Designing

Page 1 of 5  
I know there are quite a few software people here. Even if you're not one of them, I hope you'll still get involved in this thread! In software engineering, we learn to put a lot of effort into design (and the more of it we do, the better we appreciate that approach, I think).
Question: Assuming you a a hobby-ist and not someone running a small business, do you spend a large percentage of your time in woodworking in designing your projects? Do you think of designing as "part of the work" or "part of the fun"?
I don't really want to interject my own answer here, but I rather enjoy drawing things out with SketchUp (and I feel confident the quality of my woodworking will be the better for it). In my teenage years, the last time I had the resources to work with wood, I would get to the cutting in minutes--in fact, I probably often started by looking at the woodpile...lol. Feel free to put your own spin on the question.
Bill
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
 Do you think of designing as "part of the

Inspiration comes from many places. Often I see something I want to reproduce. Often a glance at the wood pile inspires and I do a quick sketch and start cutting. Often I take weeks (or more) doing variations of a design to get it just right.
One note, is anything on paper does not convey scale and 5 minutes slicing cardboard to mock up the actual size of something can be very instructive. I designed a plant stand that once instantiated in wood was too big to even be sold as a lecturn.
As an FYI, I often find myself usingthe Agile method (which we use in SW design in my real job) on my wood projects where design refines over time during creation.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 11 Jan 2011 08:44:26 -0800 (PST), SonomaProducts.com wrote:

was to have something that two people could move around when the ground became less than pleasant under them. Armed with a mental design incorporating materials on hand, the finished houses require two people, a couple of come-a-longs and a backhoe to move.
basilisk
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Do you think of designing as "part of the

Inspiration comes from many places. Often I see something I want to reproduce. Often a glance at the wood pile inspires and I do a quick sketch and start cutting. Often I take weeks (or more) doing variations of a design to get it just right.
One note, is anything on paper does not convey scale and 5 minutes slicing cardboard to mock up the actual size of something can be very instructive. I designed a plant stand that once instantiated in wood was too big to even be sold as a lecturn.
As an FYI, I often find myself usingthe Agile method (which we use in SW design in my real job) on my wood projects where design refines over time during creation.
For the sake of insuring that what ever I build will fit, I quite often draw the room with its contents and add the project drawing to see how the project is going to fit in. Through that approach out the window if you ever move. ;~(
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Do you think of designing as "part of the

Inspiration comes from many places. Often I see something I want to reproduce. Often a glance at the wood pile inspires and I do a quick sketch and start cutting. Often I take weeks (or more) doing variations of a design to get it just right.
One note, is anything on paper does not convey scale and 5 minutes slicing cardboard to mock up the actual size of something can be very instructive. I designed a plant stand that once instantiated in wood was too big to even be sold as a lecturn.
As an FYI, I often find myself usingthe Agile method (which we use in SW design in my real job) on my wood projects where design refines over time during creation.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Agile as a method is much easier to apply to software. Once you get past a certain point with wood it is impossible to refine the design without scrapping the work.
--
"He's not the Messiah. He's a very naughty boy! "
Brian's Mum
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/11/11 11:31 AM, Bill wrote:

Note, I do not build fine furniture, but I have built a desk, workbench, closet doors, storage cabinets, decks, and benches etc.
Mostly is rolls around in my head a day or two, then a quick sketch, and on to making sawdust. On two occasions my wife provided the quick sketch of what she wanted, I just built from there after an hours thought.
Don't take this personally, but you seem to go for the government approach of designing a $100,000 hammer, when $50 will do just fine.
Too much planning and thought, leads to more questions, ad nauseum, the little details seem to fall out in the process for me, I did the same process with computer programming, think a bit about the problem, and then start coding.
--
Froz...


The system will be down for 10 days for preventive maintenance.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FrozenNorth wrote:

Somehow that reminds me of the Octopus Lew told me about. I'm not going to spend $100,000 on it, as I don't have it and wouldn't even if I could. But I'm at the point in my life where I am willing to send flowers... I no longer drink or smoke--and I'm pretty sure that puts me ahead, even after the flowers, along with probably just about any power tool you would ever want to have... When I paint my shop this spring, I'm not going to use the cheapest paint I can find--even if it stings a bit, even though the cheapest paint I can find would probably work just fine. Hope that helps you understand my point of view. YMMV. BTW, I did not take your message personally. Your point of view is well-taken.
BTW, my hammer is worn out (rubber handle covering is loose) and I have been debating whether to get the Estwing with the laminated leather grip or the regular model. So far I haven't been able to justify the $7 extra for the former. I hope that helps you understand where I'm coming from. Living gives us, if were fortunate, the freedom to make choices.
Bill

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/11/11 2:33 PM, Bill wrote:

product, but once I decide I need something, a bit of research and I try to get the best mid range product out there, subject to local availability, i.e. I avoid WalWart like the plague.
Just saying over-thinking and over-designing something, sometimes leads to less flexibility when the actual implementation time rolls around.
To each his, or her, own. :-)
--
Froz...


The system will be down for 10 days for preventive maintenance.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FrozenNorth wrote:

Yes, in the case of the DP baseboard, which I suspect you may have been referring to, I just wanted to do the project. Amusingly, it's usually other who put the lofty design features in my head. I generally start out quite naively with "simple and cheap" and folks help me out from there! Its cheaper than buying boats and new cars.
Good point about "over-thing and over-designing". That sounds like the voice of experience talking! I appreciate the lesson.
Bill
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The 'over' thing is sometimes known as First System Syndrome in SW development. Folks try to fit in everything they know in that first system and frequently fail. An unfortunate few never get over the first system and try to do it Over and Over. Think about French Polishing an Adirondack Chair.
--
"He's not the Messiah. He's a very naughty boy! "
Brian's Mum
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or creeping featuritis.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

I assume by "first system, you mean the first version. I don't know what you mean by "fit in everything they know". Actually, I think it's more than fair to say that the better the view of the big picture at the beginning of a project the better the final result. The users should be clear about what they want. Complexity doesn't justify failure. Staff and schedule accordingly. By all means, build a prototype, but that's just part of the process/conversation.
An unfortunate few never get over the first system and

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Every feature possible, just in case you might need it some day (or someone might want it, in the case of product development).

Pretty soon you have to fish or cut bait.

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

The philosophy of the contractor I worked for was that we could do anything the customer would pay us to do. The important thing is to capture the specifications in writing, rather than letting the customer keep coming up with new ideas. Very much like has been discussed here regarding woodworking contracts, fees for changes, etc.
Bill

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/13/2011 11:02 PM, Bill wrote:

Babbage's Disease
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Right, your job is to get the customer to want the feechurs, *after* you've signed the fixed-price contract.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

There was always something in the works with our customer. We continually developed two systems simultaneously so that we could provide new versions faster. Our customer (Uncle Sam), always had new wishes. We were not sneaky about it. Just firm.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ah, government work. The money's not coming out of anyone's pocket, so it comes out in *buckets*. Been there, though not for long.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I was doing that I'd write the system test before a single line of code was written and the customer would Sign off on it. Every line in the System Test was cross referenced to a function in the Specifications, which they had also signed.
--
"He's not the Messiah. He's a very naughty boy! "
Brian's Mum
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
someone said:

Every feature, every concept they can stuff into it.

Ayup.
Engineer Joe sez the Marketing Dept sez: "If it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet."
-- A paranoid is someone who knows a little of what's going on. -- William S. Burroughs
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.