compressed-air drills

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On 5/23/10 6:09 PM, Josepi wrote:

I'm not buying anything you wrote in this post.
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-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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They sure do around here. I think one house of six, built in the last year in my neighborhood, had a hammer on the property. They aren't too bothered scrambling around on the rafters.
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I drove over 2000 screws with a cheap off-brand cordless 14.4 v drill when I built my deck.
--
“The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people’s
money.” - Margaret Thatcher
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On Sun, 23 May 2010 10:47:22 -0600, Dave Balderstone

I drove 700 or so in the deck then another 2000 in the floor of my house, with my 14.4V PC. I did have one of the packs rebuilt ($35) after the 2000.
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On 5/22/2010 8:35 PM, Ignoramus16466 wrote:

fine. Unfortunately I am going to have to do it again as the Trex is decomposing. They replaced all the Trex in my buddies deck, but do not supply the screws. And I had about $230 in stainless deck screws in my deck.
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We have a few hundred square feet of deck to do and always figured we would go the Trex route.
Lately I have been reading a lot of bad stuff about these brands with molding and rot. Apparently the answer is to use a mold prevention wash a few times a year on the maintenance free surface....LOL
all the Torx head screws in my Trex deck. Works fine. Unfortunately I am going to have to do it again as the Trex is decomposing. They replaced all the Trex in my buddies deck, but do not supply the screws. And I had about $230 in stainless deck screws in my deck.
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Wondered about the wood components in it. I have some Veranda on my weather station. Hope it stands up to weather.
Seems to be a lot of plastic in it. Saw had long stringers on it.
They might have cut back on plastic from R&D to save money and now find the facts.
Thanks Guys - great info.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net "Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
On 5/26/2010 7:00 AM, Josepi wrote:

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"Doug Miller" wrote:

That's one of the reasons pressure regulators exist.
Buy the time you buy a regulator, lubricator, filter package, 100 ft of 1/2" hose and quick connect couplings, the cost of a couple of batteries starts looking pretty good.
Lew
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Have all of that already...
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Air pressure regulation will still give you high speed but low torque capabilities. This will tend to make deck screwing uncontrollable and you will need to follow up the heads with a battry drill afterwards (tripping on a few) to set the head depths.
That's one of the reasons pressure regulators exist.
Buy the time you buy a regulator, lubricator, filter package, 100 ft of 1/2" hose and quick connect couplings, the cost of a couple of batteries starts looking pretty good.
Lew
"Doug Miller" wrote:

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On May 22, 10:26pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I just finished building a deck this weekend. My cordless batteries did poop out, without available charge, a couple of times but no big deal. However, during those periods I had to dig out my old faithful Bosch corded drill. It did fine but awfully torquey and I had to be careful not to bury the screws. The biggest problem was dragging that ^%&%# cord around. The cordless tools have spoiled me and dragging an air hose around is worse. As I was completing the project, I jumped on Amazon and ordered a couple more cordless batteries. In my opinion, updating your cordless capability is a better solution.
BTW, I have a couple of air powered drills and both have fairly good speed control but no clutch. They too have a lot of torque with the trigger at full speed. Also keep in mind your compressor capacity. Once I got underway installing screws, I had the drills running quite a bit. RonB
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Given that most Auto shops use air tools, and they have torque settings on the air wrenches, I would say that it is common, and you should look for that feature on when looking for tools. I am sure if you checked their web site out you would get the details on the specific tools get your answers first hand.

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Doug Miller wrote:

Go to HF and buy two of the 18v battery drills . Batteries cost almost as much as the drill so ... that'll give you more battery capacity , might be able to eke thru with those and what you already have .
--
Snag
"90 FLHTCU "Strider"
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Here is the perfect tool for what you are doing. I have used these for 22 years in carpentry and cabinetmaking: http://www.cpopowertools.com/products/dw268.html?ref=googaw&kw =&gcl id=COC8reW856ECFWI65wodJ0XQIw&keywordwaltdw268&sissr=1
woodstuff
| SWMBO wants me to build a small deck. Of course, every new project requires a | new tool, right? And my trusty Bosch cordless drill is showing its age a bit, | or to be more precise, the batteries are showing their age -- building a deck, | I'll definitely drain the batteries in much less time than it takes to | recharge them. | | So I'm looking at other options, including compressed air drills (e.g. saw one | at the Borg this evening for $45 or so). But I got to wondering... almost | every cordless drill has a multi-position clutch to prevent overtightening, or | sinking screws too deep. Does anybody make an air drill with such a clutch?
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On May 22, 9:26pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

For that you'd need a pneumatic screw driver, not a drill. Used in production, mostly. Probably not going to find one on the peg at HF. I have seen hex chucks with clutches for driving screws using a drill, might be one of those would do you. One of my favorite pneumatic drills would probably work pretty well with such a rig, it's a right angle jobbie and a whole lot smaller than any battery drill. Geared down, so should have enough torque. If you go that route, get one of the throttle swivels, good as a variable speed trigger. One of my favorite tools for working around gas tanks, no sparks. Stan
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I used 2 Makita battery drills. One 9.6 volt and one 12 volt. Used one for pilot holes and other to set screws. 700 square foot deck with railings and is 12 feet above ground. 3500 deck screws. 2 batteries for each drill. This was done 10 years ago. Did not know about stainless deck screws at that time ( or if they were available) Going to replace all now with SS screws as the origanal ones have rusted. Composite deck material. Will cost about $300 for screws. WW
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I was given a dead 12V Makita to fix, and agree that the two make a decent combination like that.
So far the ceramic-coated deck screws that I've removed after a year or two in pressure-treated wood have been in good condition. Friday I pulled out some electro-galvanized screws and lags that had been in dry, untreated wood for about 10 years, outdoors protected from rain. Most were rusty but not enough to weaken them.
The stainless deck screws I bought a few years ago stripped or broke more easily than regular steel screws.
jsw
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Do you think the batteries will be good enough when you resurrect those old drills to get those screws out again?
LOL
I used 2 Makita battery drills. One 9.6 volt and one 12 volt. Used one for pilot holes and other to set screws. 700 square foot deck with railings and is 12 feet above ground. 3500 deck screws. 2 batteries for each drill. This was done 10 years ago. Did not know about stainless deck screws at that time ( or if they were available) Going to replace all now with SS screws as the origanal ones have rusted. Composite deck material. Will cost about $300 for screws. WW
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On 5/23/2010 1:24 PM, Josepi wrote:

If they aren't I'm sure that Makita will be happy to sell him a replacement set, or he can get the old ones rebuilt.

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wrote:

Driver bits are pretty standard these days. A new drill will usually work, too. ;-)
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