Screw question

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"B A R R Y" wrote:

I'm with you.
Unless it is decorative, where brass/bronxe are required, I use coarse thread, self tapping, S/S for all projects.
Lew
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That deserves a cheer! ;)
R
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Garage_Woodworks wrote:

Depends on the "look" you want. All the platings other than galvanizing are for appearance mostly.
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Garage_Woodworks
There was a very good article in either Popular Woodworking or Fine Woodworking last month on just this topic. I am not near my magazines right now so I can't say which. Maybe another reader can.
Joe.... Website: www.srww.com Blog: www.srww.com/blog

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wrote:

When I have a need for metal screws I use plated deck screws for indoors and outdoors works. The source or procurement for me is at Home Hardware where I buy them by the pound. I also use SS screws for all boat work.
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Garage_Woodworks

There is an article by Glen Huey in the Summer 2008 issue of Woodworking Magazine...
John
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Unless you have a very specific application, the common unplanted dry lube will work fine. These are probably 10 times more resistant to snapping than dry wall screws. I have used dry lubed screws out doors with only a hint of discoloration after 15 years. This is not to say that you should use them out doors but about 15 years ago I used them along the rail road ties landscaping to string Christmas lights. They are still there and look fine.
Other choices work better for marine applications and or when aesthetics come into play. Typically the dry lubed if not visible will be plenty strong. I use at least a #8 for typical furniture and #10 for HD furniture applications that may carry some excess weight like table leg bracing.
Typically flat head works well with counter sunk holes, if exposed and on top of the flat surface a pan head works out well.
For about 25 years I have been using these dry lubed screws on all applications for indoor use regardless of wood. I built an oak desk about 22 years ago and have relocated it 3 times. To get through the doors it has to be partially disassembled, no corrosion has ever been evident when combining steel screws and oak. That said however if you use "SOAP" as a lubricant you will eventually have a reaction as soap contains water. Use a wax to lube your screws and you should have no problems.
And needless to say, go with the square drive and or combo head and buy an assortment of square drive bits. I prefer 2" and 6" lengths. I have had better luck with the 2 piece bits rather than the solid one piece bits. IIRC the 2 piece design helps absorb some of the shock when using a power driver and or impact. I have had several 1 piece designs break and typically the 2 piece designs simply wear out.
Additionally I highly recommend getting one of the larger combo packages that McFeeleys offers as once you switch to these screws you never want to use a screw from the borg again. I probably keep 3 or 4 thousand on hand at any given time in sizes from 3/8" through 3" in #4, #6, #8, and #10. I really do not want to use any other kind of screw if I can help it. The assortments offer a pretty good value and you get a pretty good sampling of common sizes. I store these screws in 9 steel parts bin drawers. Screws in larger quantities become heavy of a container and these steel drawers allow dividers to separate different length screws.
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<SNIP of very helpful info>

Thank you! I ordered an assortment (#8 black oxide) last night. I get 100 each of 3/4" through 2-1/2".
They state on their web page that the coated screws have the same strength as the uncoated. I think I am use to the black oxide from using dry wall screws for so long so I went with those.
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Yeah, strength changes when you change types of material to make the screw. The black oxide will be more consistent in color, the dry lube can vary from gun metal grey to slightly brown. You be fine with those.
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Nonsense.
This is a perfectly good place to ask a question so long as it is woodworking-related...
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