Mirror Frame

Looking for some advice:
I've made an oak frame for a large mirror and now I need to set the mirror into the frame. I've got a Fletcher point driver, but the problem seems to be that the points slip off the tool very easily and, when they do, it sends a shock through the frame which can cause the mirror to crack, even though I'm using a masonite backing board. I haven't been able to find a tool to adequately drive a point into oak without the risk of cracking the glass - they all seem geared to small picture frames. The one I have presses the point into the wood but, again, it slips. Others "fire" a point in, and that implies a shock as well.
I'm not new to woodworking and I know I could fudge something, but I want to to find something that looks good even though that part of it is facing a wall. Any ideas?
Thanks much!
Paul
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Because you should not have to replace the mirror often, simply seal the backing board in with "Mirror" grade sealer. Any glass shop should have it. Regular sealers may damage the mirror plating, should some get the back or the mirror. Typically the seal is easy to cut if replacement becomes necessary.

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is the mirror set into a rabbet in the back of the frame, or floating like a panel in a slot in the rail/stile of the frame?
if the latter, you don't have to do anything. if the former, then you can trap it with thin slats of wood or metal across the corners.
hint: i like to put butcher paper on the backs of all the mirrors i make frames for. use rubber cement to hold it to the back of the frame, not on the back of the mirror. this prevents scratches if the mirror gets slid on the wall.
you can use non-acid cure silicone glue and no points, but i'm not sure i'd do that on a very large mirror.
regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/ChaniArts
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Paul Wolsko wrote:

If the mirror is large you could use a piece of 1/4 Luan or birch plywood over the back of the mirror, not only holding it in place but protecting the mirror form scratches. You could either glue it or use small screws.
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I have always done a stepped rabbet with a deeper cut for the glass and a shallower, wider cut for the backer masonite or ply, etc. Then I use short truss head screws to hold the backer to the frame.

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wrote:

that's a good idea i'll have to steal for my next one. i make lots of frames for my stained glass panels done with mirror for hanging on the wall.
regards, charlie http://www.glassartists.org/ChaniArts
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Oak isn't the best wood for puttied-in windows, which is the usual place to use glazier's points.
In oak, you might want to use a screw-and-washer retainer, or brad-setter and moulding (shaped like glue blocks, but removable). For safety, don't rely on glue alone.
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Paul Wolsko wrote:

a couple brads to hold it till the glue dries...
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On Wed, 26 Aug 2009 14:59:18 -0400, "Paul Wolsko"

I've used these and they work great. I don't think I've used it on oak, but did on walnut recently. Sure there's a shock but it's not going to break the glass.
-Kevin
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