Cutting thick dowels on band saw


I have to cut a large number of 2" diameter walnut dowels. Is there a safe way to do this on a nand saw? Would a band saw or a table saw be best? Thanks
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Robert Kline wrote:

If those are th only choices, I'd say BS, but a lathe is designed to do what you're asking for. Failing that, spoke shave or broom planes comet to mind if you don't have a dowel making tool. I'm sure it could be done with a router, but I'd use the lathe, myself. The cheapest midi lathe will do the job, and allow you other projects as well later on.
Dave in Fairfax
--
Dave Leader
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Robert Kline wrote:

There are lots of ways of doing this job; however, if you are limited to a table saw or a band saw, I'd probably use a Vee block with a sled on a table saw.
The vee block and the sled provide complete support while the dowel is being thru cut and the sled provides a place to locate the stop for making repetitive cuts.
Lew
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I think Dave was thinking you want to turn the dowels from square stock. Assuming you already have the dowels and only want to cut them to length, Lew has good advice. I would only add that you can do the same thing, with a slightly rougher result, on the band saw, but you must incorporate a clamp into a v notch sled, which could run in the miter slot of your saw, or else the blade will be likely to grab the dowel and try to turn it, jamming the blade and possibly injuring you and or the blade and saw.
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Hold the dowel with a wood clamp; parallel jaw wooden type. This will keep the dowel from turning.

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A small vise would be better yet. Turn it upside down so stock is on the table.
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Send me a few dozen, I'll determine the appropriate method and get back to you.
B.
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Make a jig attached to the tablesaw miter. I think the table saw will be more accurate and faster than the bandsaw. A miter saw is probably my second (close) choice.
On Sun, 24 Apr 2005 11:36:22 -0500, Robert Kline

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wrote:

I think I'd do it that way and set up a stop block on the fence to feed against. In any case, be sure it is a safe setup. Doing repetitive "mindless" work is easy to get lax with because you are more interested in just getting it done that doing it safely.
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Possibly less waste with a band saw. For a large number you might consider an attachment to the miter guide that provides a stop on one side of the blade and a (wooden) v-block with a toggle clamp on the other side to hold work while cutting.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA www.iedu.com/DeSoto/
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wrote:

Robert... had the same problem last year, but with 3/4' dowel for bench dogs..
What worked great for me (on the TS) was to drill a 3/4" hole in a 2x4 and clamp it to the miter gauge, with a stop block on the fence.. just push through until it stops and run through the blade..
mac
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