compressed-air drills

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Dewalt 18XRP is the drill that I have, I love it and use it a lot. I have two batteries for it, but for continuous use I get out my electric drill.
i
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On Sun, 23 May 2010 18:28:16 -0500, Ignoramus32683

I have two 18V XRP drills, one a "compact" model (which isn't compact). I found one for less than $100 (less than the price of two batteries) on the get-it-outta-here table at HomeDespot. I also have the 6-1/2" circular saw, so six batteries. I don't use the drills often, though. I would much rather use the 12V Bosch and the Impactor. I'd break them out if I built a deck, though. ;-)
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On 5/23/2010 9:03 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

least on Trex. No cord to pull around when you need a little trimming. I used the gear drive Skilsaw for major cutting, but if you needed to square an end, reach for the battery saw.
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Yeah, the 18V Dewalt circular saw is really handy. Unlike the Makita 9.6V it's useful on far more than clapboards. For heavier work I have the Dewalt rear swivel circular saw. The rear swivel makes depth and angle adjustment a snap.
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My response to that is in many cases the batteries last longer than the human.
For indoor flooring double-upping a screw gun made for the job while standing up is in order. I have done rooms with battery drills and it's rough on the back, knees and wrists. Due the the inaccuracy of screw placement the above device is typically not usable.
Use the excuse to get a second battery drill, use both (four batteries) and wear the old one out. It may be good for the old ni-cad to get a good cycling too.
wrote:

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If you're going to be driving several hundered or a thousand deck screws, IMHO a goo quality corded screwgun would be the tool of choice.
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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I'll have to be careful stepping out the garden door onto my 16 x 12 cedar deck that doesn't exist, then.
What utter nonsense...
--
“The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people’s
money.” - Margaret Thatcher
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On 5/23/10 11:44 AM, Dave Balderstone wrote:

Yeah, I think someone hasn't kept up with technology. :-)
I have cheap (what I consider to be disposable) B&D 18volters that would do the job just fine. Like another guys posted, all you need is 3 batteries per drill, which is the minimum for me, anyway.
I never go to a site without a corded electric, as a back-up, but that cord is a PITA. And whoever wants to trade an AC cord for an air hose is adding bricks to their cart, imo.
--

-MIKE-

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For 15 years?

Dragging an air hose beats swinging a hammer, though.
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On 5/23/10 3:03 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Who swings a hammer? :-) A gas framing nailer is faster, lighter, and more convenient than any of those.
FWIW, last deck I did, I was much faster laying down the decking with my 22 oz Estwing and galvanized spirals than with a drill and screws.
I can definitely see where I could be faster with one of those screw self-feeders with the long extension and the depth stop driver. But I'm one of those "one tap to set, 2-3 swings to drive it home" hammer guys, so I can get a pretty fast rhythm going.
--

-MIKE-

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Never used one. I generally don't move much once set up, so there isn't much dragging anyway. The big advantage of an air nailer for me is no smiles in awkward-to-nail places. My thumbs feel better after, too. ;-)

Sure, but I've seen even ring-shank nails pop. Stainless screws are the only way to fly.

Saving time isn't high on my list. ;-) Saving aggravation later, is.
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On Sun, 23 May 2010 17:20:54 -0500, the renowned

I see the Cadillac way of making a deck...
- Autofeed stand up Screw gun (Amazon.com product link shortened)74654692/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n310091&s=industrial&qid74654692&sr=8-1
- collated 316 (!) stainless steel deck screw$$$ http://www.stainless-fasteners.com/collated_deck_screws_strips.htm
-Bluwood (tm) treated wood http://www.lowes.ca/products/bluwood.aspx
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
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"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
snipped-for-privacy@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
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On 5/23/10 5:20 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Not arguing here, but in my experience nails popping out is generally due to under-engineering in the manners of: movement caused by too much space between joists, and nails too short.
I know there are other causes, but I've seen nails pop due to those causes.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Maybe, but mine were 16" OC. The nails? For me, screws are easier in the long run.

Screws don't wreck the wood coming out, either.
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On 5/23/2010 10:04 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Driving nails at creative angles can do wonders towards preventing them from popping out.
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Free bad advice available here.
To reply, eat the taco.
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On 5/24/10 9:09 PM, Steve Turner wrote:

I was taught to drive opposing nails at a "V" which does wonders to increase holding power. (tangent)
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-MIKE-

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On 5/23/2010 3:53 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

What the heck do you know about rhythm? :-)
--
"Even if your wife is happy but you're unhappy, you're still happier
than you'd be if you were happy and your wife was unhappy." - Red Green
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On 5/24/10 9:04 PM, Steve Turner wrote:

Down beat and back beat.... that's about it. :-)
--

-MIKE-

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That's the sound of the men working on the chain ga-a-ang That's the sound of the men working on the chain_gang
All day long they're singin' (Hooh! aah!) (hooh! aah!) (Hooh! aah!) (hooh! aah!)
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Most pro framers, I have seen do not use compressed air, they swing a hammer. Try carrying a nailgun up into a framed roof rafter assembly while hanging on to the last truss member you hammered in to get at the next piece. A hammer and puch full of nails makes an easier climb and the nials are removable for a few eeks until they rust or set into the wood.

For 15 years?

Dragging an air hose beats swinging a hammer, though.
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