Lazy susan

Sigh yet another newbie question from me. How do you put together a wood lazy susan using the hardware that you can pick up at lowes or the like?
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I'm not sure what you want to know. Do you already have the wood part made and just need to add a rotating base? Or do you have nothing yet?
If you have nothing, you need to glue up some boards to the width a little more than the diameter of the tray, then cut it round. Many ways to do this. Do you have a bandsaw? Router? Jig saw? Ed
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Hi, Regina,
Like Edwin, I'm not sure what you're after. Some people have problems in figuring out how to screw the wooden tray and wooden base through the LS bearing plates, since once you've screwed one on, you can't access the screwholes to screw the other element on (this is assuming you're using the type of bearing that doesn't come apart).
Assuming that this is your problem, you'll usually find a ring of screwholes round the top and bottom flanges - these take the screws that will hold the top and base. Somewhere round this ring of screws, on each flange there will be an oversize hole between two screwholes. This is the one which will let you get your screwdriver through, so we'll call it the screwdriver hole. The procedure is:
Do any finishing needed on the top of the base and the underside of the top wooden part - let's call it the tray for simplicity. It'll be impossible to get at later.
Place your LS bearing in its intended position on the wooden base, and mark round it lightly in pencil. Also make an orientation mark on both the lower flange and the base so that you can easily line them up later. Do the same again with the bearing and the underside of the top tray
Place the bearing back on the base to your marks, rotate the upper flange so that the screwdriver hole in it lines up with the screwdriver hole on the lower flange.
Select a drill bit just smaller than the screwdriver holes in the LS, locate it in the lined-up holes and drill right through the wooden base. This is the part where you have to take into account the damage to your base - if it happens to be a genuine Louis Quinze dining table or somesuch, you need to ask yourself if a permanent hole is appropriate...
You then screw the bearing to the base, going through the screwdriver hole in the upper flange with your screwdriver, rotating the bearing for each successive screw. It'll help things a lot if you pre-bore a pilot hole, just smaller than the screw, first. Lube the screw threads with a bar of soap - that helps as well. Watch out when you're drilling that you don't go too far and break out through the other side. A bit of tape wrapped round the drill at the appropriate distance from the cutting edges can help here - just drill till you get to the tape, then go no further. Above all, make sure that the hole on the base still aligns with the hole in the lower flange.
Now turn the top tray upside down on your bench and place the bearing/base assemble upside down on top of it, making sure that it's correctly located to your marks that you made earlier - see Note below.
Now you can go down through the hole in the underside of your base and the lined-up hole in the lower flange with your screwdriver and screw down the top tray, again using pilot holes if needed.
Note: This can be a bit of a problem if the tray is much larger than the bearing flange, since you might not be able to see your marks. If this is the case, you might need to drill and screw the top tray first, then remove it and fit the base, then finally refit the top tray, using your premade screwholes as a guide.
Whew!
HTH
Frank

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