Plumber's tape needed?

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Most of the air lines I've seen are black steel. YMMV.

As I've said several times before, taping or doping threads makes the joints easier to disassemble. There's no point at all, obviously, in putting it along the entire length of the pipe. But then, you're the only one who's suggested doing that. <g>
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Doug Miller wrote:

I said you "could" do it, and "suggested" it would have the same value as doping the threads in a brass compression fitting. I never suggested one should do it. I understand pipe dope might make a threaded steel/iron joint easier to loosen, but not in brass, brass doesn't rust, doesn't need pipe dope to make it easier to disassemble.
--
Jack
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Of course it doesn't rust -- but it *does* corrode in the presence of weak acids, or salts.

Evidently you've never had the experience of trying to disassemble a corroded joint in brass...
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On Sat, 11 Jul 2009 12:47:32 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

...
Or gain? If a compression fitting leaks, sealant on the threads won't do a thing to help contain the leak.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Teflon tape isn't worth a toot as a sealant anyway, but it's a dandy lubricant.
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On Sat, 11 Jul 2009 19:24:12 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Or gain? If a compression fitting leaks, "lubricant" on the threads won't do a thing to help contain the leak.
In fact, since a compression fitting can be overtightened, with adverse effects, lubricant on the threads may be contra-indicated. I've never encountered a compression fitting (or a flare fitting, for that matter) where sealed or lubricated threads would be any benefit either in assembly or disassembly.
Here, I assume we are talking about compression fittings (http://www.plumbingsupply.com/compress.html ) not tapered pipe threads which seal by interference fit (compression) between the male and female threads. Another post in this thread seems to blur the distinction between those two categories.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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I didn't say that it would.

You've evidently not had the pleasant experience of ever having to open ten-year-old flare fittings on a propane line in a basement with a dirt-and-cinder floor. Humidity + cinders = slightly acid environment corrosion; I believe that the job would have been a bit easier, had the threads been doped when they were put together. Yes, I realize those aren't the same as compression fittings, but the point is that brass *can* corrode, and if it does, it *can* be much harder to disassemble than one would wish. Doping the threads before assembly avoids that problem.

My assumption also.
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Ah, you mean Teflon tape. Plumbers tape (for us old farts) refers to the metal strapping used to hang pipe.
Teflon tape or dope never hurts (well, for NatGas, use tape/dope designed for the purpose (yellow tape)).
scott
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