Question about shellac solvent

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Charlie Self wrote: ...

It <is> pretty, I'll agree. I spent 10 years or so in the Lynchburg area, then 25 in east TN.
I missed the flat country the whole time, however. I like seeing the far horizon, but it (like anything else) isn't everybody's cup o' tea.
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Duane Bozarth notes:

True.
Lynchburg, AKA Falwellville, is about 30 miles east of here.
My wife likes it. I prefer Roanoke, 30 miles west.
Charlie Self "It is when power is wedded to chronic fear that it becomes formidable." Eric Hoffer
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Charlie Self wrote:

Hard to believe today, but I'd never heard of the village painter's son before I got there. Lynchburg certainly was a culture shock to a KS farm boy right out of school to get to the "proper" behavior of The Old Dominion... :)

Roanoke was far bigger than Lynchburg back then ('68) although that was certainly far larger than where I came from, of course...never really spent any time in Roanoke. Drove by to get to Blacksburg or to/from KS when visiting is about all...
By the time we left, the influx of new hires by B&W and GE had diluted the originals to the point it was no longer the totally closed society it was when we arrived...
Overall, did enjoy our time there although I feel much more at home back here now.
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Charlie Self wrote:

Not around here, no, but you do see a little of that in Virginia. I ran down into the far southeastern corner once, near the Great Dismal Swamp. They had fields that gave me some inkling what it must be like out west. Trees on the far side far enough away that you could see the curvature of the earth in between.
I think I run through a fair amount of that in the Carolinas too, but they have the good sense to hide it all with trees, so it doesn't unsettle the hillbilly stomach so badly.

Me too. Think about where I run. It's good running, but I'd go nuts if I had to live there, I think. Some places you can see where the road is going 15-20 miles ahead of you, with a big straight slash right down the middle of the gently rolling Jummy forests. It just doesn't feel right without those big green humps surrounding you
The only time I can tolerate flat is when there's an ocean at the far side of it. I try not to look back the other way. :)
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"Norman D. Crow" wrote: ...

Well, not necessarily... :)
I got an engineering degree when got out of high school (for complex reasons relating to the state of farming in general and the particular state of the family farm at the time) and spent 10 years in Lynchburg, VA, and then another 25 or so in the Oak Ridge, TN, area so I know the "hill country" there pretty well... :)
In TN, I serviced our line of online coal ash analyzers at mines and prep plants all over coal country in TN, VA, WVA, and KY. I know most of eastern KY and SW VA pretty darn well. We had fewer in WVA and most TN mines were surface so I had less direct interaction there. I got to know and like a tremendous number of miners over the years. It's a great portion of the country. I always told others that sitting around w/ the miners after shift was essentially the same as sitting around at the Co-op elevator scales w/ the grain farmers or the sale barn w/ the cattlemen--just a slightly different set of topics for each.... :)
My biggest complaint was that servicing of the analyzers was always left for night shift when running gob and it never failed but to be a cold rain or snow at 2 AM on the outside belt in KY in Feb... :( :)
There really is very little difference in the <farmers> themselves between the regions, it's all in the crops and ground they're farming. Out here where it only rains 18" or so a year, it is simply not possible to grow most things that are grown back there and the yields of what does grow are not sufficient on small acreages to make it. There are still a number of smaller operations in central and eastern KS, OK, NE, AR, etc., that look much more like what you're familiar with and where, unfortunately, the economics are such that it does require a second (or third) job. Here on the high plains, it has mostly been a case of the second and third generations mergeing (sp?) two or more operations together as the parents retire. In most cases in at least one of those families all children will have left so there is no one else to take over. It wasn't until Dad died that I decided to come back and that was not planned ahead--I discovered when he passed very unexpectedly that I had such emotional ties to the place I could not think of letting it pass out of the family. Since my kids were all raised in VA and TN, they have rememberances of their grandparents, but no real attachment--I don't expect either of the boys will have the same realization when I'm gone so at that point it probably will also be merged in w/ one or more of the neighboring places and someone will probably put a town-farm on the home place itself... :( I've a few more decent years, but certainly in 10-15 I'll be thinking it's time to try to arrange for something not <quite> so demanding... :) Undoubtedly far more than you wanted to know... :)
Enjoyed the interaction, guys, thanks...
-dpb
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"Norman D. Crow" wrote: ...

Cousin's place was outside Bergen--enjoyed getting to know several of the locals there over a number of summers...

One major difference here was that it was settled so late and the open country encouraged large-scale farming from the beginning. Our town wasn't founded until 1888 when the railroad ended here before being allowed to cross into the OK Territory. Grandad came out from central KS in 1914 and started w/ mules, but got first tractors in the 20s. Unfortunately I do not know what the very first was, but an early Twin City was the first "large" one--it was about 30 hp I think. By the 30s they used Cat Twenty-Two's for the flotation, one of which is still operational (although I don't have it, sadly). I first drove the Farmall M, then we got a 400 and 560. Our first big tractor was a Case 930 wheatland model. Grandpa bought a AC WD45 when he got older to have something he could handle a little easier...it had the snap-coupler system and we had so many implements for it that Dad upgraded it to a D17 (about 50 hp, I think) when I was in high school. I did a <ton> of row crop on it. When we went to six-row planters we got the first JD 4020. Dad then gradually stepped up over the years as it became necessary to add acreage and as it became nearly impossible to get good reliable help. He progressed through JD 4440, 4640, 4840s. I still have the ('79) 4440 (w/ <4000 original hours) for the scoop and blade, mowing around the place, etc.
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On Sun, 19 Dec 2004 10:02:46 -0500, "Norman D. Crow"

Flatland farmers understand "A developer wants to buy your land" quite well.
Barry
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Ba r r y wrote:

Certainly and issue around the larger cities/towns, not nearly as much so in more rural areas...see my other post on demographics...our little town is no farther to the south or east towards us now than it was when I was in high school in the 60s. It has moved north by about 1 mile in that time. The big expansion is the flood of trailers before there was any county-wide zoning at all... :(
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Duane Bozarth responds:

Consider yourself exceptionally fortunate. In the past 28 years, Bedford County has almost doubled in population, and is one of Virginia's fastest growing areas west of Charlottesville. I'm not at all sure there are many areas east of C'ville that are gobbling farm space as rapidly.
Charlie Self "It is when power is wedded to chronic fear that it becomes formidable." Eric Hoffer
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Charlie Self wrote:

That's too bad...I haven't been back to Lynchburg for almost 15 years now...we lived in southwest end of Anderson County close to what was (then) the new golf course. Love Beford County as well...tried to buy a Civil War-vintage old plantation house just east of the Peak but the owner had cut off all the land except for a teeny-tiny triangle right up to the back porch and wouldn't negotiate 10 or so acres off in order to be able to make something of the place...I've forgotten the number of the road it was on, but was prime area. B&W was bought out by McDermott and internal R&D didn't look too promising and my former boss called from Oak Ridge starting a new consulting firm office at about that time so never did negotiate anything rural of our own while in VA...
It's a mixed bag...the farm economy plus oil/gas reserves are almost depleted here now have been so depressed that local economy is not at all healthy. If we didn't have the community college we'd be one of the 80% of counties I was speaking of earlier. I do like not having a high population density, I would like to see a more vibrant local economy such as we had during the post war era through about the mid-70s...
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On 19 Dec 2004 10:02:21 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

The majority of the farms in NYS are run by people with other sources of income: there just ain't enough money in it.
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Norman D. Crow wrote:

That's the way I remember it.
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Sorry I should have mentioned gasoline. and diesel.
As for the time frame, a long long time ago on the Saskatchewan prarie. I think it was to take out a red colourant.
And why in hell

Because it worked. (??) My Grandmother ran a grocery store and probably wouldn't understand (or approve of) your city words.
Those were lean days.
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Eddie Munster wrote:

But cheating didn't bother her?
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George E. Cawthon wrote:

Most people who lived through Prohibition and the Depression really don't give a damn what the government wants.
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J. Clarke wrote:

I think you missed the point. I assumed he was objecting to my use of "Hell" so I was tweaking his moral values--object to a swear/strong word but fraud.
Your comment seems to imply that to disagree and being a scofflaw are the same. Most of the people I know that went through the depression were law abiding whether or not they agreed with various laws and policies.
While we are at it maybe some definitions are needed. The depression was from 1930 to 1939, at least that's what my references indicate. Going through the depression means to me experiencing it in a meaningful way which means the person would need to be old enough to be aware of what was going on. I take that to mean that the person was born at least by 1924 and to really experience it they would have needed to be at least 15 by 1930 or born by 1915. Of course, a great number of people didn't experience the depression at all even though they were adults during the period. It depends on the geographic area, the jobs they held, and the social stratum they lived in.
Nonetheless, to imply that those born before 1915 generally approved and practiced fraud is a bit outrageous.
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George E. Cawthon wrote:

There were two overlapping events, Prohibition and the Depression. Note that I said "Prohibition and the Depression" not either/or.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Yeah, sorry I missed that addition of Prohibition. Always like it when some one adds an extraneous point in the middle of a discussion. But, the two didn't overlap much; prohibition was from 1919 to 1933. So the overlap was only 3 years. Prohibition was undoubtedly one of the stupidest laws in U.S. history and resulted in the establishment of a large criminal group and a huge crime wave. Nonetheless, I differ with your viewpoint. I'm rather thankful that I grew were people were generally honest, law abiding, and generally didn't defraud their fellow man.
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Prohibition was undoubtedly one of the stupidest

Revisionist History at its best. The gangs were there before, they were there after "the great experiment." Booze just provided a good source of quick money above the gambling, prostitution and extortion which preceded it, and the racketeering and drugs which followed.
I'm seeing a lot of "Indian" cigarettes around now that we're the second or third highest tax state in the US. More casinos, too. Did the laws cause the tribes, or just the tribe's corruption problems?
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George wrote:

Yep booze provide the money to power "organized crime." Wonder why it was not called "organized crime" before that?
Too far off topic to continue. Indian cigarettes are a minor problem in the "Indian problem." Too bad Congress never had the guts to straighten things out.
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