Recommendations For Glue Line Ripping on TS?

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I'm doing a lot of ripping of maple flooring scraps on my TS using a combination blade. The scraps are edge joined to make larger panels, but I currently need to run the ripped pieces through the planer to get the ripped edges clean enough for gluing. I'm ready to spring for a good ripping blade, but there are so many choices. Freud alone must have 6 or 8 blades they recommend for glue line ripping.
I searched the web and Fine Woodworking for rip saw blade reviews, but I didn't find anything. If you have nay personal recommendations for or against a particular blade, I'd love to hear them.
Thanks, Ed
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Blade's as good as your saw in a lot of ways.
More teeth make better cuts if you have a good fence and a good arbor - and lots of power. Geometry of the much-revered Woodworker II or the less-touted Freud and Oldham (and others I haven't tried) is normally about 50 teeth. Should do 3/4 maple on a 1.5 HP saw, all things being equal. I'm such a dinosaur I automatically join a fresh edge, though the days of my 30-tooth all steel rip blade are long past. Still have one of the old steel hollow-ground blades, and it's top-notch, but getting tough to find sharpening service.

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George wrote:

Eh? More teeth would make it a good cross cut (miter/mitre David) blade. From all I've come to know and respect a good glue line rip blade is way down on number of teeth embedded in the wood at one time.
More teeth = slow feed rate while ripping and burning.
You are right about more teeth requiring more power.
Of course I could be wrong but given the myths stated here (PVC dust collection starts fires/band saw wheels and coplanar/tipping your rip fence out away from the back edge of the blade) lately I'm thinking maybe we should get back to quoting the text and not passing along links to The Lumber Car.
UA100
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Here I thought the surface was all about finer scratches.
You certainly have a unique view.

and
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That's not a unique view, it is an accurate one and I would wager one that *most* have.

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both the Forrest WWII and the Freud double melamine blades do super smooth cuts. those are the only two I can vouch for. I'm willing to bet there are a whole lot more blades out there up to the task. Since those 2 blades work so well for me, I'm not gonna try any others, at this point.
dave
Ed Bailen wrote:

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For lots of ripping of hardwoods, I prefer a Freud Industrial or Systematic rip blade over my WWII.
The WWII rips fine, with a very occasional burn, usually due to me swapping hands or stopping for some other reason. I find the dedicated rip blades faster and easier to use if I've got a lot to do.
Just a couple to do? I leave the WWII on the saw.
Barry
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I've had great luck with CMT sawblades. They have a 10" 60 tooth "cabinetmakers" blade that I get great performance from for general use and has been to the sharpening shop twice and comes back for more. I have no reservation recommending it for glue joints. I do also have a Woodworker II but it's so expensive I tend to save it for only the most critical cuts, hands down the best blade I've got in the 10" collection. Here is also a review from shopnotes I found.
http://www.woodnet.net/toolreviews/blad_rev.html
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Eric, I must be a lot more lazy than you because I had every intention of putting in the WWII for the "special" cuts. No way can I do that; it stays in the TS unless I cut melamine and then I put in the Freud double sided melamine blade to avoid ALL chip out. I don't have the patience to keep changing blades. Besides, NOT using the WWII is kinda like putting plastic wrap on your sofa. :)
dave
Eric Johnson wrote:

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No doubt, I love it. Lock and key for 2 reasons. I have several thousand Bd ft of reclaimed walnut in the storage shed that came from an old barn that most of my projects have been made from lately. I do my best with the metal detector but... I have one of the more well equiped shops around and have frequent "can I quick do this" types stopping in. You know the folks I mean, the ones when the works done and equipment is shut down you hand 'em a bud light and save the Moosehead for yourself . EJ

and
II
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CMT general blade very good. Tenryu general purpose outstanding. These blades have a lot of teeth for ripping; I like a dedicated rip blade with more like 20 teeth; cheaper to sharpen as well as low feed pressure with a 15 to 20 degree hook. Freud "glue line rip" good.Howe
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That's an interesting way to put it, and I agree. I bought GOOD tools to _use_. <G>
Barry
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Ed,
We sell the Freud line of blades, so you can take this for what it is worth.
The Freud LM74 Anti-Vibe Glue Line rip blade is as fine a rip blade as you are likely to find. Freud's anti-vibe technology and solid understanding of the cutting geometry required to obtain perfect cuts has made this my first choice. Rip blades have deep gullets and fewer teeth than cross cut blades so that the long stringy chips created don't end up getting cut and recut, or plugging in shallower gullets.
I haven't tried it myself, but Freud's demonstration of this blade involved ripping 1/8" thick strips off the edge of an oak board, then reassembling them. I was difficult to see where one piece started and the next one ended.
Feel free to talk to my Technical Director, Darin Lawrence at 1-800-443-7937 for additioal information.
Jim Ray, President McFeely's Square Drive Screws www.mcfeelys.com
-- email SPAM countermeasures require removal of allnails to reply

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Hi, I have the LM74R and it gives me a better edge when ripping than my WWll. Cheers, JG
Jim Ray wrote:

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Ed Bailen asks:

I've got a Freud 30 tooth finish rip blade that does a marvelous job. IIRC< DeWalt has recently come out with a 40 tooth rip blade, but I've not used it. Any good 24 or 30 tooth 10" rip blade should work just fine.
Charlie Self "To create man was a quaint and original idea, but to add the sheep was tautology." Mark Twain's Notebook
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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<snip>
With respect to you... How do you run rippings through your PLANER?
Tales of a Boatbuilder Apprentice http://pages.sbcglobal.net/djf3rd /
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On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 16:39:56 -0800, Dave Fleming <> scribbled:

BTDT. Clamp a bunch of them together face to face. Make sure the clamps are shorter than the planer is wide, and that there's no chance of the blades hitting the clamps
Luigi Note the new email address. Please adjust your krillfiles (tmAD) accordingly Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address
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Actually, Luigi, since the ripped pieces are about 1x2, I just gang a bunch of them face to face as you described and run them through without clamps.
For planks with a higher aspect ratio, I made a sled out of MDF with a vertical riser dadoed in at a precise 90-degree angle. I clamp the thinner planks to the riser to clean up the riped face.
Ed
wrote:

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Read up on glue line ripping by doing a Google search. It's worth the time.
I use a Leuco Glue Line Blade (been using the same blade for ten years and never needed to do more than a tune up with a diamond hone) and, when doing repetitive cuts, I move the stock feeder from it's normal position on the shaper to the tablesaw, so as to eliminate the feed rate/direction/holddown variable.
It's important to set the blade up dead parallel to the fence and it's more important that the fence not move or flex under feed pressure.
Experiment with blade heights before doing your production run. The blade height/angle of attack has a lot to do with the result.
Once you are set up it is easy to get nearly jointer quality rips out of the tablesaur, providing that you ignore the people who say that the fence should be kicked out 1/64" (a huge amount) from front to back.
The fence shoulf be as parallel to the cutting plane of the blade as is humanly possible and your stock prep should have already taken care of bows and bellies.
Hoadley is good on the understanding of joint edge quality in relation to gluing. I don't have his current version but the old one is very informative on this.
Good Luck. Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker (ret) Real Email is: tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet Website: http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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<severe snip>

<'nuther severe snip>
Good advice ***if** using a powered feeder but, for hand feeding I have been sucessful with using the thickness of a Bicycle playing card approx. .010 to .011 of an inch, as a guage for the distance away from the blade at rear of fence. And no matter what ,if you even think there might be some deflection from either way....Backup that rear clamp as best you can!!!!!!! Best blade you can buy is none too good. Lietz, Leuco, Guido, are my favourites. Had an old North American Carbide that was ACES but somehow it took a walk one fine day and hasn't come back, sigh. Tales of a Boatbuilder Apprentice http://pages.sbcglobal.net/djf3rd /
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