Freud blade question:


I can buy a Freud blade for about 21 US$ new, this is a general purpose thin kerf blade, what benefit would I get from this blade? It would be going on my table saw which still has the original blade and is about 1 year old, I am not having any problems right now BUT, I am thinking maybe a nice new Freud would be a great addition to it.
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The thin kerf is often nice if you're not ripping large boards. I find that a nice thin-kerf crosscut blade (at least 60 teeth) makes a world of difference as compared to the (likely) combination blade that came with your saw. I don't think you can get one for $21, though.
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wrote:

Probably a decent general purpose blade but I find the thin kerf Freuds to have a little more flex than I like.
Mike O.
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I was holding it in my hot little hands a while ago at Lowes, last one at 21.97! 40t and it says general purpose. I have (and no comments, I got it cheap because I worked there for awhile) I have a Craftsman 10" table saw, it was one of the best they had last year , with cast iron table and wings and a halfway decent fence. Its been sturdy and very accurate, I set up and squared the blade when I got it and she's still holding true. I make small things like shelves and bird houses, small pieces of furniture such as end tables, But I am progressing, I want to learn to make drawers without buying tracks!? That way I can eventually make our bedroom furniture. My wife want that log style furniture, I think ( I said I THINK) I can handle that. But anyway back to the blade, is this a good blade for me or is there something else that you guys would suggest, without say spending $50.
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something else that you guys would suggest, without say spending $50.
I think it would be an improvement. I also think a lot of people on this group would recommend a far nicer blade like a more premium Freud or a Forrest Woodworker II blade, which are around $100, but worth every penny from what I've heard and read. I have a thin-kerf Freud Diablo general-purpose blade for my handheld circular saw, and it makes smoother cuts with less effort than my basic general-purpose Craftsman carbide blade. I'd be willing to bet you'll notice an improvement in smoothness of your cut if you get this blade. Definitely worth $22 in my opinion. Let us know if you get it and if you notice a difference. Andy
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It is an OK blade, but far from the best. Yes, there is a difference when you get to the $50 to $100 blades. You have one of the "best" saws they had so spend a few extra dollars and get a suitable blade for it. Smoother cuts is one big difference. If you owned a Ferrari, would you put the $1 spark plugs in it because Pep Boys had them on sale? Why compromise performance?
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Not sure what you are looking for in a replacement blade but it would make a good one for rough carpentry. It'll cut fast but the results will never compare to those of a quality regular kerf blade. It will flex on you to some degree and your cuts will not be as flat as with a regular kerf blade. If you are building furniture and using at least a contractor grade saw I would save up for a good blade that will last you. Seriously I normally recommend a Forrest WWII 40 tooth regular kerf for fine woodworking rips, cross cuts, and compound miters. If money is an issue, the Systematic regular kerf combo is also a good blade for about $60.
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For that price, it'd almost certainly be an excellent utility blade. One to provide lots of practice, practice, practice. While you figure out your needs for more expensive specialized blades. (Jim Tolpin gives a good picture of application of the variety of blades in one of his books.)
If it's better than that, better yet for you. I'd grab it in a heartbeat at that price.
J
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