Is A SawStop Table Saw Worth the Money

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machine
So do I.
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CW wrote:

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Not hardly -- the eye injuries from radial disintegration would have it off the market in a week... :)
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
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:)
Nicely put, Edwin...
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Brian I guess what makes your comments seem so naive and scream "inexperienced" is that you keep fabricating instances that have not occurred in these threads. No one in this thread that I recall has made the comment that they are going to rely on technology to keep them safe.
Like most people know, looking down the barrel of a loaded gun is not going to save your butt if you pull the trigger and the safety is not engaged and whether the safety is engaged or not it is a dangerous move. I think it goes with out saying that most mature people realize that nothing is fool proof and that placing a body part near a blade spinning at 100 mph is still going to instill a sense of fear regardless if the operator knows that the safety device will prevent injury 99.99% of the time.
The reason that you have not had an accident yet is because the safety techniques that you practice have not yet been compromised by the mistakes that you make. Yes you make mistakes. I know you do. You are not the only that does not. Given enough use and time a mistake will happen when you are not practicing a safety technique that you are so far unaware of. If your grand father or father taught you all the safety measures that they know, you have not learned all the safety practices. Your comments demonstrate that.
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Leon wrote:

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...
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I fully agree, Leon. As another sidebar of this thread has discussed, some of us here have served on safety review committees doing accident analyses and root-cause evaluations. It is truly to be amazed by at how many of these have as at least one cause either willful disregard for accepted procedure(s) or actual disabling of one or more safety devices thus allowing or precipitating the injury.
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SNIP
As another sidebar of this thread has discussed,

Oh man, did that make my hair stand on end - again. Haven't thought about it for a long time, but all of a sudden I was back in 1964 sitting down at a punch press for day after day of punching out zillions of 2 inch parts. Even though the press was old, it was fitted to prevent getting fingers in the dies. Except that some genius must have thought that using both hands to lower the press slowed them down too much, because this one was modified. The left-hand handle was wired down and the right-handle was wired to a home-brew foot pedal, so that you could feed with the left hand, retrieve parts with the right hand and operate the press with ONE FOOT. Even though it scared the shit out of me, I knew I had to keep my mouth shut and just watch out for myself, or quit the best paying summer job I could find. I was able to maintain concentration for a couple of days, but eventually the mind-numbing repetition took its toll and a couple of times I caught myself getting out of sequence and reaching to retrieve the part while my foot was starting to come down to lower the press. Never got hurt, and didn't hear about anyone else getting hurt, but the experience obviously made an impression.
And back on topic, if I replace my Jet contractor saw, the Saw Stop will be high on my list of possibles. Even though I know I am able to prevent most accidents, some day something may distract me at the wrong moment.
Regards, PDX David
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On Fri, 8 Jun 2007 09:56:21 -0500, "Leon"

No, most people know that standing in front of a loaded gun is stupid, safety or no safety, just like reaching across a running sawblade without a guard is stupid. It isn't any less stupid because you stick a SawStop on it. Nothing is foolproof, it doesn't matter that you've got a riving knife and anti-kickback pawls, you don't go standing in the line of fire because that wood could come shooting back at you. But you know, it isn't the safety equipment that makes you safe, it's the techniquest that you use. Certainly the safety equipment can help but it can never replace just being careful and thinking about what you're doing.
It's funny, just about everyone I know who has had an accident has said "I should have known better". Yes, they should have. Accidents don't just magically happen, they are a failure on some level of the operator or the equipment.
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Brian Henderson wrote: ...

There's one nugget w/ which I agree. Of course, I had to take it out of context to _fully_ agree, but, hey, you take what you can get... :)
I said I wasn't going to add more, but hadn't seen this response at the time and this was too good an opportunity to waste... :)
BUT, the above truism said, your emphasis would say the punchpress the previous respondent talked about would be perfectly safe if it were designed originally to be operated as he described the jury-rigged operation -- after all, all it takes is the operator not failing...
Simply for your consideration of the position of safety-related design and equipment in the equation...
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wrote:>

People think that they will not get hurt on a TS are stupid. Equil logic used here.

Which just proves that they too ar human and had a lapse in judgement.
Accidents don't just magically happen, they are a failure on some level of the operator or the equipment.
Now you are getting the picture. Call it what you like practicing safety does not prevent all accidents.
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On Fri, 08 Jun 2007 23:58:57 GMT, "Leon"

But millions of people do not get hurt on a TS every year, it is only a tiny percentage that ever sustain serious injury.

It prevents the overwhelming majority of them and vastly minimizes the damage if one ever does occur. If you are never standing in the line of fire from a kickback, you will never get hit by one. If you practice good tablesaw safety, it should take extraordinary circumstances to ever get seriously injured by one. That's just a fact of life.
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If you are never standing in the line

BS!
This is simply another example of you not knowing even the more common of situations of what can happen during a kick back.
Kick backs do not always go straight back. They can and do go all directions back from the blade. Standing any where in the correct position is always in the line of possible fire from a possible kick back.
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On Sat, 09 Jun 2007 18:04:24 GMT, "Leon"

Oh sure, they can get you in the next room, around the corner too! Some have even been known to lie in wait and ambush you when you're least expecting it.
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Brian Henderson wrote:

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Those, in fact, are the most common kind... :)
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Give it up Leon. It's obvious that he's trolling just to get some attention.
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I'll tag onto Brian's comment with a bit of reinforcement. I believe he's right in that look how often we see posts here about accidents happening to folks with all sorts of safety equipment on their tools. Yet, somehow the accidents happen. Brian isn't arguing against safety equipment, he's arguing in favor of the most fundamental of all safety equipment - awareness. Wait long enough and a post will appear about someone who whacked off a couple of fingers on a SawStop saw, just like we read about kickback and fingers in blades with splitters and push sticks and...
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-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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On Sat, 9 Jun 2007 13:58:30 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

That's absolutely true. I've already said that I think the SawStop is a fine machine, at least from what I've heard and read in reviews, but it is expensive, simply because it has a piece of technology on it that doesn't stop accidents (like a blade guard, splitters, etc), it just stops you, in theory, from getting injured in an accident. I'm not saying that there's anything wrong with that, but the way to avoid injury isn't to stick another piece of nanny technology on your saw, it's to be more careful to begin with.
This isn't even like automotive safety equipment. In a car, you can still have some other idiot run into you and cause you damage, but a tablesaw is pretty much a solo piece of equipment. You're not going to get sideswiped by someone else driving their tablesaw through your shop. The cause of just about every tablesaw injury is user error, using it while tired or impaired, not practicing sensible safety precautions, making dangerous cuts, not waiting until the saw blade has stopped, etc. *ALL* of these are completely avoidable. You'll never need the SawStop if you never put your fingers into the blade, as an overwhelming majority of woodworkers manage never to do.
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Yes, they are all preventable. The real problem is human error. Aside from you, the rest of us have made errors at times with varying consequences. I certainly try my best to avoid accidents with tools, but if it does happen, it would be nice to be able to have a method of making it less serious. We have a choice available. We have the freedom to decide if we want to buy that equipment.
Eye protection, hearing protection, its all a choice in a home shop.
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wrote:

Indeed we do, at least since they laughed at the idea of requiring it on all saws.
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Brian Henderson wrote:

Actually, the CPSC responded favorably, the position paper they wrote is available by googling their site, but the other saw manufacturers filed their own brief in opposition. It's still under consideration.
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Who exactly is "they" that laughed? You must be a drama student as ALL of your statements have lot'sa drama. How's that working out for you in real life? You really need not answer that question.
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