How do I fix this finishing defect?


I put BLO on a butternut table. For some reason it came out looking "dry", even after a second application. So, I decided to varnish it. The varnish came out a bit clumpy, so I sanded it before putting on a third coat. I sanded a bit too much in one area and wound up going past the BLO. I didn't think it would matter, but it did; the varnished area where the BLO was sanded off is much lighter than the rest. Obviously I should have sanded it all down and started over, but I didn't. Instead I put a glaze over the light spot. It is a really good color match; I doubt anyone but me could tell the difference, but I see a difference in the gloss between the glazed and unglazed areas.
I was thinking of putting another coat of varnish over it all, but was afraid the varnish would dissolve the glaze. So maybe a coat of shellac?
Whatcha think? I mean other than starting over...
I have never had problems like this before; the whole project has been one foul up after another. Okay, they are all my fault, but still. But its just about done now!
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When you're in over your head, stop digging. You say you realize you should have sanded it down and started over. Good thought, go with it. Beats piling more on top.

"dry",
varnish
didn't
match;
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Toller wrote:

SNIP
I guess the first question would be, why did you put BLO on the table to begin with? If you are coating the table to enhance the grain before sealing, there are much better choices.
My guess would be that the BLO was dry to the touch, but not cured. BLO by itself can takes days and days to completely cure. But even cured, when applied by itself, it may not withstand a brushing of a "hot varnish". There you would need to look at your particular varnish and ask high VOCs from the can? Did you thin it to make it more brushable?
I would suspect the solvent in the varnish over uncured BLO if it was clumpy, and for one reason or another you were pulling the BLO off the project. Certainly application technique has something to do with it as well.
Depending on the glaze you used, you would probably just dig youself in deeper since you put the glaze on over a film finish if you put more varnish on it with a brush. I can tell you from my personal experience that solvent finishes over a the top of a glaze that is placed on a non-bondable substrate is disaster. You would probably have the feeling that you are brushing off the glaze rather than putting on finish.
At this point, I think I would leave it alone. And no more plain BLO.
Robert
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