dewalt batteries in firestorm drills.

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fair enough, but i really dont think that the young lady on the phone with me at b&d was thinking along those lines.

well, i'd rather have a battery that i know will never nuke my motor, given that ive already been burned once. literally.
you are saying use the dewalt battery pack, and be aware of the limitations. this would be like driving a car which would suffer engine damage if you went over 55mph. doable, but nerve wracking.
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No, I am saying regardless of what battery pack you use if you push the drill beyond its limits it will eventually fail. A weaker battery pack will still burn the motor up if the motor is under a constant strain. Having a stronger battery pack may supply the power to ease the strain.
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well, i guess i still have to play it conservative. i dont have any way of quantifying whether or not i should expect theoretical damage to the drill, and my practical experience seems to match up with the doomsayer version of the dewalt-firestorm debate.
thanks for your help, though.
anthony
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I don't understand that. 18V is still 18V.
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wrote in message

the way i understand it, 4A of 18V is a different bird than 2A at 18V, and the motor just might not like the former. (current figures not real, logic possibly mistaken too;)
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wrote in message

But does not the motor draw the amps versus the battery pushing the amps? Corded tools draw only a few amps, but are commonly plugged into circuits capable of supplying 15, 20, or 30 amps.
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When you turn on the tool the voltage across the battery drops, you can demonstrate this with a voltmeter on your car pretty easily. in fact in some cars with voltmeters on the dash you can see it from the drivers seat. The voltage drop will be less with a higher rated battery, so more current will flow through the circuit. The key to understanding this is that batteries have resistance too.
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Thanks. I understand basic electricity, but I'm not an EE
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/woodworking/dewalt-batteries-in-firestorm-drills-285618-.htm nopcbs wrote: If we are talking using a higher voltage battery in a tool designed for a lower voltage battery, then, yeah, you can do some damage...especially in extended runs. However, putting any 18v battery as the energy source for ANY 18v drill is NOT going to hurt the drill at all. 18v is 18 v and it matters zip where it comes from. What the differences in the batteries do determine is how long the drill will run in normal use and (if the drill motor has to work against a too high load)how easilly it will stall because you have drained the battery against a stalling load.
Now if you stall the drill then you can damage it using a larger capacity 18v battery simply because the better battery will not go dead as quickly as the weaker one will and you will be running current through a stalled motor longer, over-heating it and damaging it. The weaker (less current capacity) 18v battery will be delivering near 0v while the better battery will still be supplying 18 v.
Don't abuse the drill, and it will thrive with either battery...it will just do it longer w/o recharging with the better battery.
- nopcbs Lawrence Wasserman wrote:

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