Rewire Hitachi M12V for 240 volts

Hi. I'm looking at buying a Hitachi M12V from the States for use in Australia (a 240 Volt country).
They are about half the price in the US but, unless I'm mistaken, they run on 110 volts.
Can anybody advise if it is possible to convert it to run on 240 volts?
Thanks.
Stephen.
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Transformer. Even adapts the plug.

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Thanks for the response.
I thought about a transformer but big, maybe inefficient, costly?
Was hoping the factory had a convenient switch under the covers someplace. I see these on other appliances (mainly switch mode power supplies).
Stephen.
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Transformers are generally efficient. One that can handle the M12V will be big and rather expensive. Devices with regulated power supplies can easily switch from 120V to 240V. Many can automatically detect the voltage and adjust accordingly. Devices with induction motors can frequently be rewired to work on the different voltage. But devices with universal motors, like the M12V can rarely make the switch. You may want to look into getting a 240V router.

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Stephen,
I agree with Al. After you pay shipping (possibly customs duty) and shell out for a transformer you have lost any savings. Take it from me (I lived in the States for a number of years and returned to Oz with 110v products) it simply is not worth it in the long run. Routing whilst attached to a transformer soon becomes a PITA.
The transformers pop fuses regularly when starting tools (even soft start) and the decent transformers cost as much as a router. Why not buy the Triton instead?
--
Greg


"AL" < snipped-for-privacy@mail.plz> wrote in message news:6zHNc.44136$eM2.4066@attbi_s51...
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Thanks for the advice so far.
Since the internet took over the world I've been awoken to (and aghast at) the effects of zone marketing.
Some regions (Europe, Australia etc) are simply being ripped off for a broad range of products, so where possible I try to get around this (buying online).
Of course this is not always possible or practical - especially when you plug it into the wall.
As for the Triton - I supose I am leaning toward the Hitachi since it has a loyal following over a long period of time - tried and trusted.
But since I have to buy locally, I may re-assess the situation before shelling out 500 AUD for something that costs 220 AUD elsewhere.
Stephen.
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Stephen wrote:

It's not always "zone marketing". Sometimes it's protective tarrifs intended to help get a domestic industry started. If the Triton is _much_ cheaper in AU than the competing brands that may be what's going on.
In some cases this is taken to a ridiculous extreme--I remember a marketing guy for a Fortune 50 aerospace company smuggling a Spalding basketball into Brazil for a prospective customer. They got the contract, although I hope that price and technical merit had more to do with it than willingness to smuggle a basketball . . .

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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<political opinion alert!!> This is possible although the government in oz (past and present) couldn't seem to care less about the local manufacturing industries. I think the current opinion is if you can't compete with a $40 a month worker in asia then get out.
As for power tools I can't remember there ever being a powertool industry here except maybe for a black and decker factory once - correct me if I'm wrong though. I don't know much about the triton router - I think its cheaper than the M12V, not sure where its made. Opinions anybody?
Stephen.
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OK, I know very little about electricity in general and zippo about electricity systems outside the US, but......(now doesn't that just scare ya), if I am not completely mistaken, in the US 240 volt is supplied to the house via two "hots". In the breaker box this is broken into two 120 lines and supplied through the house except where we want 240 - then it is run with both "hots". How is the system set up in other countries where 240 is the norm? Do they just run both hots to all outlets? or is 240 supplied to the house over a single "hot"? (I told ya I was clueless) If 240 is supplied over a single "hot" then I would assume that even our (US) 240 equipment doesn't work there (Yeah, I am ignoring the 50Hz vs. 60 Hz issue entirely). If the 240 is distributed over 2 hots, then what is to stop you from getting a US sub-panel and breakers and wiring up some 120 outlets? Yeah, I know it can't be that simple, I just would like to know why.
Thanks.
Dave Hall
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snipped-for-privacy@nhsd.k2.pa.us (David Hall) writes:
[...]

Over 3 "hots". In Europe we have a three-phase power supply, with 230V betwen any of the "hot" wires (L1, L2, L3) and the center wire (N), and 400V between any two "hot" wires. This way you can use the only reasonable kind of electrical motor: The three-phase asynchronous motor, wich does not have any brushes or other failure-prone fiddly bits, and power does not require countless amps.
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Ah, sure.
Less amps at 230 or 400, than 115, of course. Same energy, with a bit less line loss. Save on site copper, too.
3-phase motors are cheaper to manufacture, that's for sure. Only industrial users have 3-phase here. Imagine whatever reason led to our standard is not the reason why we stick to it. Suspect that it now has more to do with producer liability and that 400 available volts.
Now what I liked was the 400 Hz stuff on the aircraft. Tiny motors produced the most amazing results.
(David Hall) writes:

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