Cross-cutting 2x6 on Delta miter saw

I've used my 10" Delta Shopmaster compound miter saw for several years now on 2x4 and smaller stock. No problems at all. However, when I just cut a nominal 2x6, about 1/4" on the outside, bottom corner was not cut by the blade. The blade bottomed out leaving this corner unscathed.
The fence is, by default, as far to the rear as it can be.
Because the sticker on the base of the saw table says that it can cross-cut a nominal 2x6, I'm surprised that I had problems. Of course, I had the board laying on a face rather than an edge, but I assumed that is how it should be placed.
Is my experience unique? What should I do the next time I cut a board this size?
Thanks,
Rich
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In rec.woodworking

You can sometimes place a spacer under the board and raise it up enough to cut it.
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D'oh! Why didn't I think of that? :-)
Many thanks, Bruce,
Rich
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Rich:
Check again on the fence. I was able to move the fence on my Delta enough that it cuts completely through a 2X6.
Marv

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try a 3/4 inch scrap spacer board under the good piece , this will raise the good piecr up and allow more of the blade to cut
Rich Shepard wrote:

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First check to see if your blade is actually 10" Then check the down stop and see if it is adjusted properly Lower the blade as long As you don't hit metal. After that do as others have suggested raise the peice your cutting

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I got a B&D 10" miter sa and it has the very same problem. Try carefully lifting the front edge of the board with your hand you are holding the board against the fence with. Make sure your fingers and thumb are away from the blade in case something goes wrong. For woodworking this a concern.......for carpentry work I finish the cut with a sharp utility knife. Hope this helps. Lyndell

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Instead of moving the fence BACK, try moving it forward. The arc of the cut is what you are running into, and moving the board forward (assuming that it cuts OK at the front edge of the board)
John
On 2 Jan 2004 21:08:18 GMT, Rich Shepard

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I've had similiar experiences with my CMS.
Two thoughts: 1) When I was working on some decking I just raised the front end of the board up a bit, to the blade. 2) Place a piece of scrap beneath the 2x6. This will raise the board to a wider part of the saw blade, sort of which John was referring to, I believe.
Ron
wrote:

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On Fri, 02 Jan 2004 21:08:18 +0000, Rich Shepard wrote:

Cut three at a time (flat) on your RAS?
Sorry, I couldn't help it,
-Doug
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Its not too hard to flip it and continue. Before starting the blade, lower it into the groove you made on the first cut, so its calibrated. Then raise it, start the blade, and make the cut.
--
The software said it ran under Windows 98/NT/2000, or better.
So I installed it on Linux...
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