Mounting a router in a table

I recently purchased a Bosch 1617 dual base kit and I'm building a router table based on the plans in the March 2003 American Woodworker.
My questions are as follows:
Since the kit has both fixed and plunge bases would there be any advantage in permanently mounting the fixed base to the table top without using a removable insert. I would assume this would simplify the construction and better eliminate the possibility of the top flexing.
Is there any disadvantage in removing the router motor from the fixed base to change the bit as opposed to removing the whole unit still attached to a removable insert?
Is there any case where it would be a significant advantage to use the fixed base rather than the plunge base for freehand, out of the table use?
Thanks
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Yes, no, maybe? I went trough this same dilemma a few months ago after building my table. I have the dewalt 618 with fixed, D-handle and plunge bases. First I never like using a plunge base unless I need it, too top heavy. Having never used a D-base before and after much experimenting I found I didn't want to use the fixed base anymore the D-base seems to have a lower center of gravity and I think it gives me better control. And I like having that trigger right there at the end of my finger as God intended instead of having to hunt for the switch is nice. Now quess were the fixed base is. GET THE D-HANDLE BASE ITS ALMOST X-MAS GIVE A HINT. Keith

a
fixed
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Echo exactly the same thing. Same router, same bases, same preferences, prolly even the same insert. Wouldn't do it any other way. Well - one difference, I mounted my router under one of my table saw extensions. Love it there.
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wrote:

D handles are very nice, but the OP has a Bosch 1617. The switch dosen't move on those, and the user can choose to place it on the right or the left. The 1617's motor dosen't rotate in the base like many other routers.
Barry
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With some simple bracing, the correct material and thickness top should not flex, even with a plate installed. Plates need not be expensive, and they make significantly simpler the task of accurately setting the bit cutting depth.
Now, for a quick and dirty table, drilling a hole in a piece of plywood, and screwing the router to the underside, works just fine. Clamp a straight board to the top for a fence. Clamp the whole thing to a bench or a Workmutt. Such a setup makes the building of your next router table substantially easier. It may even delay the project for many months.
Patriarch, who has a couple of these hiding under the bench to use with special bits and small parts.
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On Thu, 18 Nov 2004 05:47:37 GMT, "smd"

Most tool dealers and Amazon sell a Bosch "table kit" for about $40. It's got an extra fixed base and an adjuster knob extension. You could also look for a refurb'ed fixed speed 1617 for about $80 on eBay. This would leave you both bases and an easy way to pop the router in and out of the table.
I typically leave the 1617EVS in the table, but use the fixed speed outside the table, as most hand routed bits are smaller and don't need to be slowed down. The fixed base feels better to me, and is easier to fine adjust, so I use it whenever I don't need to plunge.

Not at all, I find this to be the easy way to change bits with the base in the table.

See above. The fixed base has a lower CG, a better fine adjust, and simply feels better in my hands. Try them both and see if you agree. You're going to want to test the machine on some scrap, as you don't want your next project to be the first time you turn the router loose. <G> Try both bases in the test.
Barry
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I do not know of an advantage but a disadvantage is that if you ever use a larger diameter bit like a raised pabel bit, the hole may be too small to accommodate. On the reverse side if you make the hole large it may be too large for shorter pieces of wood that you may want work on smaller bits.

Perhaps the room to easily drop the motor during removal. Also on that particular router It may become a hassle aligning the index pin to the correct space on the fixed base during insertion.

When doing dovetails on a jig. The fixed bases IMHO feel more controllable with lower handles.
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On Thu, 18 Nov 2004 05:47:37 GMT, "smd"

No. You need a thick top, for rigidity. You need a thin insert, otherwise you'd be mounting the router 1/2" - 3/4" lower and using that much usable bit length. You'll save a small amount of effort and build something that annoys you for ever more afterwards.
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I have the same 1617 router kit and built a table based on the same plans. (with mods of course)
I believe the plans called for 2 pieces of 3/4 inch mdf laminated together. I hope that's not going to flex too much, mine's been stable. I used a Mule $30 table insert for the router mount.
I mounted the fixed router base to the insert and use the plunge base for free hand work. I can get the wrenches into the fixed base without too much problem to change bits.
I thought I read somewhere that you shouldn't use a plunge base in a table?
I'd prefer the fixed base for free hand work.
Other notes on the router. Great router, had good reviews so I bought one. Bad switch location, and bad switch assembly. I had my switch clog with sawdust after less than a year. I thought it was totally dead but fixed it on my own(just needed to be removed and cleaned). I'll have to do it again in the future I'm sure. The metal case (magnesium?) has already corroded and needed to be cleaned off with steel wool.
Good luck
On Thu, 18 Nov 2004 05:47:37 GMT, "smd"

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