OT - Man angry at Verizon hurls phones

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(Charlie Self) wrote:

I try to keep in mind the philosophy of a friend of mine, when it comes to rushing to answer the phone: "If it's important, they'll call back. If it isn't important, who cares???"
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
For a copy of my TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter, send email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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I don't have caller ID. I just don't answer the phone if I don't want to, and hang up if it is someone I don't wan to talk to. Simple and free! I have a answering machine, if I don't answer, you better leave a messege! Greg
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CW responds:

Yes. Keep in touch for what? How much is going to change here in the 3 days I'll be out next week that will be of major importance to me? The need for constantly being patted on the back, or constantly patting someone on the back, is something of an illness, IMHO, related strongly to the sickness of being unable to sit still and think without some kind of background noise filling the air.
Charlie Self "In our civilization, and under our republican form of government, intelligence is so highly honored that it is rewarded by exemption from the cares of office." Ambrose Bierce
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On 15 May 2004 20:56:02 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) brought forth from the murky depths:

A Freakin' Men, sir. I'm with the hurler.
I cannot understand the obsession people have with phones, especially since the cell phone technology is still in the dark ages. I'd like to hear on one single person who has -never- had their phone go out of range OR their battery die OR had a bad connection OR they couldn't hear/understand what the guy on the other end was saying. I'd be willing to bet that everyone who has used a cell phone more than twice has experienced at least one of those happenings at least once.
My Hawaii client called me today using her cell phone and we spent over an hour online. I had to ask her to repeat things a dozen times and she asked me 4 or 5 times.
Feh! Pay all that money so people have more places from whence to harrass you at all hours? Right. Pass!
----------------------------------------------------------------- When I die, I'm leaving my body to science fiction. --Steven Wright ---------------------------- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
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When I was in Texas, I spent over 4,000 minutes per month on my Sprint phone, talkin' to my honey in PA. It dropped the signal, now and then, and I had to plug into the charger, most nights, but it beat the heck outta paying long distance charges, and I was able to keep a relationship alive from 1,200 miles away for nine months.
It's worth every penny, and suffering through every frustrating technological anomaly, if you ask me.
Kevin
--
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Where are those Iraqi WMDs, NOW?
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wrote:

a couple of months back I turned off my house phone. now I only have a cel phone. if I don't want to recieve calls, I just turn it off. it takes messages....
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This also insures that if there is a serious emergency (tornado, flood, ect) that you can't communicate.

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Au contraire. At least here the cells are supplied with backup power, and are an integral part of our disaster preparedness plans. Wires, poles and trees don't affect 'em.
You want a hoot, try to explain to irate neighbors how they should have a line-powered phone available, not just cordless....

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All the power in the world doesn't matter when the circuits and/or frequencies are overloaded. Happens every time something big happens. Those places that do take this into account do so by shutting down service to all except emergency personnel during times of need.

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CW wrote:

I guess then that in my 35 years with AT&T there was never a need.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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wrote:

Me too.
The only time I ever saw line load control invoked was accidentally. <G>
Barry
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I'm not sure I buy that. How do they know that the cellphone in our ambulance is allowed, but the one in my pocket isn't? I've bought a lot of cellphones over the years, and have never been asked to specify if it was for the fire department or not.
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wrote:

there are cell phone overrides that will give priority to certain phones over others in certain emergency times. i believe they have to be registered with the phone companies. you can get these authorizations from local emergency officials.
they're used to get calls routed when the general public has overwhelmed the local cell towers (earthquakes, hurricanes, etc).
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On Tue, 18 May 2004 12:49:25 -0700, Charles Spitzer

I guess my point here, is that I _am_ a local emergency official, and have heard nothing about this. Maybe it's regional? Do you have any specifics on this? (email is fine, we're more off-topic than usual at the moment).
Dave Hinz
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Dave Hinz wrote:

It's called the "Wireless Priority System" (WPS) and was instituted earlier this year. See:
http://www.us.net/signal/Archive/March03/cellular-march.html
and
http://www.imakenews.com/signal/e_article000226826.cfm
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Thank you _very_ much. I'm going to get our phones authorized for it, I appreciate your (and Charlie's) time.
Dave Hinz
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While this is quite correct, of what I have seen, most place don't use the system. When cells get overloaded, nobody gets through.

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Actually, wires and poles DO affect cells, and most cellular companies are not regulated as phone companies, as far as emergency planning goes.
Very few cell sites have truly diverse feeds, as we do with stuff like 911 feeds, back to the phone network. The ones that do are usually huge, multi-company urban sites fed by major fibers. Losing a pole, or a dug up cable or fiber usually means no site with typical cells. With luck, you'll be in an area that sees multiple signals, so you can still make and receive calls.
A typical non-urban cell site is battery equipped, but does not include a generator. The batteries are there to provide enough power to allow a trailer genset to be moved to the site. The same sites that have diverse fiber feeds also usually have decent size generators.
Many companies have been known to bounce trailer mounted gensets around during large power outages, leaving them at each site long enough to charge the batteries and then moving them elesewhere.
Barry
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Wires are still needed to get the signal to all those towers. The lines going to the tower can still get knocked out.
Brian Elfert
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Underground is pretty wind-resistant.
As I drove the country for 5,000 miles in the last two weeks, I can't recall seeing above-ground service too often in those three towers (A,B, PCS) spaced every twenty miles along the trunklines. Saw a number of microwave links, though.
Not to worry, your state/county/municipal Emergency Preparedness people have already sat down with the carriers and reviewed or established new contingency plans. With 9-11, there's even money available to upgrade the necessary units to provide service in case of emergency.
writes:

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