Hand cranked Sharpening Wheel... WHERE TO GET ONE?

Greetings All...
I was in Asheville, NC, this past week. In the woodworkers shop, there was a hand-cranked sharpening wheel. The fella using it said they were common to this day... another person standing by agreed. However, I am unable to locate one on the web.
Do any of you know where I might get one other than digging through flea markets?
Thanks for your help.
William Lohr
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24 Oct 2004 15:57:38 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (William) wrote:

Do yourself a favour; get a modern motorised and water-cooled slow wheel. These old hand-cranked wheels just aren't much good for any woodworking tool with a better edge on it than an axe. The stones are coarse, the bearings aren't very smooth and hand-cranking it with one hand isn't the best way to control the edge.
If you can find a 2' diameter treadle wheel in a water trough, then you might be onto a winner. The 9" dry wheels though - best avoided, IMHO.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gotta disagree with you Andy. Krenov would also strongly disagree with you. He's a big proponent of using hand cranked because you cannot burn a blade using one. He devotes a few pages in his book to it and he grinds all his chisels and plane irons on one.
As to the quality, I also disagree with you. Its one of those "it depends" things. I bought one from ebay (Chiness clone?) that was junk and returned it to the seller. I just bought another one that is as fine a machine as you'll find anywhere. Its called Railroad grinder and sports a 7 1/2" wheel running on a one inch arbor. I got it for $22 on ebay.
A modern motorized water grinder is great - if you want to spend $300.
Bob
(William) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Good result, but there's more than one way to achieve it. A slow, wet wheel won't burn either.

I've never seen one of these that had a wheel I'd regard as usable for anything more than crude sharpening. If that's all you need, then go for it - but you'll be spending time with the 1000 grit waterstone (or local equivalent) afterwards, and you might as well start with that.
I don't have one of these things, but there are two up at my Dad's. One is old and worn, the other is older (WW2) but was brand new and boxed until we opened it. Neither has a wheel that's much good.

I'm no fan of the Tormek, because I think it's a ridiculous price and the wheels aren't very good. I've got a Record (rebadged Scan) that's about $75 and there are any number of $150 twin-wheel machines with fast and slow ends.
--
Inbreeding - nature's way of always giving you enough fingers to count your cousins

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ever notice that the arbor has a nut on it? That is so you can change the wheel. I suppose you throw grinders out when the wheel gets worn.

blade
depends"
your cousins
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You must use a different approach to sharpening than I do. I use a grinder to put a hollow ground, square shape to the edge, not for actual sharpening. I always use the stones to do the actual bevel, which begins with a 1000-1200 grit waterstone. Tonight I completely reground a plane edge using the hand grinder. After that, it took about 6-7 minutes with the water stones.

Agreed, many of the old grinders did not handle a decent size wheel either. A wheel is pretty cheap to change out.

When you say fast/slow ends, do you mean 3450/1750? When/where did you get the Record for $75? I haven't seen anything like that in current markets.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

So how often do you need to do that ? I might well do it once to resurrect an eBay special, but I don't need to do it for daily sharpening.

But what to ? Choice is pretty limited. These are 9" grinders and I've got good 9" synthetic waterstones that need water, but haven't seen anything useful as a dry stone. There's probably something out there, but not in the "cheap and easily found" category -- if I have to pay specialist prices, or rig up a water trough, then I've lost the price benefit of the hand grinder.

This sort of thing: http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pf_id !264&recno=6 http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pf_id !739&recno=4
They're a small 3000 rpm dry wheel at one end, about 150 on the large wet wheel;
The 1500 machines are generally the Creusen "red" models, aimed at woodturners. If you're doing a lot of HSS tools, these can be pretty good.

It was a bit more than $75 - 50, whatever that turns into these days. They make a couple of models, this is the small single wheel machine, not the one with the little honing roller. It hollow grounds like crazy as the wheel is so small, but then I'm only using it for initial shaping and I can take the hollow out by hand later on.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

grinder
sharpening.
Oh no, not daily! Hopefully only once or twice a year or when I slide my plane across a brad (ouch!). How often do you use the water grinder?

I'm not sure I understand. It appears you have ruled out dry grinding altogether, so yes that does limit the choice. I certainly don't propose trying to convert a hand grinder to a water grinder. For dry grinding, Norton Abrasives has a full range of choices in sizes and grits. Cost is about $20-$25.

Ah... That's virtually identical to Delta model 73-700 which someone mentioned. I don't think they are well publicized in the US. I never see them in any of the stores. Odd.

I don't think its available in the USA, at least not readily.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I don't grind nail-strikes out of my plane irons. The bench planes don't meet nails, the toolbag planes and the coarse scrub don't care.

Whenever I buy a new bagful of old tools - every couple of weeks.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is the Delta 23-700 with a fat 5" grinder wheel and a 10" upright wet wheel for around $170 or less. They also make the 23-710 with a fat 5" grinder wheel and an 8" flat lying wet wheel for ... I don't know how much.
Alex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

wet wheel for around $170

flat lying wet wheel for ...

The 23-700 seems to be a well-kept secret. I never hear about it, but it certainly looks like a good value proposition. Its sort of a contraption, with one small motor driving two wheels are radically different speeds. Do you have any experience with it?
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nope, no experience. I just knew about it and had seen a price. But I rather prefer the 23-710, flat laying disc, and it's blade holder looks substantial. I'd rather not go with a hollow grind like the 23-700 and the Tormek will give. Pretty cool gearing layout too!
Alex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Might I ask what woodworkers shop in Asheville you are referring to? I live near Asheville.
David Merrill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24 Oct 2004 15:57:38 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (William) wrote:

ebay.
are you a Lohr of the Lennox Lohr clan?
    Bridger
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Looks like you are getting no help. High quality hand crank grinders are still made. Someone posted a link to a place selling them some time ago. Unfortunately, I didn't save it. Maybe someone who did will come forward.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Prarie looks like a neat place. Here's a simple one, seems expensive compared to Prarie. Wilson http://www.lehmans.com/shopping/product/detailmain.jsp?itemID961&itemType=PRODUCT&iMainCatg7&iSubCat 6&iProductID961

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (William) wrote in message

Bought one off eBay for $10 plus shipping.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://www.lehmans.com/shopping/product/detailmain.jsp?itemID961&itemType=PRODUCT&RS=1&keyword=sharpen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Many thanks to all who replied so quickly...
I have not been to the prairie site yet, but am about to. I will keep my eye on ebay as well. It was indeed Krenov's comments that planted the first seed for this idea, and then when I saw one in action, I thought I would look further. I am finally at a point where getting my own rig is a possibility.
To the person who asked, "Where in Asheville?" I was out at the Biltmore Estates work sites. They had a blacksmith and woodworker both in action near the stables.
To the person who asked if I was related to other the Lohr's, I do not know. There are many Lohr's even around my area of Maryland, but I do not think I am related to any of them.
Again, thank you! This is such a great group!
William
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (William) wrote in message

Lehmans has one http://www.lehmans.com/shopping/product/detailmain.jsp?itemID961&itemType=PRODUCT&RS=1&keyword=sharpening
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.