tool for the job is my rule
--
PV

"If Inflammable means more flammable, then what does incompetent mean?'



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It seems I reach for my cordless electric Black & Decker screwdriver more all the time. I originally only used it if I had LOTS of screws to drive, but now, I often use it even for only one screw. It just saves time. However, if a screw is tight, or I'm worried about marring my work, especially if I'm using straight slotted screws for a traditional look, I'll often finish up with a manual screwdriver. If I have a small, picky, job to do, I like tiny, old, wooden handled screwdrivers... If you have a lot of time, you can search this group for "the perfect screwdriver rack."
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I thought of this thread today... As I went back into the garage to get a manual screwdriver. Normally, I'd just use whatever tool I had to check if a screw was tight, but there was one catch: The screwhead was under water.
So for underwater screws, I prefer a manual screwdriver. You don't even have to wipe it off if it's clean water. ;-)
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On Jun 6, 10:49pm, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

After reading all this I realise that I am old fashioned.... and that I need to invent at water proof screwdriver :)
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On Wed, 13 Jun 2012 22:10:44 -0700 (PDT), Sonnich Jensen

I have a set of stainless screwdrivers. Perhaps that's the sort you're looking for. ;-)
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