Dust collection - filter/bag room?

Page 1 of 2  
I'm thinking about dust collection and wondering if people see any value to having a bag room or chamber where the filter media is housed that has the ability to be opened to the outside. In the winter you would close it up tight and expel the heated air back into the shop (or maybe a heat capture unit of some sort) and then in the warmer months you could just open it to the outdoors so as to avoid recirculating any very fine dust. Or should I be shooting for efficiencies that would make it unnecessary? The shop I work now is simply awful and surely unhealthy. For my own, I want it clean. JP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Noise reduction would be a good reason to build a room or compartment for the DC. Some DCs get hot while running, so they need a supply of air to keep them cool.
Take a look at Bill Pentz's dust collection pages when you have a few hours.
You might want to consider looking in to an air cleaner as well. Simple ones can be made with box fans and furnace filters, but better ones filter better and are much quieter. The air cleaner is just to clean the air up after you get done working, it's not a second line of defense like a DC. As a bonus, you can get charcoal filters that absorb some finishing odors.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 25 Feb 2012 22:58:27 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

Yes, be sure to RTF label.
-- Courage and perseverance have a magical talisman, before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish into air. -- John Quincy Adams
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yebbut those labels are just legaleze, right? That stuff can't acually hurt you. I hope. JP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 26 Feb 2012 09:25:59 -0800 (PST), JayPique

Oh, of course not.
P.S: Enjoy your trip through the medical system...if you get that far.
P.P.S: I love the new product manuals for woodworking tools. There are at least ten pages of warnings, cautions, and tips prior to the one or two pages of instructions. Then come the exploded diagrams of parts you can't order until they have at least 1,000 orders in for that specific part.
-- Courage and perseverance have a magical talisman, before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish into air. -- John Quincy Adams
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JayPique wrote:

Depends on where you live. In south GA I am more concerned about the noise. My dust collector is behind the shop under a shed. That way I get much less noise and the fine dust that goes through the bag is outside the shop.
If saving heat is very important, a separate small room would be ideal, but I would put a really good filter between the room and the shop. Emptying bags can let loose dust, which you would not want wafting back into the shop.
A home made separator is worth it's weight in gold. I used a 20 or 30 gal fiber drum with a metal lid. Two elbows are under the lid and through the lid for the hoses to clamp to, with the elbows pointing in opposite directions does the job. I just cut the holes and secured the elbows with hot melt glue or epoxy.
--
Gerald Ross

If an experiment works, you must be
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JayPique wrote:

Or, you could despense with the filter bag all together and duct the output of your impeller into a small structure (mine looks like an outhouse) outside the shop.
This setup has two advantage
!) It gets the dust outside the shop.
2) It drastically increases the CFM of your system.
My system uses a cyclone (with a collection can) between the ports and a HF impeller (cheap and it was actually taken off their largest DC) which then ducts the fine dust outside the building.
Deb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

through a wall and the noise level is much less, as most of the sound is through the exhaust. He has an Oneida similar to mine and both machines pick up most of the dust into the barrel anyway. I want to put my machine or at least the exhaust outside, as I live in the country.
What I really want a setup, which would be beyond the requirements of most in this group, that would pump dust from the cyclone into an enclosed trailer, for reasons of convenience. I have dust going into a 55 gallon drum, and it seems like I spend a lot of time emptying it.and carting it to the dumpster. My profits haven't been high in recent years, so I have put this on the back burner, like a lot of other things.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Get multiple 55 gallon cans... then you can swap them out and in one operation empty multiple units out.
If you live in the country it can be mixed in with mulch, if there is no walnut.
On 2/27/2012 5:21 PM, woodstuff wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"tiredofspam" <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in message

the corner and there is not much room to move around a barrel. What I do now is to shovel the dust into another can with a contractor trash bag in it and roll it out to the front door and put it into a wagon and go to the dumpster. I think that I should just put up a lean-to shed on the side of the building later. The duct work is really expensive for me right now, so that all may just have to wait. Thanks for the input :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 28 Feb 2012 22:12:28 -0600, "woodstuff"

I ordered a 50' length of flexible hose. It flops around when you start the DC, but it works just fine. $60 at Amazon. ($40 when I got it.) The vinyl was offgassing horribly when new, so I left it outside for a couple weeks. It didn't stink after that.
-- ...in order that a man may be happy, it is necessary that he should not only be capable of his work, but a good judge of his work. -- John Ruskin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't you love that off gassing.
I find that the Chinese products do that. Not from anywhere else. I bought some new tires for a handcart (not used on a handcart though). And they stink years later. They were made in China. I have an air hose made in china, 2 years later, it still stinks...
My made in the USA air hose never smelled.
On 2/28/2012 11:39 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/29/2012 9:21 AM, tiredofspam wrote:

Having worked in the automotive world in my past profession I started in the tire business while going to school, I eventually had my own tire store that I ran for Ameron Automotive Centers.
Anyway, if you don't think rubber made anywhere else stinks, have a walk inside a tire ware house. I oddly have a very fond memory of that smell. And they still smell the same as they did in 1972.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, but they lose it over time. This set of tires hasn't lost any of it.
And normally they smell different, this smells like it was burnt to a crisp... Not the normal rubber smell. I know it is vulcanized, but these babies are cooked....
I left them outdoors in the rain and sun, and nothing changed. Needless to say it is one stinky cart..
On 2/29/2012 10:45 AM, Leon wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That's logical. Hoses don't have noses. (couldn't help myself)

Tires, huh? I fondly remember the smell of latex with Nonoxynol-9 on it, myself. <domg>
-- ...in order that a man may be happy, it is necessary that he should not only be capable of his work, but a good judge of his work. -- John Ruskin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Oneida DC has a 7-inch exhaust and I have to buy some fittings and spiral pipe, as well as some type of cover where it goes outside. For the shop, I have to put up some unistrut to hold the electrical conduit, air lines, and DC Pipe. Then there are the fittings to drop down to the machines, etc. It will cost me alot of time and money. Currently, I have my single phase and three phase stuff on the floor in large cords and my dust collection running in pvc under the outfeed table and assembly table with the rest running in 4-inch on the floor. Not really a good situation, I know.
After Feb, 2010, I had no calls, bids, or drop-ins for months and made no money. I was forced to go to work for a countertop company out of state and do some remodeling in Memphis just to stay alive. During that same period, some of my friends with big shops were calling me asking for any jobs I might have. Thanks be to God almighty 2011 and so far this year, I have had good jobs and some degree of prosperity. Still, I don't want to spend very much on the shop that I just don't have to.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/25/2012 10:48 AM, JayPique wrote:

I dont find the noise of a DC any worse than a machine that it is collecting dust from, so I see no need to isolate it. Unless you are talking about a huge multimotor unit.
If you buy a DC with a pleated canister filter recirculating dust is not much concern either. MY DC stays pretty much dust free on the outside compared to most of my other equipment.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I checked out a lot of stuff and I ordered the Clearvue cyclone system (http://www.clearvuecyclones.com /) which has Bill Pentz's imprimatur. (http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/index.cfm ). Reading Pentz's site is pretty useful, IMNSHO. With the right good filter, you should not have any fine dust in your shop.
Like you, I am concerned about losing heat, especially since I live in the Yukon. However, I have to put the cyclone outside mainly because of space and the ceiling height in my shop (7 feet). I rerouted the filters back into the shop so I would not lose too much heat. I am still building the system, so I don't know how it will pan out.
Luigi
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 26 Feb 2012 20:12:16 -0800 (PST), Luigi Zanasi

Crikey, $1,500 for almost-a-HEPA?

Oh, don't worry, WeeGee. You live in the Yukon. You never had any heat to begin with.

Just insulate the hell out of the little shed you build around the cyclone system and use a rubber gasket on the door. No biggie.
Congrats on the new toy, BTW.
-- Courage and perseverance have a magical talisman, before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish into air. -- John Quincy Adams
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For the same price, one can get a real HEPs, from a more proven manufacturer.
I guess a Penz endorsement trumps quality.
-- Andy Barss
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.