Radial arm saw versus 12" compund sliding miter saw question.

Page 1 of 6  
I am trying to decide which one to buy. If I get a RAS I will not be doing any ripping with it. If I get a scms would I not have the best of both worlds and would it be safer to use and require less shop space and allow me to sell my chop saw? I can get a ras cheap. Thanks for your opinions.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pete wrote:

All depends on what you intend/want to do and what else you have.
IMO different tools, different uses.
For one, a small, inexpensive RAS will be unlikely to have the accuracy w/o fiddling w/ it the miter saw (again unless you're going HF or its ilk).
But, still, "all depends"...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I started off with a RAS and built half the furniture in my house.
4 years later I bought a Craftsman contractors saw and IMEDIATELY quit using the RAS.
5 years later I bought a 12" CMS to suppliment the TS
9 years later I upgraded my contractors to a cabinet saw.
Almost immediately I quit using my CMS.
I do all my of cutting on the 52" capacity cabinet saw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

I have a 10" Delta CMS that I used quite a bit but never really liked doing so. I bought a used 10" Craftsman RAS this past year which I've set up as a crosscut-only machine. Haven't used the CMS since; it's all table saw and RAS. :-)
--
"Our beer goes through thousands of quality Czechs every day."
(From a Shiner Bock billboard I saw in Austin some years ago)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Turner wrote:

Ditto. Unless I have to crosscut something too wide - like a cabinet panel - in which case I use the table saw with a *large* crosscut sled.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pete wrote:

Assuming you don't want to rip on it, then the *only* thing you can do on a RAS that you can't do on a SCMS is a stacked dado. Even so, you can replicate the results by taking multiple passes on the SCMS.
I had option of free Dewalt RAS or purchasing a Dewalt 12" SCMS. I bought the slider.
~Mark.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Woody wrote:

...and run a molding head, a spindle sander, do horizontal boring, run a rotary surface planer, and a few other things.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No true. My RAS has a molding head, a planer attachment and a chuck for router bits. It does a much poorer job at any of those tasks than a dedicated tool but it is possible. Being able to rotate the head vertically opens up possibilities that a SCMS cannot touch.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You can probably pick up a 30YO RAS for almost nothing. That said, I have both (and a table saw). The RAS hasn't been used in some time though.

How do you dado on an SCMS, even with multiple passes?

I may replace my slider, though it would be another 10" so it uses the same blades as my table saw. 12" blades are expen$ive, and I don't cut anything thick enough to need it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The blade dia. is the only thing that is the same between a 10" CMS a 10" table saw and even a 10" RAS. The same would also apply to other diameters. The hook angle of the blades are different for each saw. This is because of the way the blade moves in relation to the work or vice versa. Many people use the blades on the wrong saw and could injure their tools, their work or even themselves. Always use the blade designed for that specific saw on that saw only.
Gordon Shumway
Our Constitution needs to be used less as a shield for the guilty and more as a sword for the victim.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 03 Dec 2009 19:24:35 -0600, Gordon Shumway

How is the blade going to "injure the tools"? I've looked at a lot of blades and few say anything about the saw they're designed for. THe ones that do tend to be cheaper blades for CMS saws.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Actually the better quality blades, Forrest for instance, do in fact suggest speciffic blades for specific saws.
WW 1 Best for RAS
WW 2 Best for TS
And then there is the Chop Master for the chop and miter saws.
Additionally because the RAS is typically going to be doing more cross cutting than ripping the WW1 has more teeth. When there are more teeth during cross cutting you get a smoother cut. The WW2 for the TS has fewer teeth and as you would suspect the TS is better suited for ripping.
With both those comments in mind I have 2, 40 tooth WW 2 blades for my TS. I would challange most any blade including the WW1 to produce a better cross cut. Then why have more teeth on a more cross cut specific blade? With more teeth you get a faster cut when cross cutting with the same smooth result. With fewer teeth you simply cut slower to replicate a blade with more teeth. Additionally with more teeth doing the " harder on the teeth" cross cutting they stay sharper longer than a blade with fewer teeth.
Last, the blades made for specific saws also have tooth bevel angles that are better suited to cutting wood on that particular saw. Typically with a TS the higher the blade is above the cut the better the cut. But for that you typically have the blade teeth completely clear the top of the work being cut. For a RAS you typically don't want the blade to penetrate the table surface much more than the bottom of the cut. Here a different tooth hook angle is more beneficial and reduces the tendency of the blade to grab the work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

We drove up to Birmingham yesterday so I stopped by Woodcraft. All of their Forrest blades had the good for: with pictures of a RAS, Cabinet saw, SCMS, and all but one had a picture of a contractor's saw. No idea why a contractor's saw is any different than a cabinet saw, but...

Oh, good grief. Do you always keep your rip blade on your table saw?
<snipped more of the moronic argument>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

May I suggest you go directly to the Forrest site?
http://www.forrestblades.com/http://www.forrestblades.com/online_catalog.htm
You may have been looking at thin kerf blades. Typically a contractors will cut faster with a thin kerf blade.

I do not use a rip blade, at all. I have always for the last 20 years used a general purpose/combination blade for ALL cuts. For the last 10 years I have only used a Forrest WW2 regular kerf blade on my saw. I have two. I switch them out when I send the dull one out for resharpening.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They don't want the blade to cut faster? The blade in question did *not* have the contractor's saw pictured but did have a cabinet saw.

I use a combination blade for ripping but usually a blade with a lot more teeth for crosscuts. My point was that of course different blades are used for different purposes, but that has nothing to do with the discussion at hand. I'm not even arguing that a blade designed for a RAS won't cut as well on a table saw (though I'm not completely buying the difference between a RAS and SCMS). The point that I'm arguing (against) is that somehow a blade designed for a table saw will somehow "injure" a RAS. *THAT* is what I'm calling bullshit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
I use a combination blade for ripping but usually a blade with a lot more teeth for crosscuts. My point was that of course different blades are used for different purposes, but that has nothing to do with the discussion at hand. I'm not even arguing that a blade designed for a RAS won't cut as well on a table saw (though I'm not completely buying the difference between a RAS and SCMS). The point that I'm arguing (against) is that somehow a blade designed for a table saw will somehow "injure" a RAS. *THAT* is what I'm calling bullshit.
Check my reply to JClark below. You have to admit that that senerio could/eventually will cause harm to the saw. I too don't believe that a particular blade will absolutely do harm but it can increase the chance of doing harm.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Leon" wrote

Speaking of harm to a radial arm saw, I had a friend who kept a big RAS in my garage for awhile. He needed to cut up some aluminum that he bought at a salvage yard. Most of it was soft and the saw cut it easily. Then he ran across an oddball peice that was extra hard.
He tried to pull it through the piece and it went up and over it. It bent the arm up. After that, it cut a nice little curve upwards. If I had to do a dado, it would curve up about 3/16' - 1/4' over nine inches. I had to cut the dado from both sides and chisel out the high spot in the middle. That is when I went to a router for my dadoes.
It is an extreme example, I know. But these saws can get damaged if you put enough stress on it. That priciple applies to anything mechanical or biological. The other lesson learned here, you can never tell exactly what it is that you get at the salvage yard. That is the fun part for me. But I would never cut aluminum on a RAS.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I bet if you ran over a RAS with a tank it would bend the arm too. That's a bit different than the "wrong" blade "injuring the saw" which is still bullshit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I bet if you ran over a RAS with a tank it would bend the arm too. That's a bit different than the "wrong" blade "injuring the saw" which is still bullshit.
Well Keith it is obvious that you have made up your mind. Some things are simply hard to comprehend.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, I've made my mind up to the obvious.
I will agree that some blades are better in (designed for) some tools, producing superior results. Perhaps even that some designs may reduce kick-back or climbing (perhaps reducing the possibility injury to the operator). However, "injury" to the tool is just silly.
Do note that there are *MANY* blades that are specified to be used in all like tools, so the original argument is a dumb one. It certainly is possible to use the same blade on a RAS, table saw, and SCMS. Yes, you folks have done a good job of convincing me that you're talking bullshit.
BTW, please fix your newsreader's quoting.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.