Are there realy people who don't even own a set of screwdrivers?

Drove to San Luis Obispo yesterday, where a neighbor has kids going to school there, so she came along to visit her kids living in an off campus apartment.
When I came to pick her up, the kids asked me to fix something.
I asked where the screwdrivers were. They don't own any.
I knocked on the door across the hall. They don't own any either.
No screwdrivers. No pliers. No hammer.
No tools.
I used a butterknife.
Amazed me though. They all had iPhones but nobody had a screwdriver.
Are there really people who don't own any typical hand tools?
How do they fix anything?
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On 9/14/2018 12:09 PM, Arlen Holder wrote:

I know of two people like that. OTOH, I have #2 Phillips screwdrivers all over the house.
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Ifthere isn't an app for it, they're SCREWED - no screw drivers required!
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Nope. I can eye it closer in many cases.
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On 14 Sep 2018 19:34:30 GMT, Clare Snyder wrote:

Since camber has to be tested parallel to the wheel, and since most levels touch the tire bulge, I wonder if the accuracy of the phone angle indicators is enough to do rear camber on the bimmer?
The spec is negative two degrees (plus or minus something like a tenth or so) where I have it set currently to just shy of zero degrees (that's the most it would go) for tire wear reasons, where I'd have to look up the plus or minus, but I'd be happy at just being able to measure it to a quarter of a degree.
Do you think those phone angle measurements can measure to a quarter of a degree in the minus one to two degree range needed for camber.
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On 9/15/2018 10:38 AM, Arlen Holder wrote:

I'd trust it to hang a picture frame on the wall, not for a setting that affect $500 worth of tires.
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On Saturday, September 15, 2018 at 11:08:44 AM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

+1
I remember a guy who was an electronic service tech at a company decades ago. He was a nice guy, but had a hard life, a kid that was partially disabled, he was struggling all the time, never had enough money. But part of his problem was that he wouldn't take sound advice or use common sense. He was known for driving an old Dodge and having spare parts in the trunk, swapping stuff out when the car stopped on the way to a customer, etc.
One day he was telling us how he was going to replace the torsion bar in the front suspension on the car himself. He was living in an apartment and had limited tools. We were skeptical about the wisdom of that. I have no experience with it, but would expect that the torsion bar is loaded with tension and you might need multiple jacks or something to be able to both raise the car to get under it and to also take the tension off the bar. Whatever, you may be able to do it, but without having the right tools, doing it in an apt complex where they generally don't allow you to leave cars up on jack stands, etc, it didn't sound like the best idea. On Monday he comes in with his arm in a sling, he didn't break it, but he injured himself enough to need the sling.
So, days later, he's telling us he has that done, now he needs to align it. He proceeds to tell us he can do that, by measuring this, measuring that, etc, etc. We're like, Joe, I doubt you're going to get it right and you can get it done for $75 at a shop. And if it's not right, you'll ruin your tires. But he insisted and did it himself. A couple months later he's telling us about his latest misfortune, his tires are going bald and he has to buy new ones. I came to the conclusion that much of his misfortune was of his own doing.
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On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 12:09:32 PM UTC-4, Arlen Holder wrote:

They call their friends (or friends' parents) who have tools.
My family made sure I had a little tool kit when I went off to college.
Cindy Hamilton
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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 14 Sep 2018 09:43:09 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I was given a Handy Andy tool set when I was about 8 Some tools were for children only but others were full size.
I have a bunch of screwdrivers in the house, another in the car, and when I take a long trip, I bring a little shirt-pocket screwdriver with 2 phillips and 2 flat. Plus a tape measure, mini-volt-ohm meter, flashlight, and iirc, something else.
When I went swimming in salt-water with my car key, with the screwdriver, I was able to open it up and replace the battery. It didn't help.
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On 9/14/2018 11:09 AM, Arlen Holder wrote:

  Yes there are people that don't own any tools . They call an overpriced service guy to come and fix anything that breaks/quits , etc - including replacing light bulbs ! Probably a good thing though , they'd hurt themselves or break things worse if they tried to repair anything .
--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
  Click to see the full signature.
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says...

With a post like yours, I would have thought you would have one of the very basic tool kits in you car. I have had one for years. Now I have the Harbor Freight $ 30 ( on sale) kit in my car. Good enough tools to get many jobs done in a pench.
Some do not have the basic tools in their house. I really like the insurance commercial where there are two teenage boys that can not even change their flat tire.
That information should be part of the drivers education course in school.
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On 9/14/2018 1:31 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

My daughter knew how to change the oil and change a tire. She would just call one of the guys she knows and they would do it for her.
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Both of my girls had to manage changing a tire before they got the keys to Mom's car. Both have also changed their own oil - once.
They both have CAA but generally use COD insted (Call Old Dad) -a little less from #2 daughter since she married a truck mechanic - - -
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On 09/14/2018 11:31 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

You're living in the past. With some of the new cars there's nothing to change a flat tire to. At least mine has a donut. I was going to put a real tire in but it doesn't fit.
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says...

I may be living in the past. My last car is a 2017 toyota and it has something to change to so you can get to a place to get a new tire or the old one patched.
Seems that I do remember about 20 years ago some companies were sending out the cars with out spares as there was a tire shortage.
What kind of an idiot company puts out cars without a spare of somekind ? More important, what idiot buys a car with out some sort of spare ?
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On 09/14/2018 09:23 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I ride bikes. Except for the Urals with the side hack they tend to come without spares.
My 2011 Toyota does have a donut but that's my second line of defense. The string path kit and pump is my first.
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On 14 Sep 2018 20:32:05 GMT, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I agree that a donut works. It's also a *lot* easier for women to put on the car in an emergency. I've even driven about 1000 miles (worn to the belts) on a donut.
But ...
What on earth is the advantage of a donut for most people?
Why do they even put them in the car?
They take up (almost) as much room, don't they? I mean, how much space is really saved?
They're almost as heavy, aren't they? (In terms of percentage of a 3000 pound car I mean.)
They must cost almost as much.
What on earth is the *advantage* of a donut?
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On 9/15/2018 10:44 AM, Arlen Holder wrote:

Advantage is to the car maker, not the owner.
Lighter for better fuel efficiency, cheaper. No space is saved as the well is often big enough to accommodate a full size tire.
The donut is an advantage as compared to a can of fix-a-flat though.
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On 9/15/2018 10:21 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

...

...

+22
Add up a few pennies over thousands of vehicles and the bean-counters love it.
The mandates placed on manufacturer's fleet mileage numbers mean they'll do whatever it takes to gain a few hundredths here, a few more there...law of unintended consequences strikes again.
--


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On 09/15/2018 10:38 AM, dpb wrote:

https://www.ericpetersautos.com/
Disclaimer: Peters is a libertarian and sometimes starts to rant but he's often spot on about what stupid government regulations wind up costing consumers.
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