Panel Edge Glue-ups Without Jointing?

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I'm getting ready to glue up some panels for an electronics rack case I'm building for a client. The longest panels will be 42".
In what I think was a table saw thread, maybe a year ago, someone mentioned that they get a glue-up-ready edge joint with their table saw. I do have a jointer, but I also have a good table saw with a good blade, a long rip fence and a long outfeed table.
Any of you guys remember writing that? Anyone else glue up panels with the saw cut alone? Is there a better saw blade for this?
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Tablesaw is the only way I've ever glued up a panel. With a good blade, I don't see the need for jointing. My blade is a Ridge Carbide, but I'm sure many others leave a good finish also.
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On 10/11/10 9:33 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

You may have been the poster I was thinking about, Ed.
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On 10/11/2010 9:27 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Freud makes a "glue line rip" blade that, IME, does just that.
Although I am partial to using a jointer for preparing edges for panel glue up so that I can swap opposing edges to take advantage of complimentary angles, thereby neutralizing even the slightest deviation from 90 degrees in tool setup, I have used just the Freud blade for smaller panels with excellent results.
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On 10/11/10 9:40 PM, Swingman wrote:

I've been looking at that blade. It doesn't seem too expensive, especially considering I don't have a great rip-only blade.
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Swingman wrote: ...

What he said (on both counts)...
:)
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snipped-for-privacy@mikedrumsDOT.com says...

Forrest Woodworker II is the standard.
I use an Oldham (now sold as Porter-Cable) Signature which does fine.
If you're working with stock less than 1 inch thick and are willing to go with separate blades for rip and crosscut, the Freud LU85 and LM74 for crosscut and rip respectively would be good choices--Freud says that they do better than the Freud rip and crosscut blades that I have and the ones I have do a fine job.
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On 10/12/10 4:32 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

I have a high-tooth Freud on there, now which has served me very well. I can get that LM74 for under 60 bucks, but have been looking for an excuse to get a WWII.
Are you saying the WWII will have as good a finish as the LM74?
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On 10/12/2010 10:47 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

Once you own a WWII you will never need an excuse to buy another. AAMOF, I have two, and another is on my shopping list as we speak.
The two I will send two back for re-sharpening soon are going on eight to ten years old and I felt it was time to spring for a new one with a new job coming up.
As long as they continue to keep their old fashioned "Made in USA" quality, my shop will never be without a Forrest WWII ...
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On 10/12/10 11:10 AM, Swingman wrote:

Is that a yes on the glue line, then? :-)
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On 10/12/2010 11:15 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

Well, the WWII is a "combination" blade, optimized as an all purpose blade that does an exceptional job either ripping or crosscutting.
The Freud Glue Line Rip is optimized, in tooth pattern and setting, specifically for ripping, as well as for getting an exceptional cut.
In actual practice, and IME, either blade will work fine in most stock for making glue line ready rip cuts.
That said, not all stock is the same and, particularly with thicker hardwoods, I firmly believe that a high quality, dedicated "rip" blade is the best tool for the job if you're not going to use the jointer.
When I spend a thousand dollars on material on a project, I want every single advantage I can reasonably buy ... thus my preference for the jointer in this situation; followed closely by the Freud GLR.
I would use the WWII and would more or less feel comfortable doing so, but it would not be the first tool I would reach for.
The difference between mediocrity and supremacy is attention to detail.
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On 10/12/10 11:33 AM, Swingman wrote:

Forgive my density. :-) You say, "jointer...followed...by the Freud GLR" Are you saying the jointer to straighten one edge, then saw to width, and glue?
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On 10/12/2010 11:39 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

No ... with critical panel glue-ups in expensive stock, and once the stock is correctly dimensioned to project spec, _I_ prefer to use _only_ the jointer to prepare the edges of the stock for glue-up.
The reason I do this as already been stated ... I personally have gotten the best results with this method down through the years. The theory has always been proven in the results for my way of working. YMMV ...
Leon is one of the finest cabinet/furniture makers I have ever had the pleasure of knowing/working with.
His preference is completely different than mine in this regard, but you can't argue with our respective results despite the different preference in methods.
Whatever works for you ...
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much luck with it, I never looked back.
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On 10/12/10 12:36 PM, Robatoy wrote:

So, I get how the left and right match up with the wavy edge... like T&G. Is the base combo part of it a spacer that is half the thickness of one 'wave?"
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an exact 1/8" however you get to that. Either a dedicated router base or a shim laid on one edge (not as reliable. I can hook you up with the right router base, which you can eithew drill yourself or predrilled for your router. I don't know how much of this you're going to do, so.... I think Tom calls it SeamRite http://preview.tinyurl.com/2elob3u
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On 10/12/10 1:07 PM, Robatoy wrote:

If it's just a matter of setting the depth 1/8" up or down, I can do that and make a test cut to check it. I've also gotten pretty adept at running long stock over the router table, so that's not an issue. Funny, but this bit, with the exact offset of the outfeed fence, would function as a jointer as well.
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fence, unless the pieces were small.
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On 10/12/10 1:07 PM, Robatoy wrote:

If it's just a matter of setting the depth 1/8" up or down, I can do that and make a test cut to check it. I've also gotten pretty adept at running long stock over the router table, so that's not an issue. Funny, but this bit, with the exact offset of the outfeed fence, would function as a jointer as well.
--

-MIKE-

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On 10/12/10 1:07 PM, Robatoy wrote:

If it's just a matter of setting the depth 1/8" up or down, I can do that and make a test cut to check it. I've also gotten pretty adept at running long stock over the router table, so that's not an issue. Funny, but this bit, with the exact offset of the outfeed fence, would function as a jointer as well.
--

-MIKE-

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