New Shop Wiring?

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Building a new shop, 24 x 24. Floor will be concrete. How practical is it to put electrical outlets in the floor for stationary machines, TS, bandsaw, etc? If not in the floor how would one recommend getting power to machines set in the middle of the shop. Are extension cords practical for both 110 and 220?
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I would run conduit across the ceiling and have recepticals hanging down on cords.
I would thing that outlets in the floor would be a problem with sawdust and dirt getting in the plugs. Of course, there are ways to prevent that.
snipped-for-privacy@cares.com wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@cares.com wrote: > Building a new shop, 24 x 24. Floor will be concrete. How practical is > it to put electrical outlets in the floor for stationary machines, TS, > bandsaw, etc?
It's not practical, you want to make overhead cable drops.
Some General Electric LW busway, 3W, 30A, 250V will do a great job.
Can do same job with conduit, but it is a lot more work, and you can't take it with you when you leave.
Allows you to have both 240V & 120V in the same busway run.
Disclaimer: I once sold this stuff by the mile, but haven't been involved for many years.
> Are extension cords > practical for both 110 and 220?
Yes.
Lew
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snipped-for-privacy@cares.com wrote:
> Building a new shop, 24 x 24. Floor will be concrete. How practical is > it to put electrical outlets in the floor for stationary machines, TS, > bandsaw, etc?
If you must have your utilities in the concrete floor, then have the concrete guys form a utility gutter in the floor, say 6"-8" wide, 3"-4" deep, covered by a removable steel grate.
Lay conduits, water lines, airlines, whatever in the gutter, then cover with grate.
You now have a way of servicing these utility feeds, if necessary.
Definitely a more costly type of construction.
Lew
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Sounds like a good idea. Do the grates have holes large enough for the more temporary runs of things like air hoses and extension cords?
How many service calls do you think it would cost to justify the extra cost?
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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Puckdropper wrote:
> Sounds like a good idea. Do the grates have holes large enough for the > more temporary runs of things like air hoses and extension cords? > > How many service calls do you think it would cost to justify the extra > cost?
Use standard grating which is available in various size openings.
Grating can be either steel or fiberglass.
Lifting the grating on a regular basis would get to be a total PITA, in a hurry, IMHO.
Lew
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wrote:

Forget service calls. The justification is in the convenience of not having power cords (even with the little 'bridges') laying all over the floor. Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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On Mon, 04 Jun 2007 05:44:06 GMT, Lew Hodgett
Possibly so, but it sure beats the s**t out of walking/tripping over power/extension cords. I've had it both ways and there's no way I'd voluntarily return to the wall plug arrangement. Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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On Mon, 04 Jun 2007 04:17:58 GMT, Lew Hodgett
I have to disagree. Completely practical. That's the way my shop is set up, and I wouldn't have it any other way. IMO, overhead cable drops are an even bigger nuisance than cords all over the floor going to wall outlets. I even have my dust collection duct runs under the floor to avoid the obstructions of stuff hanging from the ceiling. Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Tom Veatch wrote:
> > I have to disagree. Completely practical. That's the way my shop is > set up, and I wouldn't have it any other way. IMO, overhead cable > drops are an even bigger nuisance than cords all over the floor going > to wall outlets. I even have my dust collection duct runs under the > floor to avoid the obstructions of stuff hanging from the ceiling.
Whatever floats your boat.
Lew
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I'm getting ready to build a shop too.
I'll be putting some outlets in the floor. I value the airspace overhead too much to have power drops from above.
use conduit in the slab. if I think I can get away with it I'll also run a couple of 4" sewer lines through the slab- one for dust collection, the other to run an air hose through.
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On Sun, 03 Jun 2007 20:40:58 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@cares.com wrote:

How about putting in a wood floor above the concrete, with removable sections so you can run and access wiring, dust collection and compressed air under the floor?
I think that would be a little easier on your feet, too.
--
Art Greenberg
artg at eclipse dot net
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I juse went with the overhead route in my new woodshop. If your shop doesn't double as a garage, then I see no problem with power in the floor, other than the cost. If the floor is likely to ever get wet, I see problems. Oh yeh--- my shop equipment is never in the position I origianlly put it in when I built it. So, think carefully about power outlet location or you will be tripping over cords even worse than with extension cords from the wall.
Pete Stanaitis -----------------
snipped-for-privacy@cares.com wrote:

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One thing I did in my shop was to put the outlets in the walls up 4-1/2 feet. The electrical inspector said that while it was legal, he was curious why they were that high. I explained that I could lean 4 * 8 sheets against the walls and still get to the outlets ... he replied "hey good idea -- I'm going to do that in my shop!". Something to think about.
mikey
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Mike Fields, wrote the following at or about 6/8/2007 8:44 AM:

Hey, great minds think alike.<g>
To be honest, I never really gave it any conscious thought that I can recall. I just seemed to me at the time, for a workshop, the ONLY place to spot the outlets was mid-wall, where they would be easily accessible over a workbench, stationary tool up against the wall, etc. Your logic is just one more in a loooooong list of reasons to do it that way.
OTOH, out in the garage area - all the same construction project - I mixed it up with the majority of the outlets being a foot off the floor and the remainder at mid-wall.
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That is an *excellent* idea. You, my friend, are very smart.
--
Bob the Tomato


On Fri, 8 Jun 2007 06:44:51 -0700, "Mike Fields"
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If your table saw is going to be in a fixed position and not moved, and you know where it will be, put a conduit in for it along with a tube for dust removal.
Don't forget that the edges of the building will need to have conduits installed in order to get the power lines, telephone, networking, cable TV, water, drains and any thing else that you can think of. If you are installing these lines underground you don't want to have to exit through and down the outside of the wall if you can have the pipes and conduits installed from underground through the concrete into the soleplate of the wall -- keeps things much neater. As I mentioned above, install a rough-in for virtually anything that you MAY or may not use at a later date. It will simplify life later on if you want to actually add these things. You never know what you will want in the future, enough options will make the addition of something that doesn't even exist today much simpler.
I built a storage shed about 25 years ago with a couple of tubes installed through the foundation for power or whatever. Two years ago I ran a power line out to the shed, these tubes made for a simple installation. I was so glad that I had installed them years ago.

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I would not put outlets in the floor. My shop is 18 x 25, a bit smaller tha yours will be and I strongly suggest that you still put all heavy equipment on mobile bases. For my 220 volt tools I use a 30" 10 gauge extension cord for my TS, BSm and Planer. IMHO the extenwion cord is very handy and easy to deal with.
You can always have a lot of room available if you use mobile bases. Currently I have my large machines around the perimeter of the room and simply pull out the one that I need to use. At night my wife's car comes in.
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Don't forget your piss tube.
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The only shop that has a permanent layout is the one in the picture in a book. I agree on drops from the ceiling. While my shop is in the basement, all my drops 110 & 220 mid floor are from the ceiling. The one item that most people forget is the small visitors to the shop. I have a disconnect that allows me to kill the power to all the floor machines. This prevents unwanted events when unsupervised folks wander in the shop during a party or such. No one ever plans to have a accident. But it is just a little harder to have one without power. A master kill switch by the door to the shop is a one time expense. All the should haves, could haves, and would haves never erase much. Good luck Paul

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