OOOPS. The Sweat and Tears - NOW the B L O O D . . .

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So its like this 2 1/2 maple for table legs ripping to 5" wide. Then bang ouch!
http://www.connoraston.com/dotrec/cut1.jpg
Five hours in casualty (ER) and three stitches. My glove caught the blade and slammed my thumb down in the table. I was really lucky not to loose any real flesh (Nothing like you could get in combat). I have been warned by a few people about wearing gloves when machining. My question is do many of you use gloves when planning, ripping or spindle moulding. Was thinking of trying the gloves without the fingers in them or should I just give up on gloves altogether?
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Huh??? You've been worn by others not to wear gloves while machining. You had a mishap because you ignored this advice, and discovered first hand exactly why others are telling you this. Now you're if you should give up on the gloves altogether. Just does not make sense to me Connor.
Anything loose or that will otherwise present itself as something that the tool can grab is a bad combination. Common sense makes it easy to figure out why. Tight fitting gloves? Well maybe, but I'm not going to say sure. It's all about how much they present themselves as something to grab. You also lose sensitivity with gloves on. Gloves with no fingers? Can't say - it's all about how much they present themselves as something to grab.
Why is it that you feel the need to wear gloves? Skin condition? Allergic reactions to the wood you use? There could be good reasons to protect your hands, but even then you're going to need something like a latex or nitrile glove that fits very tightly. Since you're considering fingerless gloves, I doubt the above apply.
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-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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If you have no fingers, why worry about gloves?
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I do not wear gloves.
Was that the blade that got you or were you badly pinched?
The discussion of gloves came up about a few years back concerning whether a glove would be pulled into a spinning blade. I conducted an experiment on a leather fingered and canvas backed glove to see if it would be pulled into the rotating blade on my TS. I turned the saw on and pushed the glove into the blade. The blade simply cut cleanly through the leather finger with out collapsing the finger.
Was your glove torn up? If not something else may have actually happened. You may want to review how everything happened again, as hard as that might be. I was not so fortunate 16 years ago and cut off half of my thumb. I remembered it as a kick back. That was not what happened at all. I got cut after completing the cut, putting the board down on another table and turning the saw off.
Your may never realize how fortunate you are. You might want to consider www.sawstop.com . A contractor version is coming out in the summer of 06.
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Until he realizes that wearing gloves while operating machinery is a poor idea, SawStop isn't going to be enough: he also needs PlanerStop, JointerStop, ShaperStop, etc.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

Yeah. But you have to start somewhere. I would really like to hear back from him to see what shape the glove is in. I have proven that wearing a glove is not absolutely going to always cause a problem with a TS blade but I am still not going to wear a glove to see if that proof plays out the same again. Same with the SawStop, knowing that the blade will stop if I touch it does not encourage me to be careless enough that I might touch it again.
Tools with spinning parts that do not cut can be very dangerous with loose clothing. The planer, lathe, drill press will get loose clothing and pull you in.
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http://www.connoraston.com/dotrec / Above are a few more pics of the crime scene
So let me see if I get this . . . I think you are all saying DONT wear the gloves?
Its nice to get such a definitive answer to this thanks people. This has kept me out of the workshop all weekend darn. So I will try and enjoy my 39th Birthday Today. Enjoy the pics Leaon.
Connor
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You mentioned that you thumb slammed down on to the table. By any chance was that at the side of the blade? It looks like the glove thumb may have caught between the side of the blade and the opening in the insert and unfortunately a blade tooth did the actual cutting. Just guessing there. Had the tooth come in contact first I think the leather would have simply been cut and not gotten caught up. That said however had the teeth hit the glove first you probably would not have been able to stop moving quick enough to keep your thumb out of the blade. You were incredibly lucky.
BTY What kind of saw are you using?
Good luck with your recovery and for the next several months rethink your methods along with keeping gloves out of the mix.
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Sorry now I realise my thumb would have slammed into the top on the 2 1/2" maple not the table my hand was in between the fence and the blade. Its a Robland X31 with a rip blade in it. There are rough hide gloves not really soft thin leather.
wrote:

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%69%20%6c%6f%76%65%20%77%6f%6f%64%77%6f%72%6b%69%6e%67%20%62%75%74%20%69%6d%20%63%72%61%70
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Yeah!!! It all happens so fast you think you know what happens untill you start reviewing. I was the same way.

Thanks.
Seeing the picture, that was the same type glove that I pushed in to the blade and the blade simply cut with no snags.
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I never, ever get my hand or my fingers between blade and fence. Too easy to slip and ...
Actually something nobody else talked about is ripping with a radial arm, turned 90degrees. It's not the ideal tool for that job, but I actually don't have a tablesaw of my own (a friend's was resident in my shop for a few years while he was working in mine & until he built his own shop, but I do very well indeed with the radial arm and the horrible bandsaw I have). So: ripping on the radial arm. I've had it pick up an 8' stick and throw it across the room. If you've got your bare hand on that r/s stick at that time, you won't like it much. I wear riggers gloves, which are thin leather, tight fitting that don't interfere much with my ability to feel what I'm doing.
Although, I must say I go nowhere near the blade - I change sides from pushing to pulling before I get to within 18" of any moving parts.
-P.
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firstname dot lastname at gmail fullstop com
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One more afterthought; after looking at the pictures, when I have something that size to rip, I will usually cut half way through on one side, then flip it over and rip it the rest of the way on the other side. Before ripping, the board is properly face jointed and run through the planer. Then after sawing, one more trip to the jointer to clean up the saw marks, or to the drum sander. robo hippy
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Would the sawstop fire if it's a glove hitting the blade? There could be a lot of damage done before flesh triggers it.
--
Talking about art is like dancing about architecture - Frank Zappa

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Only the ones without any good sense.

Slow learner, are you? There is a reason you were warned not to wear gloves around machinery. Apparently, one serious injury was not enough to show you what that reason is. Do you need to actually lose body parts before you figure it out?
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Doug Miller said:

Just to throw some fuel on this fire, have a look at this picture:
http://www.rudeosolnik.com/images/Dad%20Turning.jpg
Notice anything odd....
No, it's not me. This is Rude Osolnik (RIP: 3/4/1915-11/18/2001). 40 year veteran wood turner and recipient of numerous accolades. http://www.rudeosolnik.com/roremember.asp
With this submitted, I will have to point out that I don't wear gloves while working, and most certainly would NEVER wear that wedding ring, a watch, necklace, or loose clothing around machinery.
But the surest safety measure is to never let your body parts come into close proximity to a potential problem - and that includes a realistic consideration of the outside forces of stock kick-back, binding, blank dismounts, catches, mechanical failure, etc.
Connor, You may be "slow", but consider that you may be in good company. ;-)
FWIW,
Greg G.
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wrote:

Well, lots of turners wear gloves -- notice that the gloved hand has an iron tool rest between it and the moving parts. Keep that hand there, and there's no danger. I'll bet he doesn't wear that glove while sanding on the lathe.
Wearing gloves while using a table saw, shaper, or jointer is just plain stupid.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller said:

Ahh... but the original quote was:
"There is a reason you were warned not to wear gloves around machinery."
There was no distinction made for lathes.
Don't misunderstand this as condoning the practice, but everyone has been relentless in chastising the guy, I thought I'd toss a bone. ;-)
FWIW,
Greg G.
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wrote:>>No, it's not me. This is Rude Osolnik (RIP: 3/4/1915-11/18/2001).

I gotta chime in here. Wearing gloves around lathes is like wearing gloves with the TS. Keep that gloved hand right there and you will be fine with a Table Saw too. Just because many or most do it that way does not mean that the danger decreases. Probably more TS users operate with out a guard than turners that use gloves. That does not make the operation a TS with out a guard even less dangerous?
You just have to be careful. If you are careful nothing will every happen. I am always careful, so I don't need any more protection. My carefulness will always protect me from harming myself. I am never, not careful.
That second paragraph, kinda sounds familiar does it not? How many times have we read comments like that in this group? Doug I am not making this reply towards you directly. I am directing this towards all of us that work with a tool that can harm you. There are thousands of woodworkers that are much better than us, have been woodworking longer than us, and use more precautions than us, just not all the time. Often we produce pieces that are close to perfect. Those better, more experienced woodworkers however are human just like us and are equally capable of making a mistake, or having a lapse of judgment, or a senior moment and that unfortunately can lead to a tragedy of varying degrees. And they just like many of us have had accidents.
None of us know all the possible ways or situations that can lead to an unfortunate event. If anyone that operates a tool thinks that he knows and practices safety enough to keep from being harmed on any particular tool he simply is not old enough yet. Time has taught many of us that we will not always be as quick, focused, or intuitive as we have been in the past and unfortunately we do not always recognize that soon enough. How many times have one of us posted a picture of one of our injuries, explained what they were doing when it happened, and some where in the explanation stated that "I knew better".
Stay safe.
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Wearing gloves, long sleeves, neckties etc while machining is just an invitation for this type of thing to happen. Consider yourself lucky and learn your lesson now instead of next time.
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On Sat, 4 Mar 2006 10:18:13 +0000 (UTC), with neither quill nor qualm,

The reason insurance is so expensive is that nobody uses any common sense any more. Going to the ER for a scratch like that is foolish, IMHO. It cost the insurance company (or your Socialist country ;) $1,000 for your little cut.
Just a month ago I bandaged a 1/2" wide x 1/8" deep cut on the tip of my finger. (I hit a coffee can lid with the tip of my right index finger when going to recycle the cans and cardboard box.) Luckily, the bone stopped it at only 1/8".
I immediately cleaned it out in lukewarm water, wrapped it until it slowed its gushing of blood, put some Bacitracin on it, and put a cloth bandaid in butterfly fashion over it. I kept it dry and redressed it daily with bacitracin. In a week, I removed the bandaid and had a usable finger again. A month later, I can't find the scar without looking very closely.
The cut I got would have taken several hours and received 8-10 stitches in the ER and cost me over $1,000. The treatment I gave to myself cost less than a buck and took ten minutes. By using common sense, I didn't have to waste anyone's money or my time. The human body knows how to repair simple problems such as this. Just clean the wound, apply an antibiotic, and dress it. Keep it clean and it heals itself quickly!
C'mon, people. Use your frackin' heads for once! Global health care systems are overloaded due to nonsense like this. (see sig)

Gloves and moving machinery are a BAD combination. They always have been and always will be. They will pull your hand/fingers into the rotating blade very quickly. You should have been taught that by your father, by friends, and in all shop classes. IOW: You should have paid attention to the MANY warnings. You're damned lucky you only got a scratch, Connor. But since you're asking the question about gloves, I see that you haven't quite learned that lesson yet. I hope you do before you lose a finger, fingers, or an entire hand.
--
The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly
is to fill the world with fools.
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