Buffing out West System 105/207

Been using West System epoxy for years but just recently started using their 207 hardner which gives a slightly amber, clear finish as an interior varnish. I put it on with a brush and it leveled out beautifully. Problem is its drying time allows it to collect dust. I just put it on the cabin sole (floor) of a boat and if it were not for the dust it would be perfect.
Anyone ever tried buffing out a 105/207 finish coat? How long does it need to cure before buffing?
Thanks,
Joe
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Joe Bleau wrote: > Been using West System epoxy for years but just recently started using > their 207 hardner which gives a slightly amber, clear finish as an > interior varnish. I put it on with a brush and it leveled out > beautifully. Problem is its drying time allows it to collect dust. I > just put it on the cabin sole (floor) of a boat and if it were not for > the dust it would be perfect. > > Anyone ever tried buffing out a 105/207 finish coat? How long does it > need to cure before buffing?
You have a bigger problem than dust.
The 105/207 contains NO UV inhibitors.
Even on a protected cabin sole, expect it to yellow out and blister.
May take two seasons, but it will happen.
Lew
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Lew, What would you have used? Thanks, JG

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JGS wrote:
> Lew, > What would you have used? Thanks, JG
Tough question.
On one hand, an unfinished teak & holly sole provides a non slip surface so necessary in a seaway; however, many people do not find it attractive.
OTOH, varnish (not spar) or clear L/P provides a nice shiny surface that can be very slippery in a seaway.
Believe it or not, I used Scotts Liquid Gold, applied monthly.
Was kind of like oiling your furniture.
Lew
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What's wrong with wearing cleats? . . . . . . .
*ducking*
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On Wed, 14 Feb 2007 05:23:17 GMT, Lew Hodgett

Well, the valuable thing about this group is there are so many who are willing to help and share ideas. I really appreciate Lew's response telling me that I have "a bigger problem than dust." However, Lew doesn't give me much credit for having thought this out.
I am well aware of the slipperiness of any varnished deck, whether it be teak and holly or sassafras. I am also knowledgeable about the UV exposure problems of epoxy. In this case there happen to be a couple of mitigating factors: (1) West system 207 epoxy hardner, unlike other West hardners, contains a certain amount of UV inhibitors--not enough for full UV exposure but probably sufficient for a cabin sole which only gets whatever UV filters through port lights, hatches, and companionways. But that is not the end of that story, either. Tomorrow the Miami boat show opens. For years I have passed a booth where a guy sells a high-gloss, non-skid varnish. Since I do not really know the product I decided that I would put down the 105/207 and top it off with this guy's non-skid product. That way I would have a very hard and durable coat on the sole while could then be coated with the high-gloss non-skid.
When I saw how well four coats of 105/207 looked (with the exception of some dust that needs buffing out) I gave some thought to buffing it and leaving it without anything additional on top. My 41-footer is well equipped with grab rails which I have strategically placed based on years of moving about the boat, occasionally in 20-foot+ seas. Naturally, I would prefer a high gloss non-skid but if I can't have that I will just take my chances by either buffing out the 105/207 or using better dust control for the final coat. Somehow this is more appealing than having to oil down my cabin sole every month.
105/207 has been used for years by boaters who seek long-lasting bright work. Several coats of 105/207 are put on the wood, followed by the exterior (UV) varnish of your choice. This is not something new or experimental. It is even used by canoe, kayak, and runabout builders who seek a varnished hull. I, personally, have used this system for years on my exterior bright work.
My question was, and remains, has anyone in this group ever tried buffing it out. If I do not get an answer from someone who understands what I am doing I will simply put several coats on a test panel and see for myself whether it buffs or not. By posting here I was hoping I could benefit from someone else's experience and avoid the work of creating a test panel.
As a matter of fact I have been thinking that I will use the 105/207 on the next piece of furniture I want to varnish. On furniture I can obtain better dust control. The great thing about it is that you can apply four coats in one day. 105/207 is almost all solids and will fill open grain in an amazing way. It is resistant to all the solvents I know of (at least those used in furniture finishing) so, if one wanted, any sort of top coat could then be applied (nitrocellulose, polyurethane, alkyd varnish, water-based finished, et al). It does not to be sprayed but will level out nicely using a quality natural bristle brush or by using the roll-and-tip method. I will be quite surprised if there isn't a furniture maker in this group has not already discovered this. If not, then I think the word will get out as it really lends itself to one-of-a-kind furniture finishing.
Let's see how it develops and thanks for your help.
Joe
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